New UNICEF Briefing Outlines Risks Facing Migrant Children During the Pandemic

30 April 2021
Research Innovation

A recent issue brief by UNICEF outlines the gendered vulnerabilities and risks faced by migrant and displaced children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The brief points to the continued vulnerability of migrant and displaced children—especially girls—that has only further deepened in light of the pandemic. The brief, for example, points to the fact that migrant women have been primarily responsible for care work both prior to and during the pandemic. This burden of care will likely be passed on to their daughters, who will have less time for school, play and leisure. Needless to say, this will only further exacerbate gender inequality. Among the other risks outlined in the brief is that of trafficking. As children are forced to flee crises, they are more likely to have to rely on riskier, more expensive smuggling networks, which places them at higher risk of exploitation, abuse debt and trafficking. The brief ends by highlighting some immediate gender-responsive actions that can be taken to help mitigate some of the risks migrant and displaced children are currently facing. The brief can be accessed here.

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