Data Dashboards

Colombia Dashboard
Measurement

Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2003 and 2005 decreased by 18%.

-18%

2003-2005

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF Data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.727 (2015)

Mean School Years: 7.6 years (2015)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 47.9% (2013)

Working Poverty Rate: 3.14% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2005
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protections Coverage

General (at least one): 40.8% (2016)

Unemployed: 4.6% (2016)

Pension: 51.7% (2016)

Vulnerable: 14.1% (2016)

Children: 27.3% (2016)

Disabled: 6% (2016)

Poor: 22.8% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS) resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes: 

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Colombia, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2000 to 2015. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Colombia, the latest estimates show that 0.2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The number is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 1.4 percent in 2001. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001 and 2014.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Colombia, the latest estimates show that 7.1 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The percentage is higher than in 2014, but has decreased from 10.5 percent in 2001. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2015 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Colombia was 15.7 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 15.8 hours in 2014.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001.

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2015, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 27 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2014, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 28.9.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 5.9 hours per week according to the 2015 estimate. This estimate represents an increase in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2014, which found that children aged 5-14 in Colombia worked an average of 5.8 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2001.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Colombia  is from 2015. By the 2015 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector and Manufacturing sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Colombia.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Colombia.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

 

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Colombia between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Colombia is 0.727. This score indicates that human development is high.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Colombia over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1995 and 2013, Colombia showed an increase in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children.”

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Colombia.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajos o servicios forzados (Forced labour and services)

Resolucion 3597, 2013
Art. 5. Actividades que se Constituyen en Conductas Punibles. Para efectos de la presente resolución, cualquier actividad que pueda catalogarse como:

1. Formas de esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, como la venta y la trata de niños, la servidumbre por deudas y la condición de siervo y el trabajo forzoso u obligatorio, incluido el reclutamiento forzoso u obligatorio de niños para utilizarlos en conflictos armados.

Ley 599, 2000 amend. Ley 985, 2005
Art. 188.A. Trata de personas. El que capte, traslade, acoja o reciba a una persona [penalties].
Para efectos de este artículo se entenderá por explotación el obtener provecho económico o cualquier otro beneficio para sí o para otra persona, mediante la explotación de la prostitución ajena u otras formas de explotación sexual, los trabajos o servicios forzados, la esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, la servidumbre, la explotación de la mendicidad ajena, el matrimonio servil, la extracción de órganos, el turismo sexual u otras formas de explotación.
El consentimiento dado por la víctima a cualquier forma de explotación definida en este artículo no constituirá causal de exoneración de la responsabilidad penal.

Trabajo infantil (Child Labour)

Ley 1098, 2006
Art. 20. Derechos de protección. Los niños, las niñas y los adolescentes serán protegidos contra:

2. La explotación económica por parte de sus padres, representantes legales, quienes vivan con ellos, o cualquier otra persona. Serán especialmente protegidos contra su utilización en la mendicidad.
3. El consumo de tabaco, sustancias psicoactivas, estupefacientes o alcohólicas y la utilización, el reclutamiento o la oferta de menores en actividades de promoción, producción, recolección, tráfico, distribución y comercialización.
4. La violación, la inducción, el estímulo y el constreñimiento a la prostitución; la explotación sexual, la pornografía y cualquier otra conducta que atente contra la libertad, integridad y formación sexuales de la persona menor de edad.
5. El secuestro, la venta, la trata de personas y el tráfico y cualquier otra forma contemporánea de esclavitud o de servidumbre.
6. Las guerras y los conflictos armados internos.

Art. 35. Edad Mínima de Admisión al Trabajo y Derecho a la Protección Laboral de los Adolescentes Autorizados para Trabajar.

La edad mínima de admisión al trabajo es los quince (15) años. Para trabajar, los adolescentes entre los 15 y 17 años requieren la respectiva autorización expedida por el Inspector de Trabajo o, en su defecto, por el Ente Territorial Local y gozarán de las protecciones laborales consagrados en el régimen laboral colombiano, las normas que lo complementan, los tratados y convenios internacionales ratificados por Colombia, la Constitución Política y los derechos y garantías consagrados en este código.
Los adolescentes autorizados para trabajar tienen derecho a la formación y especialización que los habilite para ejercer libremente una ocupación, arte, oficio o profesión y a recibirla durante el ejercicio de su actividad laboral.

Paragrafo. Excepcionalmente, los niños y niñas menores de 15 años podrán recibir autorización de la Inspección de Trabajo, o en su defecto del Ente Territorial Local, para desempeñar actividades remuneradas de tipo artístico, cultural, recreativo y deportivo. La autorización establecerá el número de horas máximas y prescribirá las condiciones en que esta actividad debe llevarse a cabo. En ningún caso el permiso excederá las catorce (14) horas semanales.

