Data Dashboards

Costa Rica Dashboard
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2001 and 2012 decreased by 62%.

-62%

2001- 2012

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.776 (2015)

Mean School Years: 8.7 years (2015)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 20.7% (2013)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.6% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2003
Social Protections Coverage

General (at least one): 72% (2016)

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 68.8% (2016)

Vulnerable: 66.5% (2016)

Children: 17.7% (2016)

Disabled: No data

Poor: 38% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS) resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Costa Rica, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2001 to 2012. The measures provided for 2013 and 2014 do not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2014.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Costa Rica, the estimates show that 1 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The number is lower than in 2011, and has decreased from 4.3 percent in 2001. The measures provided for 2013 and 2014 do not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2014.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Costa Rica, the estimates show that 6.9 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The percentage is higher than in 2011, but has decreased from 16.1 percent in 2001.The measures provided for 2013 and 2014 do not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001-2014.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2014 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Costa Rica was 12.5 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 18.5 hours in 2013.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2014.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2014, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 26.5 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2013, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 40.1.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2014.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 7.9 hours per week according to the 2014 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2013, which found that children aged 5-14 in Costa Rica worked an average of 8.5 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region.Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2002, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Costa Rica is from 2012. By the 2012 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector and the Other Services sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Costa Rica.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Costa Rica.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Costa Rica between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Costa Rica is 0.776. This score indicates that human development is high.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Costa Rica over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction toward achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1990 and 2013, Costa Rica showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children.”

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Costa Rica.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica, 1949, amend. ley No 7880, 1999
Artículo 56. El trabajo es un derecho del individuo y una obligación con la sociedad. El Estado debe procurar que todos tengan ocupación honesta y útil, debidamente remunerada, e impedir que por causa de ella se establezcan condiciones que en alguna forma menoscaben la libertad o la dignidad del hombre o degraden su trabajo a la condición de simple mercancía. El Estado garantiza el derecho de libre elección de trabajo.

Código de Trabajo, 1943
Artículo 8. A ningún individuo se le coartará la libertad de trabajo, ni se le podrá impedir que se dedique a la profesión, industria o comercio que le plazca, siempre que cumpla las prescripciones de las leyes y reglamentos respectivos. Solamente cuando se ataquen los derechos de terceros o se ofendan los de la sociedad, podrá impedirse el trabajo y ello mediante resolución de las autoridades competentes, dictada conforme a la ley.
No se entenderá coartada la libertad de trabajo cuando se actúe en uso de las facultades que prescriban este Código, sus reglamentos y sus leyes conexas.

Ley contra la Trata de Personas y Creación de la coalición nacional contra el tráfico ilícito de Migrantes y la trata de Personas (CONATT), 2014

Artículo 7—Definiciones. Para los efectos de la presente ley se definen los términos siguientes:
y. Trabajo o servicio forzado: es el exigido a una persona bajo la amenaza de un daño o el deber de pago de una deuda espuria o por engaño.

Child Labour

Ley núm. 7739 por la cual se aprueba el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia
Artículo 78. Derecho al trabajo. El Estado reconocerá el derecho de las personas adolescentes mayores de quince años a trabajar con las restricciones que imponen este Código, los convenios internacionales y la ley. Este derecho podrá limitarse solamente cuando la actividad laboral importe riesgo, peligro para el desarrollo, la salud física, mental y emocional o cuando perturbe la asistencia regular al centro educativo.

Artículo 87. Trabajo y educación. El derecho y la obligación de educarse de las personas menores de edad deberán armonizarse con el trabajo de las personas adolescentes. Para ello, su trabajo deberá ejecutarse sin detrimento de la asistencia al centro educativo. El Ministerio de Educación Pública diseñará las modalidades y los horarios escolares que permitan la asistencia de esta población a los centros educativos.
Las autoridades de los centros educativos velarán porque el trabajo no afecte la asistencia y el rendimiento escolar. Deberán informar, a la Dirección Nacional e Inspección General de Trabajo del Ministerio de Trabajo y Seguridad Social, cualquier situación irregular en las condiciones laborales de los educandos.

