Data Dashboards

Chad
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2004 and 2015 decreased by 22%.

-22%

2003- 2013

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF Data
  • Forced labour: No Nationally Representative Data
  • Human trafficking: No Nationally Representative Data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.396 (2015)

Mean School Years: 2.3 years (2015)

Labour Indicators

Working Poverty Rate: 19.3% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2009
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: No data

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes: 

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Chad, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2004 to 2015. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2004 and 2015. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use the same/a reduced definition.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Chad, the latest estimates show that 1 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The number is higher than in 2010, but has decreased from 4.8 percent in 2000. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use the same/a reduced definition. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data is provided for 2000, 2004, 2010 and 2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Chad, the latest estimates show that 3.3 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The percentage is lower than the estimates of 13.6 percent of children aged 15-17 engaged in hazardous work in 2004. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use the same/a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous work by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data is provided for 2004 and 2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 8 hours per week.

According to the latest 2015 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Chad was 10.1 hours. The average number of hours worked has increased from 7.6 hours in 2010.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data is provided for 2000, 2004, 2010 and 2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2015, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 11.4 hours per week. This number has increased since 2010, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 8.3.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2004, 2010 and 2015. 

Weekly Hours in Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 12.4 hours per week according to the 2015 estimate. This estimate represents an increase  in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2010, which found that children aged 5-14 in Chad worked an average of 11.5 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data is provided for 2000, 2004, 2010 and 2015.

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Chad.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Chad.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Chad between 2000 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Chad is 0.396. This score indicates that human development is low.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Chad over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants. 

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children.”

 As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Chad.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Code du Travail, 1996

Art.5.- Le travail forcé ou obligatoire est interdit. On entend par travail forcé ou obligatoire tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de son plein gré. Toutefois, le terme « travail forcé ou obligatoire » ne compren- dra pas, aux fins de la présente loi:

a) tout travail ou service exigé en vertu des lois sur le service militaire obligatoire et ayant un caractère purement militaire;

b) tout travail ou service faisant partie des obligations civiques normales des citoyens d’un pays se gouvernant pleinement lui- même;

c) tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu comme conséquence d’une condamnation pro- noncée par une décision judiciaire à la condi- tion que ce travail ou service soit exécuté sous la surveillance et le contrôle des autorités pu- bliques et que ledit individu ne soit pas concé- dé ou mis à la disposition des particuliers, compagnies ou personnes morales privées;

d) tout travail ou service exigé dans le cas de force majeure, c’est-à-dire dans le cas de guerre, de sinistres ou menaces de sinistres tels qu’incendies, inondations, famines, tremble- ments de terre, épidémies et épizooties violen- tes, invasions d’animaux, d’insectes et de para- sites végétaux nuisibles, et en général toutes circonstances mettant en danger ou risquant de mettre en danger la vie ou les conditions nor- males d’existence de l’ensemble ou d’une par- tie de la population.

e) les menus travaux de villages, c’est-à-dire les travaux exécutés dans l’intérêt direct de la collectivité par les membres de celle-ci, tra- vaux qui, de ce chef, peuvent être considérés comme des obligations civiques normales in- combant aux membres de la collectivité, à condition que la population, elle ou ses repré- sentants directs, ait le droit de se prononcer sur le bien fondé de ces travaux et se soit offerte spontanément.

Child Labour

Code du Travail, 1996

Art.52.- Les enfants ne peuvent être employés dans une profession quelconque avant l’âge de quatorze ans sauf dérogations fixées par décret sur proposition du Ministre chargé du Travail et de la Sécurité Sociale et du Ministre chargé de la Santé Publique, compte tenu des tâches qui peuvent être demandées à ces enfants.

Les enfants ne peuvent être engagés qu’avec l’accord de leur représentant légal.

Decret n 55/PR-MTJS-DTMOPS relatif au travail des enfants, 1969

Art 1. Aucun enfant de moins de 14 ans ne peut être employé, même comme apprenti, dans une entreprise du territoire de la République du Tchad. Les établissements oû ne sont employés que les membres de la famille sous l’autorité du père, de la mère ou du tuteur, ne sont pas visés par cette interdiction.

Art 2. Cette limite est toutefois fixée à 12 ans pour les travaux suivants:

a)Travaux légers domestiques correspondant aux emplois de marmiton, aide-cuisinier, petit-boy, gardien d’enfants;

b) Travaux de cueillette, de ramassage, de triage exécutés dans les exploitations agricoles;

c) Travaux légers à caractére autre qu’industriel sous réserve de l’autorisation de l’Inspecteur du Travail.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Code du Travail, 1996

Art.206.- Le travail de nuit des enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans est interdit.