Las peores formas de trabajo infantil (Worst Forms of Child Labour)

Ley 1098, 2006
Art. 20. Derechos de protección. Los ninos, las ninas y los adolescentes serán protegidos contra:

12. El trabajo que por su naturaleza o por las condiciones en que se lleva a cabo es probable que pueda afectar la salud, la integridad y la seguridad o impedir el derecho a la educación.
13. Las peores formas de trabajo infantil, conforme al Convenio 182 de la OIT.

Resolucion 3597, 2013
Art. 2. Peores Formas de Trabajo Infantil. Se consideran como peores formas de trabajo infantil, conforme al Convenio 182 de la OIT, aprobado por la Ley 704 de 2001, entre otras, las siguientes:

1. Todas las formas de esclavitud y prácticas similares, tales como la venta y el tráfico de niños y adolescentes, la servidumbre por deudas y la condición de siervo y el trabajo forzoso u obligatorio, incluido el reclutamiento de menores de 18 años de edad, para utilizarlos en conflictos armados.
2. La utilización, el reclutamiento o la oferta de niños y adolescentes para la prostitución o cualquier actividad relacionada con la pornografía.
3. La utilización, el reclutamiento o la oferta de niños y adolescentes para la realización de actividades ilícitas, en particular, la producción y el tráfico de estupefacientes, tal como se definen en los tratados internacionales pertinentes.
4. El trabajo que por su naturaleza o por las condiciones en que se lleva a cabo puede afectar la salud, la seguridad o la moralidad de los niños y adolescentes. Para efectos de la presente resolución, estas actividades están contempladas en los artículos 3o y 4o.

Trata de Personas (Trafficking in Persons)

Ley 599, 2000 amend. Ley 985, 2005
Art. 188.A. Trata de personas. El que capte, traslade, acoja o reciba a una persona [penalties].

Para efectos de este artículo se entenderá por explotación el obtener provecho económico o cualquier otro beneficio para sí o para otra persona, mediante la explotación de la prostitución ajena u otras formas de explotación sexual, los trabajos o servicios forzados, la esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, la servidumbre, la explotación de la mendicidad ajena, el matrimonio servil, la extracción de órganos, el turismo sexual u otras formas de explotación.
El consentimiento dado por la víctima a cualquier forma de explotación definida en este artículo no constituirá causal de exoneración de la responsabilidad penal.

Esclavitud (Slavery)

Constitución Política de Colombia, 1991
Art. 17. Se prohíben la esclavitud, la servidumbre y la trata de seres humanos en todas sus formas.

Resolucion 3597, 2013
Art. 5. Actividades que se Constituyen en Conductas Punibles. Para efectos de la presente resolución, cualquier actividad que pueda catalogarse como:

1. Formas de esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, como la venta y la trata de niños, la servidumbre por deudas y la condición de siervo y el trabajo forzoso u obligatorio, incluido el reclutamiento forzoso u obligatorio de niños para utilizarlos en conflictos armados.

National Strategies

Child Labor Pact, 2014-2018

“Aims to reformulate policies on the prevention and eradication of child labor and include them in national strategies; improve coordination among the MOL and other government agencies, the ILO, and industry associations; raise awareness of child labor issues in capital cities and tourist destinations; and train department-level officials on laws related to child labor and services available to victims”

National Development Plan (Todos por un Nuevo País), 2014–2018

“Outlines Colombia’s strategy to promote inclusive economic growth and national development. Seeks to improve access to quality education, lengthen the school day to 7 hours, and provide preschool for children under age 5. “In 2016, included a new requirement that the child labor survey be conducted annually.”

Estrategia Nacional para la Lucha Contra la Trata de Personas, 2016-2018

“Aims to prevent human trafficking by raising awareness to detect potential victims, provide immediate assistance to victims, promote inter-institutional collaboration, strengthen and develop international cooperation mechanisms, and develop a data-gathering mechanism. Established by Decree No. 1036 in 2016 and led by the Interagency Committee to Combat Trafficking in Persons.”