Artículo 88. Facilidades para estudiar. Los empleadores que contraten adolescentes estarán obligados a concederles las facilidades que compatibilicen su trabajo con la asistencia regular al centro educativo.

Artículo 92. Prohibición laboral. Prohíbese el trabajo de las personas menores de quince años. Quien por cualquier medio constate que una de ellas labora, violando esta prohibición, pondrá este hecho en conocimiento del Patronato Nacional de la Infancia, a fin de que adopte las medidas adecuadas para que esta persona cese sus actividades laborales y se reincorpore al sistema educativo.
Cuando el Patronato determine que las actividades laborales de las personas menores de edad se originan en necesidades familiares de orden socioeconómico, gestionará ante las entidades competentes nombradas en el Artículo 31 de este Código, las medidas pertinentes para proveer de la asistencia necesaria al núcleo familiar.

Ley núm. 8922 de prohibición del trabajo peligroso e insalubre para personas adolescentes trabajadoras, 2011
Artículo 1. Para efectos de la presente Ley, se entiende por trabajo adolescente la prestación personal de servicios que realizan personas adolescentes mayores de quince años y menores de dieciocho años de edad, quienes se encuentran bajo un régimen especial de protección que les garantiza plena igualdad de oportunidades, de remuneración y de trato en materia de empleo y ocupación.

Artículo 2. El trabajo de las personas adolescentes es permitido únicamente en el marco del capítulo VII del Régimen especial de protección al trabajador adolescente del Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, Ley N.o 7739, de 6 de enero de 1998, y la sección II del capítulo II del Reglamento para la contratación laboral y condiciones de salud ocupacional de las personas adolescentes. Asimismo, son de aplicación obligatoria los principios contenidos en el Código citado en este Artículo.

Código de Trabajo, 1943
Artículo 87. Queda absolutamente prohibido contratar el trabajo de las mujeres y de los menores de dieciocho años para desempeñar labores insalubres, pesadas o peligrosas, en los aspectos físico o moral, según la determinación que de éstas hará en el reglamento. Al efecto, el Ministerio de Trabajo y Seguridad Social tomará en cuenta las disposiciones del Artículo 199. También deberá consultar, con las organizaciones de trabajadores y de empleados interesados y con las asociaciones representativas de mujeres, la forma y condiciones del desempeño del trabajo de las mujeres, en aquellas actividades que pudieran serles perjudiciales debido a su particular peligrosidad, insalubridad o dureza.
Sin perjuicio de otras sanciones e indemnizaciones legales, cuando les ocurriere un accidente o enfermedad a las personas de que habla el párrafo anterior, y se comprobare que tiene su causa en la ejecución de las mencionadas labores prohibidas, el patrono culpable deberá satisfacerle al accidentado o enfermo una cantidad equivalente al importe de tres meses de salario.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Ley núm. 7739 por la cual se aprueba el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia
Artículo 94. Labores prohibidas para adolescentes. Prohíbese el trabajo de las personas adolescentes en minas y canteras, lugares insalubres y peligrosos, expendios de bebidas alcohólicas, actividades en las que su propia seguridad o la de otras personas estén sujetas a la responsabilidad del menor de edad; asimismo, donde se requiera trabajar con maquinaria peligrosa, sustancias contaminantes y ruidos excesivos.

Artículo 95. Jornada de trabajo. El trabajo de las personas adolescentes no podrá exceder de seis horas diarias ni de treinta y seis horas semanales.
Prohíbese el trabajo nocturno de las personas adolescentes. Se entenderá por este tipo de trabajo el desempeñado entre las 19:00 horas y las 7:00 horas del día siguiente, excepto la jornada mixta, que no podrá sobrepasar las 22:00 horas.

Ley núm. 8922 de prohibición del trabajo peligroso e insalubre para personas adolescentes trabajadoras, 2011
Artículo 3. Por su naturaleza, son trabajos peligrosos e insalubres las actividades, ocupaciones o tareas que tienen intrínseca la posibilidad de causar daño a la salud física, mental, el desarrollo integral e incluso la muerte de la persona adolescente trabajadora, como consecuencia de la exposición a factores tecnológicos, de seguridad y físico- ambientales adversos, uso de productos, objetos y sustancias peligrosas, sobrecarga física y entornos con peligro de violencia y explotación, sin perjuicio de lo que indique el Artículo 4 de la Ley N.o 8122, Aprobación del Convenio internacional número 182 sobre la prohibición de las peores formas de trabajo infantil y la acción inmediata para su eliminación, de 17 de agosto de 2001.

