Data Dashboards

Cabo Verde
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data with a complete statistical definition is only provided for 2001. There is no change to report.

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.651 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.2 years (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 28.8% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 1.8% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 30.4% (2016)

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 85.8% (2016)

Vulnerable: 5.6% (2016)

Children: 31.5% (2016)

Disabled: 30.3% (2016)

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Cabo Verde, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Cabo Verde, the latest estimates show that 0.2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Cabo Verde, the latest estimates show that 2.1 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2001. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Cabo Verde is from 2001. By the 2001 estimate, the Agriculturesector had the most child labourers, followed by Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors and the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector.

The chart to the left displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Cabo Verde.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Cabo Verde.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

 

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Cape Verde between 2000 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Cape Verde is 0.651. This score indicates that human development is medium. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Cape Verde over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Cabo Verde showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Cabo Verde.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Codigo Laboral, 2007

“Artigo 14o
Trabalho forçado
1. Ninguém pode ser obrigado a executar trabalho for- çado, entendendo-se como tal a obrigação imposta a uma pessoa de executar, sob a ameaça de qualquer castigo, um trabalho ou serviço para o qual não se tenha oferecido de livre vontade.
2: Não são considerados trabalhos forçados os que re- sultem de condenações judiciais, bem como os trabalhos e serviços a favor da comunidade, exigidos a qualquer pes- soa, em caso de guerra, desastres, incêndios, inundações, fome, tremor de terra, epidemias e epizootias violentas e em todas as circunstâncias que ponham em perigo ou ameacem por em perigo a vida ou as condições normais de existência da totalidade ou parte da população”

“Artigo 261o
Idade
1. Nenhum menor pode trabalhar enquanto não com- pletar a idade de escolaridade obrigatória e, em caso algum, antes de perfazer 15 anos.
2. Não constitui violação do disposto no número ante- rior a contratação de menor para actividades de repre- sentação, cinema, bailado, música e outras actividades de natureza espiritual, desde que a ocupação do menor seja devidamente acompanhada pelos pais ou quem legalmen- te o represente, e não prejudique a sua saúde, formação escolar, educação ou afecte o seu desenvolvimento físico, mental ou moral.
3. A contratação de um menor para a execução das tarefas a que se reporta o número anterior está sujeito a visto da Direcção-Geral do Trabalho, a qual pode mandar suprimir certas cláusulas do contrato, aditar ou corrigir outras e pode ainda, em despacho fundamentado, recusar o visto quando considerar que os interesses do menor não se encontram devidamente acautelados.
4. A execução do contrato sem o competente visto da Direcção-Geral do Trabalho constitui contra-ordenação punível.
5. Quando a ambos pais incumba o poder paternal, a falta de um deles constitui motivo de ilegitimidade para a obtenção de qualquer dos efeitos previstos neste artigo.”

Child Labour

Constitution 1992 revised 2010

“Article 74
(Rights of children)
1. All children shall have the right to protection by the family, by the society and by the public authorities, with a view to their full development.
2. Children shall have the right to special protection in the case of illness, orphanhood, abandonment and deprivation of a balanced family environment.
3. Children shall also have the right to special protection against:

a) Any form of discrimination and oppression;
b) Abusive exercise of authority in the family and in other institutions to which they may be entrusted;
c) Child labor exploitation;
d) Sexual abuse and exploitation.

4. Child labor shall be prohibited.
5. The law shall define the cases and conditions in which underage work may be authorized.
6. The law shall punish especially, as serious crimes, sexual abuse and exploitation as well as child trafficking.
7. The law shall punish, equally, as serious crimes extreme cruelty and other acts susceptible to affecting gravely the physical and/or psychological integrity of children.”

“Article 90
(Childhood)
1. All children shall have the right to special protection by their family, the society and by the State, that must guarantee them the conditions necessary for the full development of their physical and intellectual abilities and special care in the case of illness, abandonment or of emotional needs.
2. The family, the society and the State should guarantee the protection of a child against any form of discrimination and of oppression, as well as against the abusive exercise of authority in the family, in public or private institutions to which they may be entrusted and also against child labor exploitation.
3. Child labor shall be prohibited at compulsory school-going age.”

Decreto-Legislativo 5/2007

“Artigo 7o
Trabalhos proibidos a menores
O Membro do Governo responsável pela área de traba- lho poderá proibir, por portaria, a prestação do trabalho de menores assim como elevar os limites etários fixados no Código Laboral para determinadas modalidades de trabalho, profissões ou sectores de actividade.”