International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1969

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1963

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2001

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2005

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1991

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2005

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2003

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance

Decreto 1069, 2014
Artículo 3°. Principios. Son principios rectores en las competencias, beneficios, procedimientos, trámites y demás acciones que sean pertinentes en la ruta de atención y protección, los consagrados constitucionalmente y:

1. Buena Fe. Las actuaciones de los particulares y de las autoridades públicas deberán ceñirse a los postulados de lealtad, la cual se presumirá en todas las gestiones que se adelanten con relación a los trámites y procedimientos establecidos en el presente decreto.
2. Dignidad. Las autoridades públicas y los particulares deberán garantizar el derecho a la vida humana en condiciones dignas, como principio fundante de todo ordenamiento jurídico, para lo cual propenderá porque las víctimas del delito de trata de personas tengan la posibilidad de autodeterminarse para el desarrollo de su proyecto de vida.
3. Participación. Las víctimas de la trata de personas tienen derecho a ser oídas y participar en todo programa que se dirija a satisfacer el retorno, la seguridad, el alojamiento, la asistencia médica y psicológica, la asesoría jurídica, la educación, la capacitación y la búsqueda de empleo o la generación de ingresos.
4. Intimidad. Las autoridades públicas adoptarán medidas para garantizar el respeto del derecho a la intimidad de las víctimas y, por tanto, solo podrán pedir aquella información relativa a la vida privada de las personas cuyo conocimiento resulte estrictamente indispensable para los fines establecidos en este decreto. Así mismo, comprende la obligación de las entidades y organismos de no revelar información personal de la víctima, garantizando la protección a la identidad.
5. Confidencialidad de la información. Las autoridades públicas adoptarán medidas para garantizar la confidencialidad de la información proporcionada por la víctima de la trata de personas y la obtenida en las acciones del programa de asistencia y protección.
6. Interés superior de los niños, las niñas y los adolescentes. Se entiende por interés superior del niño, niña y adolescente, el imperativo que obliga a todas las personas a garantizar la satisfacción integral y simultánea de todos sus derechos humanos, que son universales, prevalentes e interdependientes.
7. Igualdad y no discriminación. Las autoridades públicas garantizarán la atención y protección a las víctimas de la trata de personas sin distinción de raza, etnia, identidad de género, orientación sexual, cultura, edad, origen nacional, lengua, religión, opinión política o filosófica, condición física, psicológica, social o económica, entre otras, de tal manera que se deben abstener de realizar cualquier comportamiento que tenga como objetivo o consecuencia crear un entorno intimidatorio, hostil, degradante, humillante u ofensivo, en razón de ser víctima de la trata de personas.
8. Información. Las víctimas del delito de la trata de personas, durante todas las etapas del proceso de asistencia y protección, tendrán derecho al acceso a la información, la cual deberá ser clara, completa, veraz y oportuna, teniendo en cuenta las características individuales de cada persona en relación con sus derechos, mecanismos y procedimientos contemplados en el presente decreto y que para su garantía debe considerar, entre otras, las siguientes situaciones:

a. Si la víctima se encuentra en el territorio de un país cuyo idioma no comprende, el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores coordinará con las entidades correspondientes para facilitar los mecanismos necesarios que garanticen la comprensión de la información;
b. Si la víctima es persona con discapacidad sensorial (auditiva, visual y/o sordo o con ceguera), el Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social y/o las Secretarías Departamentales y Distritales de Salud coordinarán con las entidades correspondientes para facilitar los mecanismos necesarios que garanticen la comprensión de la información.

Parágrafo 1. Cuando la víctima, por su condición de discapacidad mental o cognitiva o afectación de su salud mental, como consecuencia del delito de la trata de personas no tenga disposición plena de su voluntad para tomar decisiones autónomas, las mismas serán adoptadas por sus familiares, representante legal, judicial o quien haga sus veces, salvo cuando cualquiera de ellos sea el presunto victimario; cuando la víctima o cualquiera de las personas antes mencionadas no puedan decidir por ellas, lo hará la autoridad competente.
Parágrafo 2. Cuando se trate de un niño, niña o adolescente lo hará la autoridad competente (Defensor de Familia, Comisario de Familia o Inspector de Policía), sin perjuicio de que cuente con representante legal.

9. Corresponsabilidad. Todas las entidades estatales tanto del nivel nacional como territorial tienen la responsabilidad de asistir integralmente a las víctimas de la trata de personas conforme a sus competencias y responsabilidades.

Artículo 5°. Iniciación programa de protección y asistencia inmediata. Este programa inicia con la recepción de la información del caso, la cual puede provenir de cualquier fuente; información que debe constituir indicio del cual se infiera la existencia de fines de explotación a una persona, y deberá contener los datos necesarios para identificar a la víctima del delito de la trata de personas, para cuyo efecto se diligenciara el formato de reporte de casos que diseñe el Ministerio del Interior.
La autoridad que reciba la información o la víctima diligenciara el formato a que se refiere el inciso anterior y así mismo, le dará a conocer sus derechos y deberes, sin perjuicio de trasladar la información al Ministerio del Interior y a la autoridad que deba intervenir.

