Data Dashboards

Benin
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data with a complete statistical definition is only provided for 2011. There is no change to report.

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.520 (2018)

Mean School Years: 3.8 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 88.0% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 38.8% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 11.0% (2017)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Benin, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2011. Only the measure provided for 2011 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2003 and 2011. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Benin, the latest estimates show that 0.5 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2011.

Only the measure provided for 2011 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2011 and 2012. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Benin, the latest estimates show that 13.6 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2011.

Only the measure provided for 2011 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2011. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2012 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Benin was 15.1 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 32.7 hours in 2011.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2011 and 2012. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2012, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 20.3 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2011, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 33.2. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2011 and 2012. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 14.1 hours per week according to the 2012 estimate. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2012. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Benin is from 2011. By the 2011 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Other Services sector, the Manufacturing sector, the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Benin.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Benin.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Benin between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Benin is 0.520. This score indicates that human development is low. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Benin over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Benin showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from _(year) to _(year). The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Benin.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Travail forcé

Code du travail, 1998

Art.3.- Le travail forcé est interdit de façon abso- lue.
Le travail forcé est un travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de plein gré.

travail des enfants

Code du travail, 1998

Art.166.- Les enfants ne peuvent être employés dans aucune entreprise avant l’âge de 14 ans.
Art.167.- Les jeunes travailleurs âgés de 14 à 21 ans ont les mêmes droits que les travailleurs de leur catégorie professionnelle. Les jeunes travailleurs ne peuvent en aucun cas subir des abattements de sa- laires ou déclassements professionnels du fait de leur âge.
L’employeur tient un registre de toutes les person- nes de moins de 18 ans employées dans son entre- prise, avec pour chacune d’elles, l’indication de sa date de naissance.

Article 210 : Interdiction d’exploitation de l’enfant
L’enfant est protégé contre toutes les formes d’exploitation économique ou d’utilisation abusive à des fins économiques. L’abus concerne notamment : – le poids du travail par rapport à l’âge de l’enfant ;

– le temps et la durée de travail ;
– l’insuffisance ou l’absence de la rémunération ;
– l’entrave du travail par rapport à l’accès à l’éducation, au développement physique, mental, moral, social et spirituel de l’enfant ;
– l’emploi de l’enfant, en entreprise, avant l’âge de quatorze (14) ans.

Article 211 : Interdiction d’entrave à l’éducation
Sans préjudice pour son emploi, l’enfant conserve le droit de poursuivre ses études au moins jusqu’à l’âge de dix-huit (18) ans. Toute entrave à l’éducation de l’enfant en emploi est punie par la loi.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Code de l’enfant, 2015

Article 2 : Définition de l’enfant
Aux termes de la présente loi, on entend par “enfant” tout être humain âgé de moins de dix-huit (18) ans.
Le terme “mineur” prend le même sens que celui d’enfant.

Article 3 : Définition des termes et concepts essentiels
Aux termes de la présente loi, les termes et les concepts utilisés sont définis ainsi qu’il suit :
– exploitation économique de l’enfant : toute forme d’utilisation abusive de l’enfant à des fins économiques ;
– mendicité : fait pour un enfant de solliciter du public des dons dans son propre intérêt ou celui d’un tiers ayant un pouvoir sur lui ;
– traite d’enfants : toute convention ayant pour objet l’aliénation, soit à titre gratuit, soit à titre onéreux, de la liberté ou de la personne d’un enfant ;

Article 201 : Interdiction de traite d’enfant
La traite d’enfant est interdite en République du Bénin.

Article 203 : L’exploitation d’enfant
L’exploitation comprend, sans que cette énumération soit limitative :

a- toutes les formes d’esclavage ou de pratiques analogues ;
b- la servitude pour dette et le servage ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire ;
c- l’utilisation des enfants dans des conflits armés ou pour des prélèvements d’organes ;
d- l’utilisation ou l’offre d’enfant aux fins d’activités illicites ;
e- les travaux qui, par leur nature et/ou les conditions dans lesquelles ils s’exercent, sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité et à la moralité de l’enfant.