Codigo Laboral, 2007

“Artigo 261o
Idade
1. Nenhum menor pode trabalhar enquanto não com- pletar a idade de escolaridade obrigatória e, em caso algum, antes de perfazer 15 anos.
2. Não constitui violação do disposto no número ante- rior a contratação de menor para actividades de repre- sentação, cinema, bailado, música e outras actividades de natureza espiritual, desde que a ocupação do menor seja devidamente acompanhada pelos pais ou quem legalmen- te o represente, e não prejudique a sua saúde, formação escolar, educação ou afecte o seu desenvolvimento físico, mental ou moral.
3. A contratação de um menor para a execução das tarefas a que se reporta o número anterior está sujeito a visto da Direcção-Geral do Trabalho, a qual pode mandar suprimir certas cláusulas do contrato, aditar ou corrigir outras e pode ainda, em despacho fundamentado, recusar o visto quando considerar que os interesses do menor não se encontram devidamente acautelados.
4. A execução do contrato sem o competente visto da Direcção-Geral do Trabalho constitui contra-ordenação punível.
5. Quando a ambos pais incumba o poder paternal, a falta de um deles constitui motivo de ilegitimidade para a obtenção de qualquer dos efeitos previstos neste artigo.”

“Artigo 262o
Tarefas domésticas e agrícolas
Não constitui igualmente violação do disposto no núme- ro um do artigo anterior a execução de tarefas que fazem parte da formação do menor para a vida, tais como a colaboração na execução de pequenas tarefas domésticas, agrícolas ou de outra natureza que contribuam para o seu desenvolvimento físico e mental, aperfeiçoem o seu sentido de organização, fortaleçam a auto-disciplina e qualifiquem a sua relação com a família, a comunidade e o ambiente.”

“Artigo 263o
Forma
1. O contrato de trabalho celebrado com menor carece sempre de forma escrita, sob pena de nulidade
2. Além dos efeitos previstos no artigo 34o, a nulidade do contrato de trabalho celebrado com quem não pre- enchia as condições previstas neste capítulo confere ao menor direito a ser indemnizado como se tivesse sido despedido sem justa causa.”

“Artigo 266o
Duração do trabalho
1. O período normal de trabalho de menores não pode exceder 38 horas semanais e 7 diárias.
2. O período normal de trabalho de menores pode ser, porém, igual ao dos outros trabalhadores quando as tare- fas exercidos sejam de simples presença, o trabalho seja acentuadamente intermitente ou para efeitos exclusivos da formação do menor.
3. O descanso ininterrupto do menor não pode ser inferior a 12 horas diárias.”

“Artigo 267o
Trabalho nocturno e por turno
Estão interditos de prestar trabalho nocturno e por turnos, entre as 20 horas de um dia e as 7 horas do dia seguinte, os trabalhadores menores de 18 anos, a não ser que o trabalho nesse regime seja indispensável para a sua formação profissional e seja autorizada pela Direc- ção-Geral o Trabalho.
Artigo 268o
Trabalho extraordinário
O trabalho extraordinário de menores com idade com- preendida entre os 16 e os 18 anos só é consentido em caso de força maior, não podendo, porém, exceder duas horas por dia e trinta horas por ano.”

Codigo Civil, 1997

“Artigo 127o
(Direito a não trabalhar prematuramente)
1. O direito a não trabalhar prematuramente consite na faculdade conferida aos menores de não serem colocados em qual quer espécie de trabalho ou ocupação antes de terem atingido os catorze anos de idade, salvo as tarefas de carácter doméstico e desde que sejam compativeis com a sua maturidade física e mental.
2. Para efeitos do disposto no número anterior, os menores não devem, em caso algum, ser constrangidos ou autorizados a aceitar uma ocupação ou trabalho que prejudique a sua saúde ou sua educação ou que lhes entrave o seu desenvolvimento físico, mental e moral.”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Codigo Laboral, 2007