Artículo 5. Según lo establecido por el Artículo anterior, se prohíbe la participación de las personas adolescentes trabajadoras en las siguientes actividades, ocupaciones o tareas:

a. Trabajos o actividades de explotación de minas, canteras, trabajos subterráneos y en excavaciones.
b. Trabajos o actividades que se desarrollen en espacios confinados, cerrados, o sea, circunscritos a una sola área, con condiciones estructurales riesgosas o procesos peligrosos que conlleven a la concentración de sustancias químicas, combustibles, biológicas o a la exposición a condiciones ambientales dañinas por falta o exceso de oxígeno.
c. Trabajos o actividades en alta mar, marinero en cualquier escala y extractor de moluscos.
d. Trabajos o actividades bajo el agua, buceo y toda actividad que implique sumersión.
e. Trabajos o actividades con agroquímicos en sintetizadoras, formuladoras, reempacadoras, reenvasado, manipulación, transporte, compra-venta, aplicación y disposición de desechos.
f. Trabajos o actividades que impliquen el contacto con productos, sustancias u objetos de carácter tóxico, combustible, comburente, inflamable, radioactivo, infeccioso, irritante y corrosivo, y todos aquellos que en la hoja de seguridad de cada producto indiquen efectos perjudiciales a la salud como son: carcinogenicidad, mutagenicidad, teratogenicidad, neurotoxicidad, alteraciones del sistema reproductor, órganos blancos y otros productos declarados como tales por el Ministerio de Salud.
g. Trabajos o actividades de fabricación, colocación y manejo de sustancias u objetos explosivos en sí mismos y en la fabricación de objetos de efecto explosivo o pirotécnico.
h. Trabajos o actividades que impliquen el uso de equipos pesados, generadores de vibraciones, maquinaria aplastante, triturante, atrapante y cortante, grúas, montacargas, tractores de oruga y los demás tipos de maquinaria y vehículos no autorizados para menores de dieciocho años, según lo dispuesto en la Ley de tránsito por vías públicas terrestres vigente.
i. Trabajos o actividades de construcción de vías públicas o privadas, mantenimiento de carreteras, represas, puentes y muelles y obras similares,
específicamente que impliquen movimiento de tierra, manipulación del asfalto, carpeteo de carreteras, perfilado y reciclado de carpeta asfáltica y demarcación.
j. Trabajos o actividades que requieran el uso de máquinas y herramientas manuales y mecánicas de alta complejidad y de naturaleza cortante, aplastante y triturante.
k. Trabajos o actividades que impliquen el transporte manual y continuo de cargas pesadas, incluyendo su levantamiento y colocación, siempre y cuando sea soportado totalmente por la persona adolescente.
l. Trabajos o actividades en ambientes con exposición a ruidos y vibraciones superiores a los estándares establecidos internacionalmente.
m. Trabajos o actividades en alturas que implique el uso de andamios, arnés, escaleras y líneas de vida.
n. Trabajos o actividades con exposición a temperaturas extremas, sean estas bajas o altas.
ñ. Trabajos o actividades con electricidad que impliquen el montaje, la regulación y la reparación de instalaciones eléctricas en la construcción de obras públicas o privadas.
o. Trabajos o actividades en producción, repartición o venta exclusiva de bebidas alcohólicas y en establecimientos de consumo inmediato.
p. Trabajos o actividades en ambientes que favorezcan la adquisición de conductas de tipo disociativo, que atenten contra la propia integridad emocional de la persona adolescente y de otras personas, en centros nocturnos, prostíbulos, salas de juegos de azar, salas o sitios de espectáculos para adultos o talleres y establecimientos donde se grabe, imprima, fotografíe o filme material de tipo erótico y pornográfico o establecimientos que realicen actividades similares.
q. Trabajos o actividades en los que la propia seguridad y la de otras personas dependan de la persona adolescente trabajadora, como son labores de vigilancia pública y privada, cuidado de personas menores de edad, personas adultas mayores, personas enfermas, traslados de dinero y de otros bienes o valores.
r. Trabajos o actividades mencionados en el Artículo 3 de la Ley N.o 8122, Aprobación del Convenio internacional número 182 sobre la prohibición de las peores formas de trabajo infantil y la acción inmediata para su eliminación, de 17 de agosto de 2001.