Decret n 55/PR-MTJS-DTMOPS relatif au travail des enfants, 1969

Art. 6—Il est interdit d’employer les jeues travailleurs de moins de 18 ans aux travaux suivants:

1) Graissage, nettoyage, visite ou réparation des machines ou mécanismes en marche;

2) Travaux nécessitant la présence ou le passage dans un local où se trouvent des machines actionnées à la main ou par moteur animal ou mécanique, des moteurs, transmissions et mécanismes dont les parties dangereuses ne sont point couvertes d’organes protecteurs appropriés;

3) Conduite ou manœuvre d’appareils de levage ou de manutention;

4) Manipulations et emploi de matières explosives, irritantes, corrosives ou vénéneuses;

5) Travail des abattoirs, équarrissage, boyauderies, tanneries, etc.;

6) Extraction de minerais, stériles, matériaux et déblais dans les mines, minières et carrières, ainsi que danss les travaux de terrassement;

7) Travaux de soutiers, chauffeurs, conducteurs de moteurs,véhicules et engins mécaniques;

8) Tous travaux exécutés pendant les heures de nuit;

9) Tous travaux qui, même s’ils ne tombent pas sous l’article des lois pénales sont de nature à blesser leur moralité.

Art. 7—Il est interdit d’employer les jeues travailleurs de moins de 16 ans aux travaux suivants:

1) Travail moteur au moyen de pédales, roues, manivelles, leviers, manœuvres de jigs et tables à secousses mus à la main ou au pied;

2) Usage et alimentation des scies circulaires ou à rubans, ou à lance multiples, travail sur cisailles ou tranchantes mécaniques et aux meules;

3) Travaux du bâtiment, à l’exclusion de finitions ne nécessitant pas l’emploi d’échafaudage.

Art. 10—Les jeunes travailleurs de moins de 18 ans ne peuvent porter, trainer ou pousser, tant à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur des établissements, des charges d’un poids supérieur aux poids suivants:

1) Port des Fardeaux:

garçons de 14 et 15 ans…………10 kg
de 16 et 17 ans……………………..15 kg
filles de 16 et 17 ans……………..10 kg

2) Transport sur brouette (véhicule compris):

garçons de 14 et 15 ans………..35 kg
de 16 et 17 ans…………………….45 kg
filles de 16 et 17 ans…………….35 kg

3) Transport sur véhicule à 3 et 4 roues (véhicule compris):

garçons de 14 et 15 ans………….54 kg
de 16 et 17 ans……………………..60 kg
filles de 16 et 17 ans……………..45 kg

Les transports de toute charge sur diables ou véhicules analogues est interdit aux jeunes travailleurs de moins de 18 ans.

Human Trafficking

Ordonnance N° 006/PR/2018 Portant Lutte Contre la Traite des Personnes en République du Tchad

Traite des personnes désigne le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hérbergement ou l’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par l’enlèvement, la fraude, la tromperie, l’abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation des paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre, aux fins d’exploitation.

Slavery

Constitution de la République du Tchad, 2005

Article 20. Nul ne peut être tenu en esclavage ou en servitude.

International Commitments

Governments take action that assists victims and prevents or ends perpetration of modern slavery, forced labour, child labour and human trafficking. These actions should be considered in efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, Human trafficking

Ordonnance N° 006/PR/2018 Portant Lutte Contre la Traite des Personnes en République du Tchad

TITRE III: De L’IDENTICATION, DE LA PREVENTION, DE LA PROTECTION ET DE L’ASSISTANCE AUX VICTIMES, TEMOINS ET DENONCIATEURS DE LA TRAITE DES PERSONNES

CHAPITRE I- DES DISPOSITIONS PROCEDURALES

Article 38: Les victimes reçoivent, de la part des officiers de police judiciare, des procureurs de la République, des juges d’instruction, des juges pour enfants, des informations sur la nature de la protection, de l’assistance et de l’appui auxquels elles ont droit et les possibilités d’assistance et d’appui offertes par des organisations non gouvernementales et d’autres organismes d’aide aux victimes, ainsi que des informations sur les procédures pénales les concernant.

CHAPITRE III: DE L’ASSISTANCE AUX VICTIMES

Article 41: Les autorités judiciaires et administratives compétentes et les prestataires de services fournissent une assistance aux victimes de la traite des personnes. Toute personne qui prétend être victime de traite ou qui est identifiée comme telle, devra être orientée vers les services d’assistance appropriés.

Dans le cas ou aucune enquête n’est ouverte, il appartient aux services d’assistance en question de déterminer si la personne doit bénéficier d’assistance, en tenant compte de l’examen de sa situation.