“Artigo 264o
Trabalho defeso a menor
1. Os menores não podem desempenhar actividades que não sejam conformes com o seu desenvolvimento físico e intelectual.
2. Sempre que se suscitem dúvidas sobre as condições físicas ou psíquicas de um menor para a execução de qualquer tarefa, o mesmo pode ser submetido a contro- le médico, por iniciativa própria, do empregador, dos representantes legais, ou de qualquer trabalhador da empresa.
3. Qualquer pessoa que tenha conhecimento de que um menor se encontra a prestar trabalho em condições perigosas ou insalubres ou outras condições que preju- diquem a sua saúde física ou psíquica ou, de um modo geral, com violação da legislação de trabalho relativa a menores, pode denunciar o facto à Direcção-Geral do Tra- balho ou a qualquer autoridade com vista a fazer cessar as circunstâncias ilegais da prestação de trabalho.
4. Quando a denúncia tiver sido apresentada perante outra autoridade, que não a Direcção-Geral do Trabalho, a entidade que recebeu a denúncia deve retransmiti-la acto contínuo à Direcção-Geral do Trabalho e tomar as medidas preventivas que se inscreverem na sua esfera de competência.”

Lei n.º 113/VIII/2016, de 10 de março, que aprova a Lista Nacional do Trabalho Infantil Perigoso (TIP) e regula a sua aplicaçao

“Artigo 3.o
Conceitos
Para efeitos de aplicação da presente lei, entende-se por:

a) “Trabalho Perigoso”, toda a actividade que pela sua natureza comporta intrinsecamente fatores de risco presentes no local de trabalho quer sejam de natureza física, química, biológica, ergonómica, mecânicos, organizacional e que têm ou podem ter repercussões na saúde física, psíquica e no desenvolvimento da pessoa.
b) “Trabalho Infantil Perigoso”, toda e qualquer forma de trabalho que, por sua natureza ou pelas circunstâncias em que é executado, é susceptível de prejudicar a saúde, a segurança, a educação e a moral da criança, designadamente, o seguinte:

i. Os trabalhos em que a criança fica exposta a abusos de ordem física, psicológica ou sexual;
ii. Os trabalhos subterrâneos, debaixo de água, em alturas perigosas ou em locais confinados;
iii. Os trabalhos que se realizam com máquinas, equipamentos e ferramentas perigosos, ou que impliquem a manipulação ou transporte manual de cargas pesadas;
iv. Os trabalhos realizados em meios insalubres, nos quais as crianças ficam expostas, por exemplo, a substâncias, agentes ou processos perigosos ou a temperaturas, níveis de ruído ou de vibrações prejudiciais à saúde; e
v. Os trabalhos que sejam executados em condições especialmente difíceis, como os horários prolongados ou nocturnos, ou trabalhos que retenham injustificadamente a criança em locais do empregador.”

“Artigo 4.o
Piores formas de trabalho infantil
As piores formas de trabalho infantil abrangem, designadamente:

a) Todas as formas de escravatura ou práticas similares à escravatura, tais como a venda e tráfico de crianças, a servidão por dívidas e a condição de servo, e o trabalho forçado ou obrigatório, inclusive o recrutamento forçado ou obrigatório de crianças para serem utilizadas em conflitos armados;
b) A utilização, obtenção ou oferta de uma criança para prostituição, produção de pornografia ou para espectáculos pornográficos;
c) A utilização, obtenção ou oferta de uma criança para actividades ilícitas, em particular para a produção e tráfico de drogas como definido nos tratados internacionais relevantes;
d) Trabalho que, pela sua natureza ou circunstâncias em que é realizado, causa provavelmente danos à saúde, segurança ou moral das crianças.”

“Artigo 6.o
Proibição do Trabalho Infantil Perigoso
Fica proibido o Trabalho Infantil Perigoso das crianças nas actividades descritas na Lista Nacional do TIP a que se refere o número 1 do artigo anterior.”

“Artigo 15.o
Contratos de trabalho vigentes
Os contratos de trabalho vigentes que não cumpram o disposto na presente lei devem ser convertidos ou resolvidos imediatamente, sob pena de incorrerem nas sanções previstas na lei.”

Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 2003 amend 2015

“Artigo 271.o- A
Tráfico de pessoas
1. Quem oferecer, entregar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoa para fins de exploração sexual, exploração do trabalho ou extracção de órgãos:

a) Por meio de violência, sequestro ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) Com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se da incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da vítima; ou
e) Mediante a obtenção de consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima é punido com a pena de prisão de 4 a 10 anos.

2. A mesma pena é aplicada a quem, por qualquer meio, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamento ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins e exploração sexual, exploração de trabalho ou extracção de órgãos.
3. No caso previsto no número anterior, se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do número 1 ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa é punido com pena de prisão de 6 a 12 anos.
4. Quem, mediante pagamento ou outra contrapartida, oferecer, entregar, solicitar ou aceitar menor, ou obtiver ou prestar consentimento na sua adopção, é punido com pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos.”

