Data Dashboards

Brazil Dashboard
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2002 and 2015 decreased by 59%.

-59%

2002- 2015

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.754 (2015)

Mean School Years: 7.8 years (2015)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 23.1% (2013)

Working Poverty Rate: 2.2% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protections Coverage

General (at least one): 59.8% (2016)

Unemployed: 7.8% (2016)

Pension: 78.3% (2016)

Vulnerable: 42% (2016)

Children: 96.8% (2016)

Disabled: 100% (2016)

Poor: 100% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS) resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Brazil, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2002 to 2015. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Brazil, the latest estimates show that 1.5 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The number is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 5 percent in 2002. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Brazil, the latest estimates show that 10.4 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The percentage is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 21.6 percent in 2002. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2015 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Brazil was 15.1 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 16.6 hours in 2014.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2015, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 26 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2014, when the number of hours worked by this age group was 29.1.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week for children aged 5-14.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 8 hours per week according to the 2015 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2014, which found that children aged 5-14 in Brazil worked an average of 8.7 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2009 and 2011-2015.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Brazil is from 2014. By the 2014 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector and the Other Services sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Brazil.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Brazil.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data through their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Brazil between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Brazil is 0.754. This score indicates that human development is high.

 

HDI Education (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitative labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Brazil over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1990 and 2013, Brazil showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

“Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases the vulnerability of individuals to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children.”

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Brazil.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabalho Escravo (Slave Labour, Labour analogous to slavery)

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940 amend. Lei No 10.803, 2003
Redução a condição análoga à de escravo
Art. 149. Reduzir alguém à condição análoga à de escravo, quer submetendo-o a trabalhos forçados ou a jornada exaustiva, quer sujeitando-o a condições degradantes de trabalho, quer restringindo, por qualquer meio, sua locomoção em razão de dívida contraída com o empregador ou preposto:

§ 1o Nas mesmas penas incorre quem:

I – cerceia o uso de qualquer meio de transporte por parte do trabalhador, com o fim de retê-lo no local de trabalho;
II – mantém vigilância ostensiva no local de trabalho ou se apodera de documentos ou objetos pessoais do trabalhador, com o fim de retê-lo no local de trabalho.

Trabalho Infantil (Child Labour)

Consolidação das Leis do Trabalho Decreto-Lei No 5.452, 1943 amend. Lei 10.097, 2000
Art. 403. É proibido qualquer trabalho a menores de dezesseis anos de idade, salvo na condição de aprendiz, a partir dos quatorze anos.

Parágrafo único. O trabalho do menor não poderá ser realizado em locais prejudiciais à sua formação, ao seu desenvolvimento físico, psíquico, moral e social e em horários e locais que não permitam a freqüência à escola.

Piores Forma de Trabalho Infantil (Worst Forms of Child Labour)

Constituição da República Federativa do Brasil, 1988 amend. Emenda Constitucional No 20, 1998
Art. 7.XXXIII. Proibição de trabalho noturno, perigoso ou insalubre a menores de dezoito e de qualquer trabalho a menores de dezesseis anos, salvo na condição de aprendiz, a partir de quatorze anos

Consolidação das Leis do Trabalho Decreto-Lei No 5.452, 1943
Art. 404 – Ao menor de 18 (dezoito) anos é vedado o trabalho noturno, considerado este o que for executado no período compreendido entre as 22 (vinte e duas) e as 5 (cinco) horas.

Consolidação das Leis do Trabalho Decreto-Lei No 5.452, 1943 amend. Decreto-lei No 229, 1967
Art. 405. Ao menor não será permitido o trabalho:

I – nos locais e serviços perigosos ou insalubres, constantes de quadro para esse fim aprovado pelo Diretor Geral do Departamento de Segurança e Higiene do Trabalho;
II – em locais ou serviços prejudiciais à sua moralidade.

§ 2º O trabalho exercido nas ruas, praças e outros logradouros dependerá de prévia autorização do Juiz de Menores, ao qual cabe verificar se a ocupação é indispensável à sua própria subsistência ou à de seus pais, avós ou irmãos e se dessa ocupação não poderá advir prejuízo à sua formação moral.

