Data Dashboards

Argentina Dashboard
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2011 and 2012 decreased by 31%.

-31%

2011- 2012

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF Data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.827 (2015)

Mean Years of Education: 9.8 years (2015)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 20.5% (2013)

Working Poverty Rate: 2.39% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Ratified 2016
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2002
Social Protections Coverage

General (at least one): 66.1% (2016)

Pension: 100% (2016)

Unemployed: 7.2% (2016)

Poor: No Data

Vulnerable: 21.4% (2016)

Disabled: 8.2% (2016)

Children: 59.7% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS) resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Argentina, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2011 to 2012. Only the measure provided for 2004 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays the difference in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is only provided for 2004.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Argentina, estimates show that 2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2004. Only the measure provided for 2004 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2012.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Argentina, estimates show that 6.8 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2004. Only the measure provided for 2004 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is only provided for 2004.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2011 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Argentina was 7 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 8.3 hours worked, on average, in 2004.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2011. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2011, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 9.4 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2004, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 22.2.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work in economic activities who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2011.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week for children aged 5-14.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 3.7 hours per week according to the 2011 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2004, which found that children aged 5-14 in Argentina worked an average of 7 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2011.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Argentina is from 2004. By the 2004 estimate, the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Other Services sector and Agriculture sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Argentina.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Argentina.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data through their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC):The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Argentina between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Argentina is 0.827. This score indicates that human development is high.

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Argentina over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

 

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1990 and 2013, Argentina showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases the vulnerability of individuals to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and nonfatal, disaggregating on sex and migrant status.  As the ILO explains:

“The recommended data sources for occupational injuries statistics are national systems for the notification of occupational injuries (such as, labour inspection records and annual reports; insurance and compensation records, death registers), supplemented by household surveys (especially in order to cover informal sector enterprises and the self-employed) and/or establishment surveys.”

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.
Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Argentina.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajo Forzoso (Forced Labour)

Ley 26.364, 2008, amend. Ley 26.842, 2012
Artículo 2. A los fines de esta ley se entiende por explotación la configuración de cualquiera de los siguientes supuestos, sin perjuicio de que constituyan delitos autónomos respecto del delito de trata de personas:

b. Cuando se obligare a una persona a realizar trabajos o servicios forzados;

Trabajo infantil (Child Labour)

Ley 26.390, 2008
Artículo 2. La presente ley alcanzará el trabajo de las personas menores de dieciocho (18) años en todas sus formas.

Se eleva la edad mínima de admisión al empleo a dieciséis (16) años en los términos de la presente.

Queda prohibido el trabajo de las personas menores de dieciséis (16) años en todas sus formas, exista o no relación de empleo contractual, y sea éste remunerado o no.

Toda ley, convenio colectivo o cualquier otra fuente normativa que establezca una edad mínima de admisión al empleo distinta a la fijada en el segundo párrafo, se considerará a ese solo efecto modificada por esta norma.

La inspección del trabajo deberá ejercer las funciones conducentes al cumplimiento de dicha prohibición.

Ley 20.744, 1976, amend. Ley 26.390, 2008
Artículo 189. Menores de dieciséis (16) años. Prohibición de su empleo. Queda prohibido a los empleadores ocupar personas menores de dieciséis (16) años en cualquier tipo de actividad, persiga o no fines de lucro.

Artículo 189bis. Empresa de la familia. Excepción. Las personas mayores de catorce (14) y menores a la edad indicada en el artículo anterior podrán ser ocupados en empresas cuyo titular sea su padre, madre o tutor, en jornadas que no podrán superar las tres (3) horas diarias, y las quince (15) horas semanales, siempre que no se trate de tareas penosas, peligrosas y/o insalubres, y que cumplan con la asistencia escolar. La empresa de la familia del trabajador menor que pretenda acogerse a esta excepción a la edad mínima de admisión al empleo, deberá obtener autorización de la autoridad administrativa laboral de cada jurisdicción.

Cuando, por cualquier vínculo o acto, o mediante cualquiera de las formas de descentralización productiva, la empresa del padre, la madre o del tutor se encuentre subordinada económicamente o fuere contratista o proveedora de otra empresa, no podrá obtener la autorización establecida en esta norma.

Ley 26.061 de protección integral de los derechos de las niñas, niños y adolescentes, 2005
Artículo 9. Derecho a la Dignidad y a la Integridad Personal. Las niñas, niños y adolescentes tienen derecho a la dignidad como sujetos de derechos y de personas en desarrollo; a no ser sometidos a trato violento, discriminatorio, vejatorio, humillante, intimidatorio; a no ser sometidos a ninguna forma de explotación económica, torturas, abusos o negligencias, explotación sexual, secuestros o tráfico para cualquier fin o en cualquier forma o condición cruel o degradante.