L’accès à l’assistance ne peut en aucun cas être conditionne par la reconnaissance du statut de ces victimes au regard de la législation sur l’immigration, ou par la capacité ou la volonté de la victime de participer à l’enquête ou aux poursuites visant l’auteur de la traite.

Lorsqu’une enquête est ouverte, l’accès à l’assistance est accordé d’office par le Procureur de la République.

Lorsqu’une information judiciare est ouverte, l’accès à l’assistance est accordé par le juge d’instruction ou le juge pour enfants après avis du Procureur de la République. Il
peut également être ordonné par la juridiction de jugement à l’occasion du procès pénal.

Dans le cas où, suite à une enquête ou un procès, il est conclu que la personne n’est pas victime de traite, le droit à l’assistance d’office cesse. Il revient alors aux prestataires de services de décider du bien-fondé de poursuivre les mesures d’assistance au vu de l’examen de la situation de la personne.

Article 42: L’assistance visée à l’article 41 doit comprendre:

1. un logement sûr et convenable;
2. des soins et traitements médicaux, dont un dépistage volontaire et confidentiel du VIH/SIDA et d’autres maladies sexuellement transmissibles;
3. des conseils et une aide psychologique et sociale fournis à titre confidentiel;
4. des informations concernant l’assistance juridique et judiciaire;
5. la régularisation de son statut au regard de la légistlation sur l’immigration;
6. les services d’assistance recourent, au besoin, à l’interprétariat selon les mêmes modalités que celles prévues à l’article 39 de la présente ordonnance;
7. toute autre forme d’assistance nécessaire en fonction de l’état des besoins urgents de la victime.

Tous les services d’assistance sont fournis avec l’accord de la victime dûment informée, en prenant en compte les besoins spécifiques des personnes en situation vulnérable, et notamment des enfants.

Article 43: L’assistance concerne les victimes de traite identifiées sur le territoire tchadien comme les victimes tchadiennes identifiées dans un autre pays et rapatriés au Tchad.

L’assistance peut également être fournie aux personnes à charge accompagnant la victime. Elle est accordée d’office aux enfants de la personne victime de traite qui l’accompagnent.

Article 44: En aucun cas, les victimes de la traite est apportée et organisée selon les modalités générales prévues pour les enfants victimes par les textes législatifs et réglementaires de protection en vigeur.

Le placement des enfants victimes est prononcé selon les modalités générales prévues par les textes législatifs et réglementaires de protection en vigeur en République du Tchad.

Le suivi des mesures d’assistance aux enfants victimes de traite des personnes est effectué par le juge pour enfants en collaboration avec les services compétents, selon les modalités prévues par les textes législatifs et réglementaires de protection en vigeur en République du Tchad. “

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Code du Travail, 1996

Art.190.- Sont punis d’une amende de 147.000 à 294.000 F CFA et, en cas de récidive, d’une amende de 147.000 à 882.000 F CFA et d’un emprisonnement de six jours à trois mois, ou de cette dernière peine seulement les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions des articles 5 et 52, alinéa 1.

Dans le cas d’infraction à l’article 52, alinéa 1, les pénalités ne sont pas encourues si l’infraction a été l’effet d’une erreur portant sur l’âge des enfants, non imputable à l’employeur.

Penalties, General

Code Pénal, 2017

Art.331.‐ Les peines prévues aux articles 327, 328, 329 et 330 ci‐dessus sont doublées:

a) en cas de menaces, recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou de mise à profit d’une situation de vulnérabilité ou d’exploitation;
b) lorsque l’auteur des faits est une personne appelée, de par ses fonctions, à participer à la lutte contre l’esclavage, le trafic, le gage et la traite des personnes ou au maintien de la paix ;
c) lorsque l’infraction est commise en bande organisée ou par une association de malfaiteurs ;
d) lorsque l’infraction est commise avec l’usage d’une arme ;
e) lorsque la victime a subi des blessures telles que définies à l’article 307 du présent Code ou lorsqu’elle est décédée des suites des actes liés à ces faits.

Art.332.‐ Les auteurs, coauteurs et complices des infractions d’esclavage, de trafic, gage et traite des personnes sont, en outre condamnés aux peines complémentaires prévues par l’article 28 du présent Code.

Art.288.- Sont punis d’une amende de 14.000 à 73.500 F CFA et en cas de récidive, d’une amende de 73.500 à 147.000 F CFA les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions des articles 198, 223, 226, 227, 228, 252, 259, 261, 263, 265, 281, 282, et 286.