Slavery

Codigo Penal, 2003

“Artigo 271.°
(Escravidão)
Quem reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo, alienar, ceder ou adquirir outra pessoa ou dela se apossar com a intenção de a manter na situação de escravo será punido com pena de prisão de 6 a 12 anos.”

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1979

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1979

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2011 (minimum age specfied: 15 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Not signed

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Not signed

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Accession 1992

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Accession 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Accession 2002

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Action Plan for the Prevention and Eradication of Child Labor

“Prioritizes the eradication of child labor. Outlines specific objectives, including data collection, institutional capacity building, and enhancement of measures to prevent, protect, and remove children from involvement in child labor.”

National Plan to Combat Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents (2017–2019)

“Aims to prevent and combat the sexual exploitation of children.”

Code of Ethics Against the Sexual Exploitation of Children

“Guides and governs agencies involved in the tourism sector to combat the sexual exploitation of children and adolescents.”

Plano Nacional Contra o Trafico de Pessoas, 2018

 

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Child Labour/Children

Lei n.º 113/VIII/2016, de 10 de março, que aprova a Lista Nacional do Trabalho Infantil Perigoso (TIP) e regula a sua aplicaçao

“Artigo 10.o
Destino das coimas
O produto das coimas reverte em:

a) 15 % para o Estado;
b) 40% para a autoridade responsável pela fiscalização das condições de trabalho;
c) 45% para o Fundo de protecção às crianças ou, não existindo, para o ICCA.”

“Artigo 11.o
Sanções acessórias
Em função da gravidade da infracção e da culpa do agente, e sempre que a situação assim o justificar, pode ser determinada, como sanção acessória, a apreensão dos instrumentos utilizados na infracção, a suspensão da autorização para o exercício da actividade e o encerramento dos estabelecimentos.
Artigo 12.o
Regime geral das contra-ordenações
Em tudo o que não esteja especialmente previsto na presente lei é aplicável, subsidiariamente, o regime jurídico geral das contra-ordenações.
Artigo 13.o
Inibição do exercício do poder paternal
A violação por parte dos progenitores ou pessoa a cuja guarda a criança esteja confiada, de fato ou de direito, da proibição do exercício de trabalho infantil constitui fundamento para a inibição do exercício do poder paternal ou revogação da decisão que concedeu a guarda.”

Policies for Assistance, General

Codigo de Processo Penal, 2005

Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 2003 amend 2015

271-A.7. A vítima de tráfico de pessoas não será penalmente responsável por ter entrado ilegalmente em território nacional nem por ter participado, a qualquer título, em actividades ilícitas, na medida em que sejam consequência directa da sua situação de vítima.

 

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Codigo Laboral, 2007

“Artigo 398o
Disposição geral
1. As sanções previstas neste título não excluem a aplicação de quaisquer outras decorrentes de regimes laborais de fonte interna e internacional.
2. As sanções previstas neste Código e demais legislação aplicável, para a mesma conduta ilícita, podem ser cumu- ladas, quando sejam diversos os pressupostos e motiva- ções que determinaram a tipificação da infracção.
3. A aplicação das sanções previstas neste Código não exonera o infractor da responsabilidade disciplinar, civil ou criminal a que o facto der lugar.
4. Em tudo o que não estiver regulado neste Título é aplicável subsidiariamente o disposto no regime geral das contra-ordenações regulado pelo Diploma Legislativo no. 9/95, de 27 de Outubro.”

“Artigo 405o
Sanções gerais
1. As infracções às normas deste Código que impõem um dever de agir ou de omitir serão sancionadas nos termos seguintes:

a) Se da acção ou omissão resultar um benefício para o infractor, como seja, uma deslocação patrimonial do património alheio para o pa- trimónio do infractor, ou uma não deslocação patrimonial do património do infractor para o património de terceiro, quando este a tal estaria obrigado, a infracção será sancionada até ao dobro do benefício alcançado;
b) Se da acção ou omissão resultar um prejuízo para terceiros a infracção será sancionada até ao equivalente ao prejuízo causado;
c) Seainfracçãoconsistirnainobservânciadeuma obrigação legal decorrente de normas de polí- cia económica, fiscal, organizacional ou outra, como sejam as comunicações obrigatórias, o envio de relatórios, a adopção ou sujeição a aprovação de regulamentos ou outros instru- mentos de equivalente natureza, a infracção será sancionada com a coima de 0,2% até 2% do capital social da empresa;
d) Se a infracção consistir no incumprimento de deveres para com a Segurança Social e desse incumprimento resultar prejuízo económico para esta entidade, a infracção será sancionada com a coima até ao equivalente ao prejuízo causado.