Las niñas, niños y adolescentes tienen derecho a su integridad física, sexual, psíquica y moral.
La persona que tome conocimiento de malos tratos, o de situaciones que atenten contra la integridad psíquica, física, sexual o moral de un niño, niña o adolescente, o cualquier otra violación a sus derechos, debe comunicar a la autoridad local de aplicación de la presente ley.
Los Organismos del Estado deben garantizar programas gratuitos de asistencia y atención integral que promuevan la recuperación de todas las niñas, niños y adolescentes.

Artículo 25. Derecho al Trabajo de los Adolescentes. Los Organismos del Estado deben garantizar el derecho de las personas adolescentes a la educación y reconocer su derecho a trabajar con las restricciones que imponen la legislación vigente y los convenios internacionales sobre erradicación del trabajo infantil, debiendo ejercer la inspección del trabajo contra la explotación laboral de las niñas, niños y adolescentes.

Este derecho podrá limitarse solamente cuando la actividad laboral importe riesgo, peligro para el desarrollo, la salud física, mental o emocional de los adolescentes.

Los Organismos del Estado, la sociedad y en particular las organizaciones sindicales coordinarán sus esfuerzos para erradicar el trabajo infantil y limitar toda forma de trabajo legalmente autorizada cuando impidan o afecten su proceso evolutivo.

Peores Formas de Trabajo Infantil (Worst Forms of Child Labour)

Ley 20.744, 1976, amend. Ley 26.390, 2008
Artículo 191. Descanso al mediodía. Trabajo a domicilio. Tareas penosas, peligrosas o insalubres. Remisión. Con relación a las personas menores de dieciocho (18) años que trabajen en horas de la mañana y de la tarde rige lo dispuesto en el artículo 174 de esta ley; en todos los casos rige lo dispuesto en los artículos 175 y 176 de esta ley.

Ley 20.744, 1976
Artículo 176. Tareas penosas, peligrosas o insalubres. Prohibición.
Queda prohibido ocupar a mujeres en trabajos que revistan carácter penoso, peligroso o insalubre. La reglamentación determinará las industrias comprendidas en esta prohibición.

Decreto 1117, 2016
Artículo 1. Determinan los tipos de trabajo, actividades, ocupaciones y tareas que constituyen trabajo peligroso para las personas menores de DIECIOCHO (18) años, en los términos del artículo 3, inciso d), del Convenio sobre la Prohibición de las Peores Formas de Trabajo Infantil y la Acción Inmediata para su Eliminación, 1999 (182) aprobado por la Ley N° 25.255:

1. Aquellos en que los niños, niñas y adolescentes queden expuestos a abusos de orden físico, psicológico o sexual.
2. Los que se realicen bajo tierra, bajo el agua, en alturas peligrosas o en espacios confinados.
3. Los que impliquen la manipulación de elementos cortantes, punzantes, atrapantes, triturantes y lacerantes tales como vidrio, acero, madera, cobre, agujas y maquinaria, equipos y herramientas peligrosas; y aquellos trabajos, actividades, ocupaciones y tareas que conlleven la manipulación, el transporte manual de cargas pesadas y cargas ligeras manipuladas en forma continua.
4. Los realizados en un medio ambiente en el que los niños, niñas y adolescentes queden expuestos a sustancias, agentes o procesos químicos peligrosos.
5. Los realizados en un medio ambiente en el que los niños, niñas y adolescentes queden expuestos a ruidos, vibraciones, temperaturas extremas, radiaciones, altas concentraciones de humedad y otros agentes o contaminantes físicos peligrosos y ambientes con ventilación e higiene inadecuadas. Asimismo se les prohíbe desarrollar tareas en lugares o ambientes laborales que estén tramitando su declaración de insalubridad.
6. Los realizados en un medio ambiente en el que los niños, niñas y adolescentes queden expuestos a sustancias o agentes biológicos peligrosos.
7. Los organizados en jornadas y horarios que sobrepasen los legalmente establecidos, y los trabajos nocturnos. Teniendo presente para ello, que ninguna extensión horaria, deberá interferir en el desarrollo integral del niño/a o adolescente.
8. Los que se lleven a cabo en el mar y en aguas interiores, cualquiera sea la actividad o tarea.
9. Los de fabricación, venta, colocación y manejo de sustancias u objetos explosivos o artículos pirotécnicos.
10. Los de construcción de obras, mantenimiento de rutas, represas, puentes y muelles y obras similares, que específicamente impliquen movimiento de tierra, manipulación del asfalto, carpeteo de rutas, perfilado y reciclado de carpeta asfáltica y su demarcación.
11. Aquellos realizados con electricidad que impliquen el montaje, regulación y reparación de instalaciones eléctricas.
12. Los consistentes en producción, repartición o venta exclusiva de bebidas alcohólicas y en establecimientos de consumo inmediato, como también de tabaco, artículos pornográficos y sustancias psicoactivas.
13. Aquellos en los cuales tanto la propia seguridad como la de otras personas se encuentren a cargo de niños, niñas o adolescentes, como lo son las labores de vigilancia, cuidado de personas menores de edad, de adultos mayores o de enfermos, y el traslado de dinero o de otros bienes.
14. Los de cuidado, vigilancia, alimentación, extracción de productos del ganado y/o animales que puedan ser vectores de enfermedades o puedan atacar al cuidador.
15. Los de contacto y manejo de animales muertos y plantas venenosas o cortantes.
16. Los que requieran posiciones corporales inadecuadas, que comprometan el crecimiento y desarrollo del sistema osteomuscular.
17. Los realizados en la vía pública y en los medios de transporte, con exposición a riesgos de accidentes viales, incluido el manejo de vehículos.
18. Los realizados en ambientes con maltrato verbal o violencia psicológica, degradación, aislamiento, abandono y carencia afectiva.
19. Los que conllevan cargas de tipo psicológico, exigencias y responsabilidades inadecuadas a la edad, y los trabajos socialmente valorados como negativos.
20. Los que impliquen traslado a otras provincias y el tránsito de las fronteras nacionales.
21. Los que se desarrollen en terrenos en cuya topografía existan zanjas, hoyos, huecos, canales, cauces de agua naturales o artificiales, terraplenes y precipicios o que sean susceptibles de experimentar derrumbes o deslizamientos de tierra.
22. Los de modelaje con erotización de la imagen que acarree peligros de hostigamiento psicológico, estimulación sexual temprana y riesgo de abuso sexual.

Trata de Seres Humanos, Trata de Personas (Trafficking in Persons)

Ley 26.364, 2008, amend. Ley 26.842, 2012
Artículo 2. Se entiende por trata de personas el ofrecimiento, la captación, el traslado, la recepción o acogida de personas con fines de explotación, ya sea dentro del territorio nacional, como desde o hacia otros países.

El consentimiento dado por la víctima de la trata y explotación de personas no constituirá en ningún caso causal de eximición de responsabilidad penal, civil o administrativa de los autores, partícipes, cooperadores o instigadores.

Esclavitud (Slavery)

Constitución de la Nación de Argentina, 1853
Artículo 15. En la Nación Argentina no hay esclavos: Los pocos que hoy existen quedan libres desde la jura de esta Constitución; y una ley especial regulará las indemnizaciones a que dé lugar esta declaración. Todo contrato de compra y venta de personas es un crimen de que serán responsables los que lo celebrasen, y el escribano o funcionario que lo autorice. Y los esclavos que de cualquier modo se introduzcan quedan libres por el solo hecho de pisar el territorio de la República.

(Eng: In the Argentine Nation there are no slaves: the few who still exist shall become free as from the swearing of this constitution. Any contract for the purchase and sale of persons is a crime for which the parties shall be liable, as well as the notary or officer authorizing it. And slaves who by any means enter the nation shall be free by the mere fact of entering the territory of the Republic)

International Commitments
National Strategies

Third National Action Plan for the Prevention and Eradication of Child Labor and the Regulation of Adolescent Work (2016-2020)

“Aims to prevent and eliminate child labor, including its worst forms, and to regulate adolescent work. Promotes the dissemination of information on child labor, strengthens the COPRETI and creates Local Roundtables on Child Labor, promotes families’ livelihoods, strengthens the labor inspectorate, fosters civil society engagement on child labor issues, provides for a more inclusive educational system, raises awareness of the safety and health implications of child labor, and promotes institutional and legislative strengthening regarding child labor issues.”

Primer Plan Nacional de Acción en Derechos Humanos 2017-2020

“2.6 Trata de personas Objetivo estratégico: Garantizar la promoción y protección de los derechos humanos de las personas afectadas por el delito de trata de personas.”