Artículo 6°. Alcances del programa de protección y asistencia inmediata. Este programa debe garantizar la prestación como mínimo de los siguientes servicios: retorno de las víctimas a su lugar de origen si estas lo solicitan, seguridad, alojamiento digno, asistencia médica, psicológica, y material e información y asesoría jurídica respecto de los derechos y procedimientos legales a seguir en los términos del artículo 7° de la Ley 985 de 2005.

Parágrafo. La asistencia inmediata se prestará sin requisito previo de denuncia de la víctima.
En el evento que se llegare a comprobar que la víctima brindó información falsa para ingresar a cualquiera de los programas aquí previstos, será investigada conforme a las leyes.
Así mismo, la autoridad que conozca del hecho informará a la Fiscalía y demás autoridades competentes para que se inicie la investigación correspondiente.

Artículo 14. Asistencia médica y psicológica inmediata. Cuando una víctima ingrese al programa de asistencia y protección de que trata el presente decreto y no se encuentre afiliada al Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud, contará con una valoración de su estado de salud física y mental, la cual será brindada por la Institución Prestadora de Servicios de Salud que defina la entidad territorial competente en coordinación con el Comité Departamental, Distrital o Municipal de Lucha contra la Trata de Personas. Posterior a la atención inicial, y una vez la víctima haya establecido su domicilio, se adelantará el procedimiento establecido en el artículo 32 de la Ley 1438 de 2011.
Si la víctima está afiliada al Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud, la atención se brindará por parte de la Institución Prestadora de Servicios de Salud que determine la entidad promotora de salud en coordinación con el Comité Departamental, Distrital o Municipal de Lucha contra la Trata de Personas.
Las Instituciones Prestadoras de Servicios de Salud no podrán imponer barreras administrativas derivadas de la afiliación al Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud.
El costo de la atención inmediata deberá ser asumido por la Entidad Promotora de Salud a la que esté afiliada la víctima y, en caso de no estarlo, por la entidad territorial hasta tanto se surta la afiliación al Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud, la cual deberá realizarse en los términos establecidos por la normatividad vigente.

Artículo 15. Responsabilidad de la atención médica y psicológica en las medidas de asistencia inmediata. La prestación de servicios de atención en salud física y mental a las víctimas de la trata de personas estará a cargo de la Empresa Promotora de Salud del Régimen Subsidiado, o quien haga sus veces, del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud a la cual sea afiliada la víctima, de acuerdo a las competencias institucionales establecidas en la normatividad vigente.
En caso de que la víctima de la trata de personas decida trasladarse a otro lugar, la secretaría de salud municipal o distrital del lugar de recepción deberá coordinar con el distrito o municipio del otro lugar a fin de garantizar la continuidad y oportunidad en la prestación de los servicios de salud física y mental.

Artículo 16. Asesoría jurídica. La Defensoría del Pueblo, de acuerdo a sus funciones, brindará a las víctimas, de manera gratuita, inmediata y especializada, información, asesoría y orientación jurídica respecto de sus derechos y procedimientos legales a seguir.

Artículo 37. Duración de cada una de las etapas de asistencia. La duración de cada una de las etapas será la siguiente:
Asistencia inmediata: Esta etapa tendrá una duración de hasta cinco (5) días calendario, contados a partir del momento en que la víctima de la trata de personas es acogida por el programa de asistencia inmediata. Este término podrá ser prorrogado hasta por 5 días calendario más, en casos excepcionales, según lo determine la autoridad a cargo de la asistencia, de lo cual deberá informar a la secretaría técnica del respectivo comité.
Asistencia mediata: Esta etapa tendrá una duración de hasta seis (6) meses, contados a partir de la terminación de la etapa de asistencia inmediata; término que podrá ser prorrogado para casos excepcionales hasta por un término de tres (3) meses, según lo determine el Comité Interinstitucional, departamental, distrital o municipal.

Parágrafo. En materia de atención en salud física y mental, la víctima, de acuerdo al principio de continuidad, consagrado en la Ley 1438 de 2011, una vez haya ingresado al Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud tiene vocación de permanencia y no debe, en principio, ser separado del Sistema mismo cuando esté en peligro su calidad de vida e integridad; de igual manera el derecho a la seguridad social en salud es irrenunciable. En caso de que la víctima de la trata de personas adquiera capacidad económica o sea vinculada laboralmente, deberá hacer transición del Régimen Subsidiado al Régimen Contributivo, de acuerdo a lo establecido en el artículo 14 del presente decreto y en cumplimiento de lo establecido en el artículo 32 de la Ley 1438 de 2011.