Article 212 : Interdiction de certaines formes de travaux
Les pires formes de travail interdites chez les enfants sont :

– toutes les formes d’esclavage ou pratiques analogues, telles que la vente et la traite des enfants, la servitude pour dettes et le servage ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire, y compris le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire des enfants dans des conflits armés ;
– toute utilisation, toute offre ou tout recrutement d’un enfant à des fins de prostitution, ou de production de matériels et/ou de spectacles pornographiques ;
– toute utilisation, toute offre ou tout recrutement d’un enfant aux fins d’activités illicites, notamment la production et le trafic de stupéfiants ;
– tous les travaux qui, de par leur nature ou les conditions de leur exercice, sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité, à l’éducation, à la moralité et au développement harmonieux de l’enfant.
Un arrêté du ministre en charge du travail fixe la nature des pires formes de travail interdites aux enfants.
Les pires formes de travail des enfants sont interdites.

Article 213 : Délai horaire de travail de l’enfant
L’enfant ne peut pas travailler plus de quatre (04) heures par jour sans repos.

Article 214 : Interdiction du travail de nuit
Le travail de nuit est interdit chez les enfants.
Les heures de travail qui peuvent être assimilées au “travail de nuit” sont fixées conformément aux dispositions de la loi portant code du travail.

Loi portant conditions de deplacement des mineurs et repression de la traite d’enfatns en Republique du Benin, 2006

Article 2: Le terme ((enfant)} désigne toute personne âgée de moins de dix-huit (18) ans.

Article 3 : Sont qualifiées traite d’enfants, toutes conventions ayant pour objet d’aliéner, soit à titre gratuit, soit à titre onéreux, la liberté ou la personne d’un enfant.
On entend également par traite d’enfants, le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, le placement, l’accueil ou l’hébergement d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation quel que soit le moyen utilisé.

Article 4 : L’exploitation comprend, sans que cette énumération soit
limitative:

– toutes les formes d’esclavage ou de pratiques analogues, la servitude pour dette et le servage ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire, l’utilisation des enfants dans des conflits armés ou pour des prélèvements d’organes;
– l’utilisation ou l’offre d’enfant aux fins de prostitution, de production d’ œuvres pornographiques ou de spectacles pornographiques;
– l’utilisation ou l’offre d’enfant aux fins d’activités illicites;
– les travaux qui, par leur nature et/ou les conditions dans lesquelles ilss’exercent, sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité, à la moralité de l’enfant ou de le livrer à lui-même.Article 5: L’utilisation de la main-d’œuvre enfantine est interdite
en République du Bénin, sauf dans les cas prévus par la loi et les conventions internationales.

Article 6 : La traite d’enfant est interdite en République du Bénin.

La Traite des personnes

Code penal, 2018

Article 499 : Constitue un acte de traite des personnes le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement, l’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre et l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre, aux fins d’exploitation.
L’exploitation comprend au minimum, l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui ou d’autres formes d’exploitation sexuelle, le travail ou les services forcés, l’esclavage ou les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage, la servitude ou le prélèvement d’organes.
Le consentement d’une victime de la traite des personnes à l’exploitation envisagée, telle qu’énoncée à l’alinéa 2 du présent article est indifférent lorsque l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés à l’alinéa premier du présent article a été utilisé.
Constitue également une forme d’exploitation, le fait pour un parent biologique ou un tuteur d’utiliser les services d’un enfant de moins de 14 ans à des fins lucratives.