International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1950

ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029, Ratified 2016

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1960

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 1996

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Ratified 1964

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2002

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: involvement of children in armed conflict, Ratified 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2003

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance

Ley 26.364, 2008
Artículo 5. No punibilidad. Las víctimas de la trata de personas no son punibles por la comisión de cualquier delito que sea el resultado directo de haber sido objeto de trata. Tampoco les serán aplicables las sanciones o impedimentos establecidos en la legislación migratoria cuando las infracciones sean consecuencia de la actividad desplegada durante la comisión del ilícito que las damnificada.

Ley 26.364, 2008, amend. Ley 26.842, 2012
Artículo 6. El Estado nacional garantiza a la víctima de los delitos de trata o explotación de personas los siguientes derechos, con prescindencia de su condición de denunciante o querellante en el proceso penal correspondiente y hasta el logro efectivo de las reparaciones pertinentes:

a. Recibir información sobre los derechos que le asisten en su idioma y en forma accesible a su edad y madurez, de modo tal que se asegure el pleno acceso y ejercicio de los derechos económicos, sociales y culturales que le correspondan;
b. Recibir asistencia psicológica y médica gratuitas, con el fin de garantizar su
reinserción social;
c. Recibir alojamiento apropiado, manutención, alimentación suficiente y elementos de higiene personal;
d. Recibir capacitación laboral y ayuda en la búsqueda de empleo;
e. Recibir asesoramiento legal integral y patrocinio jurídico gratuito en sede judicial y administrativa, en todas las instancias;
f. Recibir protección eficaz frente a toda posible represalia contra su persona o su familia, quedando expeditos a tal efecto todos los remedios procesales disponibles a tal fin. En su caso, podrá solicitar su incorporación al Programa Nacional de Protección de Testigos en las condiciones previstas por la ley 25.764;
g. Permanecer en el país, si así lo decidiera, recibiendo la documentación necesaria a tal fin. En caso de corresponder, será informada de la posibilidad de formalizar una petición de refugio en los términos de la ley 26.165;
h. Retornar a su lugar de origen cuando así lo solicitare. En los casos de víctima residente en el país que, como consecuencia del delito padecido, quisiera emigrar, se le garantizará la posibilidad de hacerlo;
i. Prestar testimonio en condiciones especiales de protección y cuidado;
j. Ser informada del estado de las actuaciones, de las medidas adoptadas y de la evolución del proceso;
k. Ser oída en todas las etapas del proceso;
l. A la protección de su identidad e intimidad;
m. A la incorporación o reinserción en el sistema educativo;
n. En caso de tratarse de víctima menor de edad, además de los derechos precedentemente enunciados, se garantizará que los procedimientos reconozcan sus necesidades especiales que implican la condición de ser un sujeto en pleno desarrollo de la personalidad. Las medidas de protección no podrán restringir sus derechos y garantías, ni implicar privación de su libertad. Se procurará la reincorporación a su núcleo familiar o al lugar que mejor proveer para su protección y desarrollo.

Penalties

Ley 26.940 de Promoción del Trabajo Registrado y Prevención del Fraude Laboral, 2014
Artículo 1. Créase el Registro Público de Empleadores con Sanciones Laborales (REPSAL), en el ámbito del Ministerio de Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social

Artículo 3. Las sanciones impuestas por infracciones a la Ley de Prohibición del Trabajo Infantil y Protección del Trabajo Adolescente 26.390 y a la ley 26.847, una vez firmes, deberán ser informadas por el tribunal actuante al Ministerio de Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social, para ser incorporadas al Registro Público de Empleadores con Sanciones Laborales (REPSAL).

Artículo 4. Las sentencias condenatorias por infracción a la ley 26.364 de Prevención y Sanción de la Trata de Personas y Asistencia a sus Víctimas, una vez firmes, deberán ser informadas al Ministerio de Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social por el tribunal actuante para su incorporación al Registro Público de Empleadores con Sanciones Laborales (REPSAL).

Codigo Penal amend. Ley 26.842, 2012
Artículo 123.6. En el caso de condena impuesta por alguno de los delitos previstos por los artículos 125, 125 bis, 127, 140, 142 bis, 145 bis, 145 ter y 170 de este Código, queda comprendido entre los bienes a decomisar la cosa mueble o inmueble donde se mantuviera a la víctima privada de su libelad u objeto de explotación. Los bienes decomisados con motivo de tales delitos, según los términos del presente artículo, y el producido de las multas que se impongan, serán afectados a programas de asistencia a la víctima.