Penalties

Ley 599, 2000 amend. ey 1719, 2014
Artículo 141. Prostitución forzada en persona protegida. El que, con ocasión y en desarrollo del conflicto armado, obligue a persona protegida a prestar servicios sexuales, incurrirá en prisión de ciento sesenta (160) a trescientos veinticuatro (324) meses y multa de seiscientos sesenta y seis punto sesenta y seis (666.66) a mil quinientos (1.500) salarios mínimos legales mensuales vigentes.

Artículo 141A. Esclavitud sexual en persona protegida. El que, con ocasión y en desarrollo del conflicto armado, ejerza uno de los atributos del derecho de propiedad por medio de la violencia sobre persona protegida para que realice uno o más actos de naturaleza sexual, incurrirá en prisión de ciento sesenta (160) a trescientos veinticuatro (324) meses y multa de seiscientos sesenta y seis punto sesenta y seis (666.66) a mil quinientos (1.500) salarios mínimos legales mensuales vigentes.

Artículo 141B. Trata de personas en persona protegida con fines de explotación sexual. El que, con ocasión y en desarrollo del conflicto armado, capte, traslade, acoja o reciba a una persona protegida dentro del territorio nacional o hacia el exterior, con fines de explotación sexual, incurrirá en prisión de ciento cincuenta y seis (156) a doscientos setenta y seis (276) meses y una multa de ochocientos (800) a mil quinientos (1.500) salarios mínimos legales mensuales vigentes.
Para efectos de este artículo se entenderá por explotación de carácter sexual el obtener provecho económico o cualquier otro beneficio para sí o para otra persona, mediante la explotación de la prostitución ajena, la esclavitud sexual, el matrimonio servil, el turismo sexual o cualquier otra forma de explotación sexual.

Ley 599, 2000 amend. Ley 985, 2005
Art. 188A. Trata de personas. El que capte, traslade, acoja o reciba a una persona, dentro del territorio nacional o hacia el exterior, con fines de explotación, incurrirá en prisión de trece (13) a veintitrés (23) años y una multa de ochocientos (800) a mil quinientos (1.500) salarios mínimos legales mensuales vigentes

Ley 599, 2000 amend. Ley 1453, 2011
Art. 188.C. Tráfico de niñas, niños y adolescentes. El que intervenga en cualquier acto o transacción en virtud de la cual un niño, niña o adolescente sea vendido, entregado o traficado por precio en efectivo o cualquier otra retribución a una persona o grupo de personas, incurrirá en prisión de treinta (30) a sesenta (60) años y una multa de mil (1.000) a dos mil (2.000) salarios mínimos legales mensuales vigentes. El consentimiento dado por la víctima o sus padres, o representantes o cuidadores no constituirá causal de exoneración ni será una circunstancia de atenuación punitiva de la responsabilidad penal. La pena descrita en el primer inciso se aumentará de una tercera parte a la mitad, cuando:

1. Cuando la víctima resulte afectada física o psíquicamente, o con inmadurez mental, o trastorno mental, en forma temporal o permanente.
2. El responsable sea pariente hasta el tercer grado de consanguinidad, segundo de afinidad y primero civil del niño, niña o adolescente.
3. El autor o partícipe sea un funcionario que preste servicios de salud o profesionales de la salud, servicio doméstico y guarderías.
4. El autor o partíCipe sea una persona que tenga como función la protección y atención ~ integral del niño, la niña o adolescente.

Art. 188.D. Uso de menores de edad para la comisión de delitos. El que induzca, facilite, utilice, constriña, promueva o instrumentalice a un menor de 18 años a cometer delitos o promueva dicha utilización, constreñimiento, inducción, o participe de cualquier modo en las conductas descritas, incurrirá por este solo hecho, en prisión de diez (10) a diez y veinte (20) años. El consentimiento dado por el menor de 18 años no constituirá causal de exoneración, de la responsabilidad penal.
La pena se aumentará de una tercera parte a la mitad si se trata de menor de 14 años de edad.
La pena se aumentará de una tercera parte a la mitad en los mismos eventos de agravación del artículo 188.C.

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protections: General (at Least One)
Social Protections (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protections: Unemployed
Social Protections: Pension
Social Protections: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protections: Poor
Social Protections: Children
Social Protections: Disabled
Official Response

Official Response from the Departamento Administrativo Nacional De Estadistica (DANE)

Based on the Official Response from the Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadistica (DANE), the Dashboard for Colombia has been revised as follows:

  • Inclusion in Overview tab of additional information about how to compare data from different surveys; and
  • New links added to additional data provided by DANE.