Artículo 6. Son trabajos peligrosos e insalubres, por sus condiciones, las actividades, ocupaciones o tareas que se derivan de la forma en que se organiza y desarrolla el trabajo, y cuyo contenido, exigencia laboral y tiempo dedicado a este podría causar daño de modo grave a la salud física o mental, al desarrollo integral e incluso la muerte de la persona adolescente trabajadora, sin que necesariamente la naturaleza de la actividad sea insalubre y peligrosa.

Decreto Ejecutivo núm. 36640-MTSS que dicta el Reglamento a la Ley sobre Prohibición del Trabajo Peligroso e Insalubre para personas adolescentes trabajadoras y reforma el Reglamento para la Contratación laboral y condiciones de salud ocupacional de las personas adolescentes, 2011
Artículo 1. Este Reglamento establece las regulaciones y las medidas administrativas requeridas para cumplir con la Ley No 8922 referente a la Prohibición del Trabajo Peligroso e Insalubre para las Personas Adolescentes Trabajadoras, sin perjuicio de otras disposiciones legales y reglamentarias, en especial lo establecido en el Decreto No 29220-MTSS del 30 de octubre del 2000 denominado “Reglamento para la Contratación Laboral y condiciones de Salud Ocupacional de las Personas Adolescentes”.

SECCIÓN I Labores prohibidas por su naturaleza
Artículo 5. Es absolutamente prohibida la participación de las personas adolescentes trabajadoras en las siguientes actividades, ocupaciones o tareas:

SECCIÓN II Labores prohibidas por sus condiciones
Artículo 6. Se considerarán labores prohibidas para las personas trabajadores adolescentes por sus condiciones las siguientes:

Código de Trabajo, 1943
Artículo 88. También queda absolutamente prohibido:

a. El trabajo nocturno de los menores de dieciocho años y el diurno de éstos en hosterías, clubes, cantinas y en todos los expendios de bebidas embriagantes de consumo inmediato; y
b. El trabajo nocturno de las mujeres, con excepción de las trabajadoras a domicilio o en familia, enfermeras, visitadoras sociales, servidoras domésticas y otras análogas quienes podrán trabajar todo el tiempo que sea compatible con su salud física, mental y moral; y de aquellas que se dediquen a labores puramente burocráticas o al expendio de establecimientos comerciales, siempre que su trabajo no exceda de las doce de la noche, y que sus condiciones de trabajo, duración de jornada, horas extraordinarias, etc., estén debidamente estipulados en contratos individuales de trabajo, previamente aprobados por la Inspección General del ramo.

A dichos trabajos prohibidos se aplicará lo dispuesto en el párrafo segundo del Artículo 87.
En empresas que presten servicios de interés público y cuyas labores no sean pesadas, insalubres o peligrosas, podrá realizarse el trabajo nocturno de las mujeres durante el tiempo que sea compatible con su salud física, mental y moral, siempre que el Ministerio de Trabajo y Seguridad Social, con estudio de cada caso, extienda autorización expresa al patrono respectivo.
A los efectos del presente Artículo se considerará período nocturno, para los menores, el comprendido entre las 18 y las 6 horas, y, para las mujeres, el comprendido entre las 19 horas y las 6 horas.

Artículo 89. Igualmente queda prohibido:

a. El trabajo durante más de siete horas diarias y cuarenta y dos semanales para los mayores de quince años y menores de dieciocho;
b. El trabajo durante más de cinco horas diarias y treinta semanales para los menores de quince años y mayores de doce;
c. El trabajo de los menores de doce años, y
d. En general, la ocupación de menores comprendidos en la edad escolar que no hayan completado, o cuyo trabajo no les permita completar, la instrucción obligatoria.