Article 500 : Constitue également un acte de traite d’enfants toute convention ayant pour objet l’aliénation, soit à titre gratuit, soit à titre onéreux, de la liberté ou de la personne d’un enfant

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1960

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1961

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2001 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Not signed

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2005

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2005

National Action Plans, National Strategies

Action Plan to Eradicate Child Exploitation in Markets

“Aims to eliminate the worst forms of child labor in the major markets of Benin, including Dantokpa in Cotonou, Ouando in Porto-Novo, and Arzèkè in Parakou; strengthen child labor laws; raise awareness of child labor in markets; and create social programs for children rescued from labor exploitation in the targeted markets. As part of this initiative in 2017, the government launched the “Zero Children in Working Situations in the Markets” campaign, which aims to remove children from these situations.”

National Policy for Child Protection (2014–2025)

“Aims to improve child protection in Benin. Includes components to improve school feeding programs and combat the worst forms of child labor, with a focus on child trafficking. At the end of 2017, the policy was awaiting final approval by the Council of Ministers.”

UN Development Assistance Framework (2014–2018)

“Outlines the collective actions and strategies of the UN system for achieving national development goals, including specific activities to address child labor by increasing access to social protection services. In 2017, undertook activities to support a school canteen program and a second-chance education program for children who drop out of school.”

Plan d’action national de lutte contre la traite des enfants à des fins d’exploitation de leur travail

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, General/WFCL

Code de l’enfant, 2015

Article 206 : Réintégration sociale de l’enfant
L’enfant victime de torture, de traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants, de viol, de pédophilie ou de toutes autres formes d’agressions physiques ou psychologiques, a le droit de reprendre sa vie normale ou d’être réintégré.

Article 207 : Droit des enfants sortis de prison
Les enfants ayant fait l’objet de détention, ont le droit de poursuivre leurs études ou de se trouver un emploi conformément aux dispositions de la présente loi.

Article 208 : Responsabilité civile
Tout citoyen béninois veille et contribue à la réinsertion sociale des enfants s’étant trouvés dans des conditions difficiles.

Article 209 : Responsabilités de l’Etat
L’Etat, par le biais des organes responsables des ministères chargés des questions de la famille, de l’enfance et de la jeunesse ainsi que des structures de protection de l’enfance, veille à la réinsertion sociale des enfants.

Policies for Assistance, General

loi n°2011-26 du 09 janvier 2012 Portant prévention et répression des violences faites aux femmes

Code Penal, 2018

Article 46 : L’État répond du dommage ou de la part du dommage qui est causé à autrui par un condamné et qui résulte directement de l’application d’une décision comportant l’obligation d’accomplir un travail d’intérêt général.
L’État est subrogé de plein droit dans les droits de la victime.
L’action en responsabilité et l’action récursoire sont portées devant les tribunaux de l’ordre judiciaire.

Penalties
Penalties, Forced Labour

Code du travail, 1998

Art.303.- Sont punis d’une amende de 140.000 à 350.000 FCFA et d’un emprisonnement de deux mois à un an, ou de l’une de ces deux peines seu- lement :
a) les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions de l’article 3 sur l’interdiction du travail forcé ;
c) toute personne qui, par violence, menaces, tromperie, dol ou promesse, a contraint ou ten- té de contraindre un travailleur à se faire em- baucher contre son gré ou qui, par les mêmes moyens, a tenté de l’empêcher de se faire em- baucher ou de remplir les obligations imposées par son contrat ;

Penalties, Child Labour

Code du travail, 1998

Art.301.- Sont punis d’une amende de 14.000 à 70.000 FCFA et, en cas de récidive, d’une amende de 70.000 à 140.000 FCFA et d’un emprisonne- ment de quinze jours à deux mois, ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement :

a) les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions des articles 158, 160, 164, 165, 166, 174 et 180 ;
b) tout employeur qui a infligé des amendes ;
c) les auteurs d’infractions aux prescriptions de
l’arrêté prévu par l’article 168 ;
d) tout employeur qui ne respecte pas le repos
de la femme enceinte prévu à l’article 170 ainsi que le repos pour allaitement prévu à l’article 173 ;
e) tout employeur qui prononce ou maintient un licenciement au mépris des dispositions de l’article 171.