§ 3º Considera-se prejudicial à moralidade do menor o trabalho:

a. prestado de qualquer modo, em teatros de revista, cinemas, buates, cassinos, cabarés, dancings e estabelecimentos análogos;
b. em empresas circenses, em funções de acróbata, saltimbanco, ginasta e outras semelhantes;
c. de produção, composição, entrega ou venda de escritos, impressos, cartazes, desenhos, gravuras, pinturas, emblemas, imagens e quaisquer outros objetos que possam, a juízo da autoridade competente, prejudicar sua formação moral;
d. consistente na venda, a varejo, de bebidas alcoólicas.

§ 4º Nas localidades em que existirem, oficialmente reconhecidas, instituições destinadas ao amparo dos menores jornaleiros, só aos que se encontrem sob o patrocínio dessas entidades será outorgada a autorização do trabalho a que alude § 2º.

§ 5º Aplica-se ao menor o disposto no art. 390 e seu parágrafo único.

Decreto núm. 6481, 2008 
Art. 1o Fica aprovada a Lista das Piores Formas de Trabalho Infantil (Lista TIP), na forma do Anexo, de acordo com o disposto nos artigos 3o, “d”, e 4o da Convenção 182 da Organização Internacional do Trabalho – OIT, aprovada pelo Decreto Legislativo no 178, de 14 de dezembro de 1999 e promulgada pelo Decreto no 3.597, de 12 de setembro de 2000.

Art. 2o Fica proibido o trabalho do menor de dezoito anos nas atividades descritas na Lista TIP, salvo nas hipóteses previstas neste decreto.

§ 1o A proibição prevista no caput poderá ser elidida:

I – na hipótese de ser o emprego ou trabalho, a partir da idade de dezesseis anos, autorizado pelo Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego, após consulta às organizações de empregadores e de trabalhadores interessadas, desde que fiquem plenamente garantidas a saúde, a segurança e a moral dos adolescentes; e
II – na hipótese de aceitação de parecer técnico circunstanciado, assinado por profissional legalmente habilitado em segurança e saúde no trabalho, que ateste a não exposição a riscos que possam comprometer a saúde, a segurança e a moral dos adolescentes, depositado na unidade descentralizada do Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego da circunscrição onde ocorrerem as referidas atividades.

§ 2o As controvérsias sobre a efetiva proteção dos adolescentes envolvidos em atividades constantes do parecer técnico referido no § 1o, inciso II, serão objeto de análise por órgão competente do Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego, que tomará as providências legais cabíveis.

§ 3o A classificação de atividades, locais e trabalhos prejudiciais à saúde, à segurança e à moral, nos termos da Lista TIP, não é extensiva aos trabalhadores maiores de dezoito anos.

Art. 3o Os trabalhos técnicos ou administrativos serão permitidos, desde que fora das áreas de risco à saúde, à segurança e à moral, ao menor de dezoito e maior de dezesseis anos e ao maior de quatorze e menor de dezesseis, na condição de aprendiz.

Art. 4o Para fins de aplicação das alíneas “a”, “b” e “c” do artigo 3o da Convenção no 182, da OIT, integram as piores formas de trabalho infantil:

I – todas as formas de escravidão ou práticas análogas, tais como venda ou tráfico, cativeiro ou sujeição por dívida, servidão, trabalho forçado ou obrigatório;
II – a utilização, demanda, oferta, tráfico ou aliciamento para fins de exploração sexual comercial, produção de pornografia ou atuações pornográficas;
III – a utilização, recrutamento e oferta de adolescente para outras atividades ilícitas, particularmente para a produção e tráfico de drogas; e
IV – o recrutamento forçado ou compulsório de adolescente para ser utilizado em conflitos armados.

Tráfico de Pessoas (Trafficking in Persons)

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940 amend. Lei 13.344, 2016
Art. 149A. Agenciar, aliciar, recrutar, transportar, transferir, comprar, alojar ou acolher pessoa, mediante grave ameaça, violência, coação, fraude ou abuso, com a finalidade de:

I – remover-lhe órgãos, tecidos ou partes do corpo;
II – submetê-la a trabalho em condições análogas à de escravo;
III – submetê-la a qualquer tipo de servidão;
IV – adoção ilegal; ou
V – exploração sexual.

Escravo

Lei No 3.353, 1888
Declara extinta a escravidão no Brasil. A Princesa Imperial Regente, em nome de Sua Majestade o Imperador, o Senhor D. Pedro II, faz saber a todos os súditos do Império que a Assembléia Geral decretou e ela sancionou a lei seguinte:

Art. 1°: É declarada extincta desde a data desta lei a escravidão no Brazil.
Art. 2°: Revogam-se as disposições em contrário.