No obstante, en tratándose de explotaciones agrícolas o ganaderas, se permitirá el trabajo diurno de los mayores de doce y menores de dieciocho años, dentro de las limitaciones que establece el Capítulo Segundo del Título Tercero y siempre que en cada caso se cumplan las disposiciones del Artículo 91, incisos b) y c)

Trata de personas

Código Penal, 1970
Artículo 172. Delito de trata de personas
Será sancionado con pena de prisión de seis a diez años, quien promueva, facilite o favorezca la entrada o salida del país, o el desplazamiento dentro del territorio nacional, de personas de cualquier sexo para realizar uno o varios actos de prostitución o someterlas a explotación, servidumbre sexual o laboral, esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, trabajos o servicios forzados, matrimonio servil, mendicidad, extracción ilícita de órganos o adopción irregular.
La pena de prisión será de ocho a dieciséis años, si media, además, alguna de las siguientes circunstancias:

a. La víctima sea menor de dieciocho años de edad o se encuentre en una situación de vulnerabilidad o discapacidad.
b. Engaño, violencia o cualquier medio de intimidación o coacción.
c. El autor sea cónyuge, conviviente o pariente de la víctima hasta tercer grado de consanguinidad o afinidad.
d. El autor se prevalezca de su relación de autoridad o confianza con la víctima o su familia, medie o no relación de parentesco.
e. El autor se aproveche del ejercicio de su profesión o de la función que desempeña.
f. La víctima sufra grave daño en su salud.
g. El hecho punible fuere cometido por un grupo delictivo
integrado por dos o más miembros.

Slavery

Constitución Política de la República de Costa Rica, 1949, amend. ley No 7880, 1999
Capítulo Único
Artículo 20. Toda persona es libre en la República, quien se halle bajo la protección de sus leyes no podrá ser esclavo ni esclava.

Ley contra la Trata de Personas y Creación de la coalición nacional contra el tráfico ilícito de Migrantes y la trata de Personas (CONATT), 2014

Artículo 7—Definiciones. Para los efectos de la presente ley se definen los términos siguientes:
j.  Esclavitud: situación y condición social en la que se encuentra una persona que carece de libertad y derechos por estar sometida de manera absoluta a la voluntad y el dominio de otra.
r. Prácticas análogas a la esclavitud: incluye la servidumbre por deudas, la servidumbre laboral (de la gleba), los matrimonios forzados o serviles y la entrega de personas menores de edad, para su explotación sexual o laboral.

International Commitments
National Strategies

2010–2020 Roadmap Towards the Elimination of Child Labor in Costa Rica

“Aims to eradicate all forms of child labor in Costa Rica by 2020 by strengthening anti-poverty, health, and educational programs and policies, and by raising awareness on child labor.”

Inter-Institutional Coordinating Protocol for the Protection of Working Minors

“Outlines service provision for child laborers through collaboration between the MTSS, PANI, the Ministry of Education, and IMAS, as well as their regional and local agencies and the private sector.”

National Plan for Development (2015–2018)

“Incorporates efforts to decrease child labor into national education and poverty reduction strategies.”

Bridge to Development (2015–2018)

“Aims to reduce poverty and eliminate vulnerability, including child labor, by providing social services to families in poor communities.”

International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1960

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1959

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 1976

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2001

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratification 2003

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratification 2003

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2002

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of modern slavery, forced labour, child labour and human trafficking. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ley contra la Trata de Personas y Creación de la coalición nacional contra el tráfico ilícito de Migrantes y la trata de Personas (CONATT), 2014

Artículo 36. Denuncias penales. El Estado costarricense procurará en todo momento que las víctimas interpongan las denuncias penales respectivas ante sospecha del delito de la trata; sin embargo, la debida atención y protección integral a las víctimas de la trata de personas, nacionales o extranjeras, no dependerá de la interposición de dicha denuncia.