Artículo 125 bis. El que promoviere o facilitare la prostitución de una persona será penado con prisión de cuatro (4) a seis (6) años de prisión, aunque mediare el consentimiento de la víctima.

Artículo 126. En el caso del artículo anterior, la pena será de cinco (5) a diez (10) años de prisión, si concurriere alguna de las siguientes circunstancias:

1. Mediare engaño, fraude, violencia, amenaza o cualquier otro medio de intimidación o coerción, abuso de autoridad o de una situación de vulnerabilidad, o concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre la víctima.
2. El autor fuere ascendiente, descendiente, cónyuge, afín en línea recta, colateral o conviviente, tutor, curador, autoridad o ministro de cualquier culto reconocido o no, o encargado de la educación o de la guarda de la víctima.
3. El autor fuere funcionario público o miembro de una fuerza de seguridad, policial o penitenciaria.

Cuando la víctima fuere menor de dieciocho (18) años la pena será de diez (10) a quince (15) años de prisión.

Artículo 127. Será reprimido con prisión de cuatro (4) a seis (6) años, el que explotare económicamente el ejercicio de la prostitución de una persona, aunque mediare el consentimiento de la víctima. La pena será de cinco (5) a diez (10) años de prisión, si concurriere alguna de las siguientes circunstancias:

1. Mediare engaño, fraude, violencia, amenaza o cualquier otro medio de intimidación o coerción, abuso de autoridad o de una situación de vulnerabilidad, o concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre la víctima.
2. El autor fuere ascendiente, descendiente, cónyuge, afín en línea recta, colateral o conviviente, tutor, curador, autoridad o ministro de cualquier culto reconocido o no, o encargado de la educación o de la guarda de la víctima.
3. El autor fuere funcionario público o miembro de una fuerza de seguridad, policial o penitenciaria.

Cuando la víctima fuere menor de dieciocho (18) años la pena será de diez (10) a quince (15) años de prisión.

Artículo 140. Serán reprimidos con reclusión o prisión de cuatro (4) a quince (15) años el que redujere a una persona a esclavitud o servidumbre, bajo cualquier modalidad, y el que la recibiere en tal condición para mantenerla en ella. En la misma pena incurrirá el que obligare a una persona a realizar trabajos o servicios forzados o a contraer matrimonio servil.

Artículo 145 bis. Será reprimido con prisión de cuatro (4) a ocho (8) años, el que ofreciere, captare, trasladare, recibiere o acogiera personas con fines de explotación, ya sea dentro del territorio nacional, como desde o hacia otros países, aunque mediare el consentimiento de la víctima.

Artículo 145 ter. En los supuestos del artículo 145 bis la pena será de cinco (5) a diez (10) años de prisión, cuando:

1. Mediare engaño, fraude, violencia, amenaza o cualquier otro medio de intimidación o coerción,
abuso de autoridad o de una situación de vulnerabilidad, o concesión o recepción de pagos o
beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre la víctima.
2. La víctima estuviere embarazada, o fuere mayor de setenta (70) años.
3. La víctima fuera una persona discapacitada, enferma o que no pueda valerse por sí misma.
4. Las víctimas fueren tres (3) o más.
5. En la comisión del delito participar en tres (3) o más personas.
6. El autor fuere ascendiente, descendiente, cónyuge, afín en línea recta, colateral o conviviente, tutor, curador, autoridad o ministro de cualquier culto reconocido o no, o encargado de la educación o de la guarda de la víctima.
7. El autor fuere funcionario público o miembro de una fuerza de seguridad, policial o penitenciaria.

Cuando se lograra consumar la explotación de la víctima objeto del delito de trata de personas la pena será de ocho (8) a doce (12) años de prisión.

Cuando la víctima fuere menor de dieciocho (18) años la pena será de diez (10) a quince (15) años de prisión.

Codigo Penal amend. Ley 26.847, 2013
Artículo 148 bis. Será reprimido con prisión de 1 (uno) a (cuatro) años el que aprovechare económicamente el trabajo de un niño o niña en violación de las normas nacionales que prohíben el trabajo infantil, siempre que el hecho no importare un delito más grave.

Quedan exceptuadas las tareas que tuvieren fines pedagógicos o de capacitación exclusivamente.

No será punible el padre, madre, tutor o guardador del niño o niña que incurriere en la conducta descripta.

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk for exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protections: General (at Least One)
Social Protections (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protections: Unemployed
Social Protections: Pension
Social Protections: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protections: Poor
Social Protections: Children
Social Protections: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Argentina. If you are a representative of Argentina and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us at info@delta87.org.