International Commitments
National Strategies

2º Plano Nacional para a Erradicação do Trabalho Escravo or the II PNETE, 2008-

“Establishes the policy framework to address forced labor.

III Plano Nacional de Enfrentamento ao Tráfico de Pessoas, 2018-

2º Plano Nacional de Enfrentamento ao Tráfico de Pessoas or the II PNETP, 2013-2016

“Guides efforts to combat human trafficking, including child trafficking.

National Plan to Combat Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents, 2013–2020

“Identifies strategies to prevent the sexual exploitation of children, protect children’s rights, and assist child victims.

National Plan for the Prevention and Eradication of Child Labor and the Protection of Working Adolescents, 2011–2015

“Guided the Government’s efforts to combat child labor, including its worst forms. Although it expired in 2015, the Government continued to implement the Plan during the reporting period, and worked on drafting the next edition.

International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1957

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1965

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2001

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2000

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Accession 1966

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1966

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2004

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2004

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, Trabalho Escravo

Lei 7.998, 1990 amend. Lei 10.608, 2002
Art. 2.I. Prover assistência financeira temporária ao trabalhador desempregado em virtude de dispensa sem justa causa, inclusive a indireta, e ao trabalhador comprovadamente resgatado de regime de trabalho forçado ou da condição análoga à de escravo;

Art. 2.C. O trabalhador que vier a ser identificado como submetido a regime de trabalho forçado ou reduzido a condição análoga à de escravo, em decorrência de ação de fiscalização do Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego, será dessa situação resgatado e terá direito à percepção de três parcelas de seguro-desemprego no valor de um salário mínimo cada, conforme o disposto no § 2o deste artigo.

§ 1o O trabalhador resgatado nos termos do caput deste artigo será encaminhado, pelo Ministério do Trabalho e Emprego, para qualificação profissional e recolocação no mercado de trabalho, por meio do Sistema Nacional de Emprego – SINE, na forma estabelecida pelo Conselho Deliberativo do Fundo de Amparo ao Trabalhador – CODEFAT.
§ 2o Caberá ao CODEFAT, por proposta do Ministro de Estado do Trabalho e Emprego, estabelecer os procedimentos necessários ao recebimento do benefício previsto no caput deste artigo, observados os respectivos limites de comprometimento dos recursos do FAT, ficando vedado ao mesmo trabalhador o recebimento do benefício, em circunstâncias similares, nos doze meses seguintes à percepção da última parcela

Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Lei No 6.815, 1980 amend. Lei No 13.344, 2016
Art. 18A. Conceder-se-á residência permanente às vítimas de tráfico de pessoas no território nacional, independentemente de sua situação migratória e de colaboração em procedimento administrativo, policial ou judicial.

§ 1o O visto ou a residência permanentes poderão ser concedidos, a título de reunião familiar:

I – a cônjuges, companheiros, ascendentes e descendentes; e
II – a outros membros do grupo familiar que comprovem dependência econômica ou convivência habitual com a vítima.

§ 2o Os beneficiários do visto ou da residência permanentes são isentos do pagamento da multa prevista no inciso II do art. 125.
§ 3o Os beneficiários do visto ou da residência permanentes de que trata este artigo são isentos do pagamento das taxas e emolumentos previstos nos arts. 20, 33 e 131.

Art. 18-B. Ato do Ministro de Estado da Justiça e Cidadania estabelecerá os procedimentos para concessão da residência permanente de que trata o art. 18-A.

Art. 42-A. O estrangeiro estará em situação regular no País enquanto tramitar pedido de regularização migratória.

Penalties
Penalties, Trabalho Escravo

Constitution of the Federal Republic of Brazil, 1988 amend. Constitutional Amendment 81, 2014
Art. 243. As propriedades rurais e urbanas de qualquer região do País onde forem localizadas culturas ilegais de plantas psicotrópicas ou a exploração de trabalho escravo na forma da lei serão expropriadas e destinadas à reforma agrária e a programas de habitação popular, sem qualquer indenização ao proprietário e sem prejuízo de outras sanções previstas em lei, observado, no que couber, o disposto no art. 5º.

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940 amend. Lei No 13.344, 2016
Art. 149. Reduzir alguém a condição análoga à de escravo, quer submetendo-o a trabalhos forçados ou a jornada exaustiva, quer sujeitando-o a condições degradantes de trabalho, quer restringindo, por qualquer meio, sua locomoção em razão de dívida contraída com o empregador ou preposto:

Pena – reclusão, de dois a oito anos, e multa, além da pena correspondente à violência.