Code de l’enfant, 2015

DES PEINES CONTRE LA MENDICITE DES ENFANTS
Article 338 : Quiconque incite ou contraint un enfant à la mendicité, est puni de six (06) mois à deux (02) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de cent mille (100 000) à deux cent cinquante mille (250 000) francs CFA.

DES PEINES CONTRE LES AUTRES ATTEINTES
Article 353 : Est puni de six (06) mois à cinq (05) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de cent cinquante mille (150 000) à cinq cent mille (500 000) francs CFA, quiconque méconnaît, bafoue ou viole les droits de l’enfant reconnus par la présente loi.

Article 356 : Quiconque utilise un enfant dans les différentes formes de criminalité organisée, telle que prévue à l’article 196 de la présente loi, est puni de deux (02) ans à cinq (05) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de deux cent cinquante (250 000) à cinq cent mille (500 000) francs CFA.

Article 359 : Quiconque utilise un enfant pour la production ou le trafic de drogue et/ou de toutes substances psychotropes est puni de deux (02) ans à dix (10) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500 000) à un million (1 000 000) de francs CFA.

Article 360 : Sans préjudice des lois pénales prévoyant des peines plus sévères et des dispositions spécifiques de la présente loi, est puni d’une peine de six (6) mois à un (1) an d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de cinquante mille (50 000) à cent mille (100 000) francs CFA ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement, quiconque contrevient aux dispositions des articles 212, 214 et 215 de la présente loi.

Article 387 : Quiconque arrête, enlève ou fait enlever, détient ou séquestre comme otage un enfant soit pour préparer ou faciliter la commission d’un crime ou d’un délit, soit pour obtenir une rançon, ou pour nuire aux parents de l’enfant, est puni de la réclusion à perpétuité.

Article 388 : Toute personne coupable d’enlèvement d’enfant est punie de un (01) an à cinq (05) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500 000) francs à un million (1 000 000) de francs CFA.
Si l’enlèvement est fait par l’un des parents de l’enfant, la peine est la même que celle prévue dans le premier alinéa du présent article.
Si l’enfant enlevé n’est retrouvé ou s’il est retrouvé mort, la personne coupable encourt la réclusion à perpétuité.

Article 389 : Quiconque reçoit ou met en gage un enfant est puni de deux (02) ans à cinq (05) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de deux cent cinquante mille (250 000) à un million (1 000 000) de francs CFA.

Article 391 : Le père ou la mère qui, sciemment, transporte et/ou remet son enfant en vue de la traite de celui-ci ou d’une façon quelconque aide le trafiquant, encourt un emprisonnement de six (06) mois à cinq (05) ans.

Article 392 : Quiconque déplace, tente de déplacer ou accompagne un enfant pour une destination située en République du Bénin hors de la résidence de ses parents ou de la personne ayant autorité sur lui, sans accomplir les formalités administratives requises, est puni d’un emprisonnement de un (01) an à trois (03) ans et d’une amende de cinquante mille (50 000) à cinq cent mille (500 000) francs CFA.

Article 393 : Quiconque déplace ou tente de déplacer ou accompagne hors du territoire de la République du Bénin, un enfant autre que le sien ou un enfant sur lequel il a autorité sans accomplir les formalités administratives en vigueur, est puni d’un emprisonnement de deux (02) ans à cinq (05) ans et d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500 000) à deux millions cinq cent mille (2 500 000) francs CFA.

Article 394 : Est punie des peines spécifiées à l’article 393 de la présente loi, toute personne, quelle que soit sa nationalité qui, accompagnant un ou plusieurs enfants de nationalité béninoise et/ou étrangère, est trouvée sur le territoire de la République du Bénin, alors qu’elle n’y a pas sa résidence habituelle, sans remplir les conditions prévues par la présente loi.

Article 395 : Est punie d’une amende de dix mille (10 000) à cinquante mille (50 000) francs CFA, toute personne qui, ayant connaissance du déplacement frauduleux d’un enfant, s’abstient d’en informer l’autorité administrative territorialement compétente ou l’officier de police judiciaire le plus proche.

