New Report Identifies Common Flaws in Defining Trafficking through First Global Study of Domestic Anti-Trafficking Laws

18 December 2021
Research Innovation

Twenty years after its adoption, the Palermo Protocol has reached almost universal ratification. While impressive, the actual implementation of the Protocol’s obligation to criminalize all forms of trafficking at the national level is even more notable. Presently, the vast majority of countries in the world criminalize trafficking in persons, as defined under international law. While this paper by Souyma Silver from Yale Law and Policy Review acknowledges and celebrates this uniformity, it also seeks to highlight some notable gaps in criminal provisions across dozens of countries’ current laws. Read more here.

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