§ 1o Nas mesmas penas incorre quem:

I – cerceia o uso de qualquer meio de transporte por parte do trabalhador, com o fim de retê-lo no local de trabalho;
II – mantém vigilância ostensiva no local de trabalho ou se apodera de documentos ou objetos pessoais do trabalhador, com o fim de retê-lo no local de trabalho.

§ 2o A pena é aumentada de metade, se o crime é cometido:

I – contra criança ou adolescente;
II – por motivo de preconceito de raça, cor, etnia, religião ou origem.

Penalties, Child Labour

Consolidação das Leis do Trabalho Decreto-Lei No 5.452, 1943
Art. 434 – Os infratores das disposições dêste Capítulo ficam sujeitos à multa de valor igual a 1 (um) salário mínimo regional, aplicada tantas vêzes quantos forem os menores empregados em desacôrdo com a lei, não podendo, todavia, a soma das multas exceder a 5 (cinco) vêzes o salário-mínimo, salvo no caso de reincidência em que êsse total poderá ser elevado ao dôbro.

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940 amend. Lei No 13.344, 2016
Art. 149-A.  Agenciar, aliciar, recrutar, transportar, transferir, comprar, alojar ou acolher pessoa, mediante grave ameaça, violência, coação, fraude ou abuso, com a finalidade de: 

I – remover-lhe órgãos, tecidos ou partes do corpo
II – submetê-la a trabalho em condições análogas à de escravo;
III – submetê-la a qualquer tipo de servidão;
IV – adoção ilegal; ou
V – exploração sexual.

Pena – reclusão, de 4 (quatro) a 8 (oito) anos, e multa.
§ 1o A pena é aumentada de um terço até a metade se:

I – o crime for cometido por funcionário público no exercício de suas funções ou a pretexto de exercê-las;
II – o crime for cometido contra criança, adolescente ou pessoa idosa ou com deficiência;
III – o agente se prevalecer de relações de parentesco, domésticas, de coabitação, de hospitalidade, de dependência econômica, de autoridade ou de superioridade hierárquica inerente ao exercício de emprego, cargo ou função; ou
IV – a vítima do tráfico de pessoas for retirada do território nacional.

§ 2o A pena é reduzida de um a dois terços se o agente for primário e não integrar organização criminosa.

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940 amend. Lei No 11.106, 2005
Art. 227 – Induzir alguém a satisfazer a lascívia de outrem:
Pena – reclusão, de um a três anos.

§ 1o Se a vítima é maior de 14 (catorze) e menor de 18 (dezoito) anos, ou se o agente é seu ascendente, descendente, cônjuge ou companheiro, irmão, tutor ou curador ou pessoa a quem esteja confiada para fins de educação, de tratamento ou de guarda:
Pena – reclusão, de dois a cinco anos.

§ 2º – Se o crime é cometido com emprego de violência, grave ameaça ou fraude:
Pena – reclusão, de dois a oito anos, além da pena correspondente à violência.

§ 3º – Se o crime é cometido com o fim de lucro, aplica-se também multa.

Codigo Penal Decreto-lei No 2848, 1940
Art. 228.  Induzir ou atrair alguém à prostituição ou outra forma de exploração sexual, facilitá-la, impedir ou dificultar que alguém a abandone:
Pena – reclusão, de 2 (dois) a 5 (cinco) anos, e multa.

§ 1o  Se o agente é ascendente, padrasto, madrasta, irmão, enteado, cônjuge, companheiro, tutor ou curador, preceptor ou empregador da vítima, ou se assumiu, por lei ou outra forma, obrigação de cuidado, proteção ou vigilância:
Pena – reclusão, de 3 (três) a 8 (oito) anos.

§ 2º – Se o crime, é cometido com emprego de violência, grave ameaça ou fraude:
Pena – reclusão, de quatro a dez anos, além da pena correspondente à violência.

§ 3º – Se o crime é cometido com o fim de lucro, aplica-se também multa.

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk for exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protections: General (at Least One)
Social Protections (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protections: Unemployed
Social Protections: Pension
Social Protections: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protections: Poor
Social Protections: Children
Social Protections: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Brazil. If you are a representative of Brazil and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us at info@delta87.org.