Article 396 : Quiconque se livre à la traite d’enfants encourt dix (10) ans à vingt (20) ans de réclusion. Dans tous les cas où la traite d’enfants a lieu avec recours à l’un des moyens énumérés à l’article 398 de la présente loi, ou lorsque la victime est soumise à l’un des actes prévus à l’article 399 de la présente loi, le ou les coupables sont passibles de la réclusion à perpétuité.
Le coupable est également puni de la réclusion à perpétuité, si l’enfant n’est pas retrouvé avant le prononcé de la condamnation ou est retrouvé mort.

Article 397 : Quiconque emploie sciemment en République du Bénin, la main- d’œuvre d’un enfant provenant de la traite d’enfants, quelle que soit la nature du travail, est puni d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500 000) francs à cinq millions (5 000 000) de francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement de six (06) mois à deux (02) ans ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement.

Article 398 : Le recours à la menace, à la force ou à d’autres formes de contraintes, à l’enlèvement, à la fraude, à la tromperie, à l’abus d’autorité ou à la situation de vulnérabilité, à l’offre ou à l’acceptation de paiement ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement de l’enfant ou d’une personne ayant autorité sur lui, aux fins de son exploitation, est une circonstance aggravante de la traite d’enfants qui expose son auteur au maximum de la peine prévue à l’article 396 de la présente loi.

Article 399 : Les actes de violences et voies de fait, la privation d’aliments et de soins, l’incitation à la débauche ou à la mendicité, l’attentat à la pudeur et le viol, les coups et blessures volontaires exercés ou portés sur la personne d’un enfant constituent des circonstances aggravantes de la traite d’enfants.

Article 400 : En cas de récidive, les peines prévues aux articles 391 à 397 de la présente loi, sont portées au double.

Article 401 : Les complices de la traite d’enfants sont punis des mêmes peines que celles prévues pour les auteurs.

Article 402 : Les excursions, les sorties pédagogiques et les voyages organisés par les établissements scolaires, les administrations publiques, ainsi que les déplacements rendus nécessaires pour des raisons académiques ne sont pas soumis aux dispositions de la présente loi.

Penalties, WFCL

Loi portant conditions de deplacement des mineurs et repression de la traite d’enfatns en Republique du Benin, 2006

Article 16 : Le père ou la mère qui, sciemment, a transporté et/ou a remis son enfant en vue de la traite de celui-ci ou qui a aidé d’une façon quelconque le trafiquant, encourt un emprisonnement de six (06) mois à cinq (05) ans.

Article 17: Quiconque a déplacé, tenté de déplacer ou accompagné un enfant pour une destination située en République du Bénin hors de la résidence de son père et/ou de sa mère ou de la personne ayant autorité sur lui, sans accomplir les formalités administratives requises est puni d’un emprisonnement d’un (01) an à trois (03) ans et d’une amende de
cinquante mille (50.000) francs à cinq cent rnille (500.000) francs.

Article 18: Quiconque a déplacé, tenté de déplacer ou
accompagné hors du territoire de la République du Bénin, un enfant autre
que le sien ou un enfant sur lequel il a autorité sans accomplir les formalités
administratives en vigueur, est puni d’un emprisonnement de deux (02) ans à
cinq (05) ans et d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500.000) francs à deux millions cinq cent mille (2.500.000) francs.

Article 19 : Est punie des peines spécifiées à l’article 18 de la présente loi, toute personne, quelle que soit sa nationalité qui, accompagnant un ou plusieurs enfants de nationalité étrangère, est trouvée sur le territoire de la République du Bénin, alors qu’elle n’y a pas sa résidence habituelle, sans remplir les conditions prévues à l’article 10 de la présente loi.

Article 20 : Est punie d’une amende de dix mille (10.000) francs à cinquante mille (50.000) francs, toute personne qui, ayant connaissance du déplacement frauduleux d’un enfant, s’est abstenue d’en informer l’autorité
administrative territorialement compétente ou l’officier de police judiciaire le plus proche.