Artículo 37. Derechos. Además de lo establecido en la Ley No 8720, Ley de Protección a Víctimas, Testigos y demás Sujetos Intervinientes en el Proceso Penal, las víctimas de la trata de personas tienen derecho a:

a.  Protección de su integridad física y emocional.
b.  Recibir alojamiento apropiado, accesible y seguro, así como cobertura de sus necesidades básicas de alimentación, vestido e higiene.
c.  Como parte del proceso de recuperación, tener acceso a servicios gratuitos de atención integral en salud, incluyendo terapias y tratamientos especializados, en caso necesario.
d.  Recibir información clara y comprensible sobre sus derechos, su situación legal y migratoria, en un idioma, medio o lenguaje que comprendan y de acuerdo con su edad, grado de madurez o condición de discapacidad, así como acceso a servicios de asistencia y representación legal gratuita.
e.  Contar con asistencia legal y psicológica.
f.  Contar con el tiempo necesario para reflexionar, con la asistencia legal y psicológica correspondiente, sobre su posible intervención en el proceso penal en el que figura cómo víctima, si aún no ha tomado esa decisión. Este período no será menor a tres meses.
g.  Prestar entrevista o declaración en condiciones especiales de protección y cuidado según su edad, grado de madurez o condición de discapacidad e idioma.
h.  La protección de su identidad y privacidad.
i. Protección migratoria incluyendo el derecho de permanecer en el país, de conformidad con la legislación migratoria vigente, y a recibir la documentación que acredite tal circunstancia, de conformidad con la Ley No 8764, Ley General de Migración y Extranjería.
j. La exoneración de cualquier tasa, impuesto o carga impositiva, referida a la emisión de documentos por parte de la Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería, que acredite su condición migratoria como víctima de trata de personas.
k.  Que la repatriación o el retorno a su lugar de residencia sea voluntaria, segura y sin demora. Cuando se trate de personas menores de edad, además de lo anterior, su repatriación o retorno debe ser acompañada de conformidad con los protocolos establecidos.
l.  Que se les facilite información y acceso a entidades idóneas para lograr el reasentamiento, cuando se requiera su traslado a un tercer país. En el caso de niños, niñas y adolescentes víctimas de delito, además de los derechos precedentemente enunciados, se garantizará que los procedimientos reconozcan sus condiciones de sujetos plenos de derechos acorde a su autonomía progresiva. Se procurará la reintegración a su núcleo familiar o comunidad, si así lo determina el interés superior.

Cuando se trata de personas víctimas con discapacidad se atenderán sus necesidades derivadas de la condición de discapacidad que presentan. Los derechos citados en este artículo son integrales, irrenunciables e indivisibles.

Artículo 38. Medidas de atención primaria a las víctimas.
Artículo 41. Derecho a la privacidad y reserva de identidad.
Artículo 42. Medidas de atención especial para personas menores de edad.
Artículo 46. Protección de víctimas y testigos del delito de trata de personas y actividades conexas.
Artículo 48. Repatriación y retorno.
Artículo 51. Asistencia a víctimas costarricenses en el extranjero.

Artículo 70.—No punibilidad. Las víctimas del delito de trata de personas no son punibles penal o administrativamente por la comisión de faltas o delitos, cuando estos se hayan cometido durante la ejecución del delito de trata de personas y a consecuencia de esta, sin perjuicio de las acciones legales que el agraviado pueda ejercer contra el autor o los autores de los hechos.

Artículo 73.—Acción civil resarcitoria. Cuando el tribunal declare al imputado penalmente responsable del delito de trata de personas o sus actividades conexas, y se haya ejercido la acción civil resarcitoria por parte de la víctima y si así procediera, también lo condenará al pago de la reparación del daño provocado a la persona víctima. La condenatoria civil debe incluir:

a.  Los costos del tratamiento médico.
b.  Los costos de la atención psicológica y la rehabilitación física y ocupacional.
c.  Los costos del transporte, incluido el de retorno voluntario a su lugar de origen o traslado a otro país cuando corresponda, los gastos de alimentación, de vivienda provisional y el cuidado de personas menores de edad o de personas con discapacidad, en que haya incurrido.
d.  El resarcimiento de los perjuicios ocasionados.
e. La indemnización por daños psicológicos.

El estatus migratorio de la persona víctima o su ausencia por retorno a su país de origen, residencia o tercer país, no impedirá que el tribunal ordene el pago de una indemnización con arreglo al presente artículo.

Las autoridades judiciales correspondientes, con el apoyo de las representaciones consulares y diplomáticas, realizarán todas las gestiones necesarias para localizar a la víctima y ponerla en conocimiento de la resolución judicial que le otorga el beneficio resarcitorio.

