University of Nottingham Rights Lab Publishes Briefing on COVID-19 Impacts on Modern Slavery in Sudan

20 April 2021
Research Innovation

The University of Nottingham Rights Lab, with Global Partners Governance, Royal United Services Institute and Waging Peace, has published an emerging findings briefing on COVID-19’s impacts on modern slavery in Sudan based on a systematic evidence review and five semi-structured interviews with individuals working on human trafficking or modern slavery in the country. Several key findings emerged:

  • The pandemic has closed borders and disrupted transit of migrants through Sudan.
  • There has been disproportionate impact on groups of individuals that are typically vulnerable to exploitation: refugees and internally-displaced persons, informal and seasonal sector workers, and domestic workers – as well as on children, particularly girls, who have seen education disrupted by the pandemic.
  • Social support and assistance, including healthcare, has been disrupted.

The briefing notes that these negative impacts come at a time when Sudan already faces economic and and social insecurity following a prolonged period of conflict and displacement, and the authors offer interim recommendations for governmental, non-governmental and inter-governmental actors working in Sudan and the surrounding region to mitigate the increased risk of modern slavery due to COVID-19.

The emerging finding briefing can be reviewed here.

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