2. A coima aplicada nos termos do número anterior não poderá, em caso algum, contrariar os limites mínimos e máximos previstos na lei geral, sem prejuizo do disposto no no 2 do artigo 26o do Decreto-Legislativo no 9/95, de 27 de Outubro.”

“Artigo 408o
Exploração de mão-de-obra infantil
Aquele que com intenção de alcançar para si ou para terceiro vantagem patrimonial e fora das situações per- mitidas por lei, explorar a mão de obra infantil para a execução de tarefas proibidas por este código, abusando da situação de inexperiência, de necessidade ou de de- pendência do menor, é punido com coima equivalente até um ano da retribuição que competiria a um trabalhador adulto nas circunstâncias do menor.”

Penalties, Worst Forms of Child Labour

Lei n.º 113/VIII/2016, de 10 de março, que aprova a Lista Nacional do Trabalho Infantil Perigoso (TIP) e regula a sua aplicaçao

“Artigo 7.o
Dever de denúncia
Constitui dever indeclinável de todo o cidadão denunciar às autoridades competentes todas as situações que presenciar ou de alguma forma tenha conhecimento e que possam configurar a prática e o exercício de TIP.”

“Artigo 9.o
Contra-ordenações e coimas
1. Sem prejuízo da responsabilidade civil e criminal que ao caso couber, constitui contra-ordenação:
a) A violação das alíneas a), b) e c) do artigo 4.o;
b) A violação do disposto no artigo 6.o, conjugado com a alínea d) do artigo 4.o, salvo quando os infractores sejam os progenitores ou quem tenha a guarda, de fato ou de direito, da criança.
2. As contra-ordenações previstas no número anterior são punidas com coima de 10.000$00 (dez mil escudos) a 300.000$00 (trezentos mil escudos) ou de 50.000$000 (cinquenta mil escudos) a 4.000.000$00 (quatro milhões de escudos), conforme o infractor for, respectivamente, pessoa singular ou colectiva.
3. Em caso de reincidência, os limites mínimo e máximo da coima são elevados em um terço do respectivo valor, não podendo a coima efectivamente aplicada ser inferior ao valor da coima aplicada na infracção anterior.
4. Na determinação do montante da coima aplicável tem-se em consideração a gravidade da conduta violadora do direito da criança, o grau do risco a que a mesma é exposta, assim como as condições económico-financeiras do responsável.
5. A tentativa e a negligência são sempre puníveis, nos termos da lei.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 2003 amend 2015

“Artigo 271.o- A
Tráfico de pessoas
1. Quem oferecer, entregar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoa para fins de exploração sexual, exploração do trabalho ou extracção de órgãos:

a) Por meio de violência, sequestro ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) Com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se da incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da vítima; ou
e) Mediante a obtenção de consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima é punido com a pena de prisão de 4 a 10 anos.

2. A mesma pena é aplicada a quem, por qualquer meio, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamento ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins e exploração sexual, exploração de trabalho ou extracção de órgãos.
3. No caso previsto no número anterior, se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do número 1 ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa é punido com pena de prisão de 6 a 12 anos.
4. Quem, mediante pagamento ou outra contrapartida, oferecer, entregar, solicitar ou aceitar menor, ou obtiver ou prestar consentimento na sua adopção, é punido com pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos.
5. Quem, tendo conhecimento da prática de crime previsto nos números 1 e 2, utilizar os serviços ou órgãos da vítima é punido com pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
6. Quem retiver, ocultar, danificar ou destruir documentos de identificação ou de viagem de pessoa vítima de crime previsto nos números 1 e 2 é punido com pena de prisão de até 3 anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
7. A vítima de tráfico de pessoas não será penalmente responsável por ter entrado ilegalmente em território nacional nem por ter participado, a qualquer título, em actividades ilícitas, na medida em que sejam consequência directa da sua situação de vítima.”

Penalties, Slavery

Codigo Penal, 2003

“Artigo 271.°
(Escravidão)
Quem reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo, alienar, ceder ou adquirir outra pessoa ou dela se apossar com a intenção de a manter na situação de escravo será punido com pena de prisão de 6 a 12 anos.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Not signed

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Cabo Verde. If you are a representative of Cabo Verde and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.