Article 21 : Quiconque s’est livré à la traite est puni de la réclusion à temps de dix (10) ans à vingt (20) ans.
Dans tous les cas où la traite d’enfants a eu lieu avec recours à l’un
des moyens énumérés à l’article 23 de la présente loi ou lorsque la victime aura été soumise à l’un des actes prévus à l’article 24 ci-dessous, le ou les coupables sont passibles de la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité.
Le coupable est également puni de la réclusion criminelle à
perpétuité, si l’enfant n’a pas été retrouvé avant le prononcé de la condamnation ou a été retrouvé mort.

Article 22 : Quiconque emploie sciemment en République du Bénin, la main-d’œuvre d’un enfant provenant de la traite d’enfants, quelle que soit la nature du travail, est puni d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500.000) francs à cinq millions (5.000.000) de francs et d’un emprisonnement de six (06) mois à vingt quatre (24) mois ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement.

Article 23 : Le recours à la menace, à la force ou à d’outres formes de contraintes, à l’enlèvement, à la fraude, à la tromperie, à l’obus d’autorité ou à la situation de vulnérabilité, à l’offre ou à l’acceptation de paiement ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement de l’enfant ou d’une personne ayant autorité sur lui, aux fins de son exploitation, est une circonstance aggravante de la traite d’enfants.

Penaltlies, Human Trafficking

Code penal, 2018

Article 501 : La traite des personnes est punie de la réclusion criminelle à temps de dix (10) ans à (20) ans.
La traite des personnes est punie de la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité lorsqu’elle a entraîné ou a pour but le prélèvement d’organe.

Article 502 : Quiconque a conclu, en République du Bénin, une convention ayant pour objet d’aliéner à titre onéreux la liberté d’une tierce personne, est puni de la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité.
L’argent, les marchandises et autres objets ou valeurs reçus en exécution de la convention ou comme arrhes d’une convention à intervenir, sont confisqués.

Article 503 : Est puni de la même peine le fait d’introduire, ou tenter d’introduire en République du Bénin, des individus destinés à faire l’objet de la convention citée en l’article précédent ou de faire sortir ou tenter de faire sortir des individus de la République du Bénin en vue d’une telle convention à contracter à l’étranger.

Article 504 : Les personnes morales pour le compte ou au bénéfice desquelles une infraction de traite de personnes, de vente d’enfants, de prostitution d’enfants, de pornographie mettant en scène des enfants ou l’une des infractions prévues à la présente section a été commise par l’un de ses organes ou représentants, sont punies d’une amende de cinq millions (5.000.000) à cent millions (100.000.000) de francs CFA sans préjudice de la condamnation à des dommages-intérêts.
Les personnes morales, peuvent, en outre, être condamnées à l’une ou plusieurs des peines suivantes :

1- l’exclusion des marchés publics, à titre définitif ou pour une durée de cinq (05) ans au plus ;
2- la confiscation du bien qui a servi à commettre ou était destiné à commettre l’infraction ou du bien qui en est le produit;
3- le placement sous surveillance judiciaire pour une durée de cinq (05) ans au plus ;
4- l’interdiction, à titre définitif, ou pour une durée de cinq (05) ans au plus, d’exercer directement ou indirectement une ou plusieurs activités professionnelles ou sociales à l’occasion de laquelle l’infraction a été commise ;
5- la fermeture définitive ou pour une durée de cinq (05) ans au plus, des établissements ou de l’un des établissements de l’entreprise ayant servi à commettre les faits incriminés ;
6- la dissolution, lorsqu’elles ont été créées pour commettre les faits incriminés ;
7- l’affichage de la décision prononcée ou la diffusion de celle-ci par la presse écrite ou par tout moyen de communication audiovisuelle, aux frais de la personne morale condamnée.

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Benin. If you are a representative of Benin and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.