El daño sufrido por la víctima será valorado por un perito nombrado por el tribunal y debidamente capacitado para ese efecto.

Decreto núm. 35144-MG-MTSS de creación del equipo de respuesta inmediata para situaciones de trata de personas, 2009

“Crea el Equipo de Respuesta Inmediata para situaciones de Trata de Personas como cuerpo especializado interinstitucional para la atención de las personas afectadas por este delito. Regula su integración, funciones, ámbito de acción y coordinación.”

Ley núm. 8764 General de Migración y Extranjería, 2009
Artículo 6. La formulación de la política migratoria estará orientada principalmente a lo siguiente:

1. Promover, regular, orientar y ordenar las dinámicas de inmigración y emigración, en forma tal que contribuyan al desarrollo nacional por medio del enriquecimiento económico social y cultural de la sociedad costarricense. Con ese propósito, se promoverá la regularización e integración de las comunidades inmigrantes en la sociedad costarricense, así como el establecimiento de mecanismos que permitan mantener y estimular el vínculo permanente entre la sociedad nacional y sus comunidades de emigrantes.
2. Facilitar el retorno de las personas nacionales ubicadas en el exterior, que vean afectado su derecho de retorno al país, por causas humanitarias previamente constatadas, o motivo de muerte, siempre y cuando los familiares no puedan sufragar, por necesidad extrema, los costos de traslado del cuerpo.
3. Controlar el ingreso, la permanencia y el egreso de personas extranjeras al país, en concordancia con las políticas de desarrollo nacional y seguridad pública.
4. Orientar la inmigración a las áreas cuyo desarrollo se considere prioritario, hacia actividades y ramas económicas que resulten de interés para el Estado, de conformidad con el Plan nacional de desarrollo.
5. Garantizar la protección, atención y defensa de las personas víctimas de la trata de personas y coordinar con las instituciones competentes tales garantías.
6. Garantizar que el territorio nacional será asilo para toda persona con fundados temores de ser perseguida, enfrente un peligro de ser sometida a tortura o no pueda regresar a otro país, sea o no de origen, donde su vida esté en riesgo, de conformidad con los instrumentos internacionales y regionales debidamente ratificados.
7. Garantizar el cumplimiento de los derechos de las niñas, los niños y los adolescentes migrantes, de conformidad con las convenciones internacionales en esta materia. Se tendrá especialmente en cuenta el interés superior de estas personas.

Artículo 93. La Dirección General podrá autorizar el ingreso al país y la permanencia en él de personas extranjeras, mediante categorías migratorias especiales, con el fin de regular situaciones migratorias que, por su naturaleza, requieran un tratamiento diferente de las categorías migratorias.

Artículo 94. Serán categorías especiales, entre otras, las siguientes:

10. Víctima de trata de personas.

Artículo 95. Las categorías especiales no generarán derechos de permanencia definitiva, salvo las de asilados y apátridas, que se regirán por los instrumentos internacionales suscritos, ratificados y vigentes en Costa Rica.

Artículo 96. Las personas extranjeras admitidas bajo las categorías especiales podrán cambiar de categoría mientras estén en el país, siempre y cuando cumplan los requisitos prefijados por estas. Para ello, deberán cancelar un monto equivalente a doscientos dólares moneda de los Estados Unidos de América (US$200,00).

Artículo 107. La Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería podrá otorgar permanencia temporal a víctimas de trata de personas, previa recomendación técnica que realice la comisión creada por esta Dirección para tal efecto y en cumplimiento de las demás condiciones que establezcan el Reglamento de la presente Ley, los tratados y los convenios internacionales.

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Ley núm. 8922 de prohibición del trabajo peligroso e insalubre para personas adolescentes trabajadoras, 2011
Artículo 9. Las violaciones por acción u omisión, de las disposiciones contenidas en la presente Ley, serán sancionadas conforme lo establece el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia.

Decreto Ejecutivo núm. 36640-MTSS que dicta el Reglamento a la Ley sobre Prohibición del Trabajo Peligroso e Insalubre para personas adolescentes trabajadoras y reforma el Reglamento para la Contratación laboral y condiciones de salud ocupacional de las personas adolescentes, 2011
De las medidas sancionatorias
Artículo 11. Sin perjuicio de las sanciones penales que correspondan, las infracciones administrativas por acción u omisión cometidas por el empleador en violación de los Artículos 88, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95 y 98 del C.N.A. constituirán falta grave y será sancionada por la autoridad competente, conforme a las multas establecidas por el Artículo 101 del C.N.A. reformado mediante la Ley No 8922.

Ley núm. 7739 por la cual se aprueba el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 1998
Artículo 101. Sanciones. Las violaciones, por acción u omisión, de las disposiciones contenidas en los Artículos 88, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95 y 98, en las cuales incurra el empleador constituirán falta grave y será sancionada conforme a los Artículos 611, 613, 614 y 615 del Código de Trabajo, reformado mediante la Ley No. 7360, de 12 de noviembre de 1993.
A las personas físicas o jurídicas condenadas por haber incurrido en las faltas previstas en el párrafo anterior, se les aplicarán las siguientes sanciones:

a. Por la violación del Artículo 88, multa de uno a tres salarios.
b. Por la violación del Artículo 90, multa de cuatro a siete salarios.
c. Por la violación de los Artículos 91 y 93, multa de ocho a once salarios.
d. Por la violación del Artículo 95, multa de doce a quince salarios.
e. Por la violación del Artículo 94, multa de dieciséis a diecinueve salarios.
f. Por la violación de los Artículos 92 y 98, multa de veinte a veintitrés salarios.

Para fijar la cuantía de las sanciones, se tomará como referencia el salario base del oficinista 1, fijado en el presupuesto ordinario de la República vigente en el momento de la infracción.

Código Penal, 1970

Mendicidad
Artículo 383. Se impondrá pena de diez a sesenta días multa, a quien enviare a mendigar a un menor de edad o incapaz confiado a su potestad, cuidado, protección o vigilancia.

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Código Penal, 1970
Delitos internacionales.
Artículo 7. Independientemente de las disposiciones vigentes en el lugar de la comisión del hecho punible y la nacionalidad del autor, se penará, conforme a la ley costarricense, a quienes cometan actos de piratería, terrorismo o su financiamiento, o actos de genocidio; falsifiquen monedas, títulos de crédito, billetes de banco y otros efectos al portador; trafiquen, ilícitamente, armas, municiones, explosivos o materiales relacionados; tomen parte en la trata de esclavos, mujeres o niños; se ocupen del tráfico de estupefacientes o de publicaciones obscenas; asimismo, se penará a quienes cometan otros hechos punibles contra los derechos humanos y el Derecho internacional humanitario, previstos en los tratados suscritos por Costa Rica o en este Código.

Artículo 172. Delito de trata de personas
Será sancionado con pena de prisión de seis a diez años, quien promueva, facilite o favorezca la entrada o salida del país, o el desplazamiento dentro del territorio nacional, de personas de cualquier sexo para realizar uno o varios actos de prostitución o someterlas a explotación, servidumbre sexual o laboral, esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, trabajos o servicios forzados, matrimonio servil, mendicidad, extracción ilícita de órganos o adopción irregular.
La pena de prisión será de ocho a dieciséis años, si media, además, alguna de las siguientes circunstancias:

a. La víctima sea menor de dieciocho años de edad o se encuentre en una situación de vulnerabilidad o discapacidad.
b. Engaño, violencia o cualquier medio de intimidación o coacción.
c. El autor sea cónyuge, conviviente o pariente de la víctima hasta tercer grado de consanguinidad o afinidad.
d. El autor se prevalezca de su relación de autoridad o confianza con la víctima o su familia, medie o no relación de parentesco.
e. El autor se aproveche del ejercicio de su profesión o de la función que desempeña.
f. La víctima sufra grave daño en su salud.
g. El hecho punible fuere cometido por un grupo delictivo
integrado por dos o más miembros.

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk for exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protections: General (at Least One)
Social Protections (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protections: Unemployed
Social Protections: Pension
Social Protections: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protections: Poor
Social Protections: Children
Social Protections: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Costa Rica. If you are a representative of Costa Rica and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us at info@delta87.org.