Les mêmes peines sont encourues par les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions des décrets prévus par les articles 194, 195, 196, 197, 200, 209 et 211.

Les mêmes peines sont également encourues par les employeurs qui ne respectent pas les clauses de salaire contenues dans les conventions collectives, qui leur sont applicables ainsi que ceux qui ne respectent pas l’obligation d’affichage prévue à l’article 279.

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ordonnance N° 006/PR/2018 Portant Lutte Contre la Traite des Personnes en République du Tchad

TITRE II: DES INCRIMINATIONS ET DES SANCTIONS

CHAPITRE I: DE LA TRAITE DES PERSONNES
Section 1: De l’infraction de la traite des personnes
Article 6:

1. La traite des personnes est un crime.

2. Est coupable de traite des personnes, quiconque, par le moyen de la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou d’autres formes de contrainte, l’enlèvement, la fraude, la tromperie, l’abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre, participe intentionnellement, aux fins d’exploitation d’une personne, à l’acte suivant, sans qu’il ne soit nécessaire qu’il soit partie prenante à chacun des élément de cet acte: recrutement, transport, transfert, hébergement, accueil de cette personne.

Lorsque la victime de l’infraction est un enfant, l’infraction de traite des personnes est constituée même en l’absence des moyens prévus au présent article.

Le consentement, l’accord, l’implication ou la participation des représentants légaux de la victime ou de toute autre personne ayant autorité sur la victime à la commission de l’infraction ne peut constituer ni une cause d’exonération de la responsabilité ni une circonstance atténuante pour l’auteur de l’infraction.

Article 7: Est puni d’une peine de quatre (04) ans à trente (30) ans, et d’une amende de deux cent cinquante mille (250.000) à Cinq millions (5.000.000) FCFA, quiconque commet l’infraction de traite des personnes, prévue à l’article 6 alinéa 2 de la présente Ordonnance.

Article 8: Est puni de l’emprisonnement à vie, quiconque commet l’infraction de traite des personnes accompagnée de l’une quelconque des circonstances aggravantes suivantes:

1. l’infraction de traite ayant entraîné la mort de la victime ou d’un tiers y compris la mort par suicide ou la contraction par la victime d’une maladie mortelle dont le VIH/SIDA;
2. l’infraction ayant été commise en recourant à des tortures ou des actes de barbarie;
3. l’infraction ayant été commise dans le cadre des activités d’une association de malfaiteurs.

Article 9: Est puni d’une peine d’amende de 50 000 000 à 500 000 000 de francs FCFA et de l’une ou plusieurs des peines complémentaires suivantes, toute personne morale coupable de l’infraction de traite des personnes prévue à l’article 6 alinéa 2 ci-dessus:

1. des mesures d’exclusion du bénéfice d’un avantage ou d’une aide publiques;
2. le placement sous surveillance judiciare;
3. la mesure judiciare de dissolution;
4. la fermeture temporaire ou dêfinitive de l’établissement ayant servi à commettre l’infraction.

Dans tous les cas, les jurdicitons ordonneront la publication et l’affichage de la décision de condamnation.

Article 10: La peine complémentaire de confiscation des biens est appliquée aux personnes physiques et morales, auteurs de l’infraction de traite.

Article 11: Toute condamnation de traite emporte interdiction de tout ou partie de l’exercice des droits civiques, civils et de famille suivants:

1. de vote et d’élection;
2. d’éligibilité;
3. d’être appelé ou nommé aux fonctions de juré ou aux autres fonctions publiques, ou aux emplois de l’Administration, ou d’exercer ces fonctions ou emplois;
4. du port d’armes;
5. de vote et de suffrage dans les délibérations de famille;
6. d’être tuteur, curateur, si ce n’est de ses enfants et sur l’avis seulement de la famille;
7. d’être expert ou employé comme témoin dans les actes;
8. de témigner en justice, autrement que pour y faire de simples déclarations.

Le coupable, s’ill est étranger, est condamné à une interdiction d’ entrée et de séjour en terrirtoire national pendant dix (10) ans à compter de l’expiration de la peine encourue.

Article 12: Toute personne qui a tenté de commettre l’infraction de traite est exempte de peine si, ayant averti et collaboré effectivement avec l’autorité administrative ou judiciaire, elle a permis d’éviter la réalisation de l’infraction et d’identifier, le cas échéant, les autres auteurs ou complices.

Article 13: Le complice de l’infraction de traite est puni selon les modalités de repression de la complicité prévues par le Code Pénal.

Article 14: Une victime de la traite des personnes est exonerée de responsabilité pénale ou administrative et ne peut être retenue ou détenue.”

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled