Data Dashboards

Cuba
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Due to lack of nationally representative data, there is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

No data available

Data Availability
  • Child labour: No ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.778 (2018)

Mean School Years: 11.8 (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 8.0% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.0% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2015
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2013
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: No data

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

No nationally representative data is available on child labour prevalence in Cuba.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on ILO-SIMPOC methods and guidelines for defining, measuring and collecting data on child labour.

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Cuba.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Cuba.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Cuba between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Cuba is 0.778. This score indicates that human development is high.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Cuba over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Cuba showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Cuba.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Constitución de la República de Cuba, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 64. Se reconoce el derecho al trabajo. La persona en condición de trabajar tiene derecho a obtener un empleo digno, en correspondencia con su elección, calificación, aptitud y exigencias de la economía y la sociedad. El Estado organiza instituciones y servicios que faciliten a las familias trabajadoras el desempeño de sus responsabilidades.”

ARTÍCULO 65. Toda persona tiene derecho a que su trabajo se remunere en función de la calidad y cantidad, expresión del principio de distribución socialista “de cada cual según su capacidad, a cada cual según su trabajo”.

Child Labour

Constitución de la República de Cuba, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 86. El Estado, la sociedad y las familias brindan especial protección a las niñas, niños y adolescentes y garantizan su desarrollo armónico e integral para lo cual tienen en cuenta su interés superior en las decisiones y actos que les conciernan.
Las niñas, niños y adolescentes son considerados plenos sujetos de derechos y gozan de aquellos reconocidos en esta Constitución, además de los propios de su especial condición de persona en desarrollo. Son protegidos contra todo tipo de violencia.”

“ARTÍCULO 66. Se prohíbe el trabajo de las niñas, los niños y los adolescentes.
El Estado brinda especial protección a aquellos adolescentes graduados de la enseñanza técnica y profesional u otros que, en circunstancias excepcionales definidas en la ley, son autorizados a incorporarse al trabajo, con el fin de garantizar su adiestramiento y desarrollo integral.”

Ley núm 116 por la que se dicta el Código del Trabajo, 2013

“ARTÍCULO 2.- Los principios fundamentales que rigen el derecho de trabajo son:
d) prohibición del trabajo infantil y la protección especial a los jóvenes en edades comprendidas entre quince y dieciocho años de edad, que se incorporan al trabajo, con el fin de garantizar su desarrollo integral.”

“CAPÍTULO V
PROTECCIÓN ESPECIAL
EN EL TRABAJO A LOS JÓVENES DE QUINCE A DIECIOCHO AÑOS
ARTÍCULO 64.- El Estado protege a los jóvenes comprendidos entre quince y dieciséis años de edad, que excepcionalmente son autorizados a trabajar por haber finalizado sus estudios en la enseñanza profesional o de oficios, u otras razones, que así lo justifiquen.
La autoridad facultada para autorizar la incorporación de estos jóvenes al trabajo y las circunstancias bajo las cuales pueden ser contratados se regulan en el Reglamento de este Código.
Los empleadores en cualquier sector, están obligados a prestar especial atención a estos jóvenes con el propósito de lograr su mejor preparación, adaptación a la vida laboral y el desarrollo de su formación profesional, garantizándoles el disfrute de iguales derechos que los restantes trabajadores.”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Ley núm 116 por la que se dicta el Código del Trabajo, 2013

“ARTÍCULO 65.- La jornada de trabajo de los jóvenes de quince y dieciséis años no puede exceder de siete horas diarias, ni de cuarenta semanales y no se les permite laborar en días de descanso.
ARTÍCULO 68.- Los jóvenes de quince y hasta dieciocho años no pueden ser ocupados en trabajos en que están expuestos a riesgos físicos y psicológicos, labores con nocturnidad, bajo tierra o agua, alturas peligrosas o espacios cerrados, labores con cargas pesadas, expuestos a sustancias peligrosas, altas o bajas temperaturas o niveles de ruido o vibraciones perjudiciales para su salud y desarrollo integral.”

Trata de personas

Código Penal, 1987

“SECCIÓN CUARTA : Proxenetismo Y Trata De Personas
ARTÍCULO 302.1.- (Modificado) Incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de cuatro a diez años, el que:

a) induzca a otro, o de cualquier modo coopere o promueva a que otro ejerza la prostitución o el comercio carnal;
b) directamente o mediante terceros, posea, dirija, administre, haga funcionar o financie de manera total o parcial un local, establecimiento o vivienda, o parte de ellos, en el que se ejerza la prostitución o cualquier otra forma de comercio carnal;
c) obtenga, de cualquier modo, beneficios del ejercicio de la prostitución por parte de otra persona, siempre que el hecho no constituya un delito de mayor gravedad.

2. La sanción es de privación de libertad de diez a veinte años cuando en los hechos a que se refiere el apartado anterior concurra alguna de las circunstancias siguientes:

a) si el inculpado, por las funciones que desempeña, participa en actividades relacionadas, de cualquier modo, con la protección de la salud pública, el mantenimiento del orden público, la educación, el turismo, la dirección de la juventud o la lucha contra la prostitución u otras formas de comercio carnal;
b) si en la ejecución del hecho se emplea amenaza, chantaje, coacción o abuso de autoridad, siempre que la concurrencia de alguna de estas circunstancias no constituya un delito de mayor gravedad;
c) si la víctima del delito es un incapacitado que esté por cualquier motivo al cuidado del culpable.

3. La sanción es de veinte a treinta años de privación de libertad en los casos siguientes:

a) cuando el hecho consista en promover, organizar o incitar la entrada o salida del país de personas con la finalidad de que éstas ejerzan la prostitución o cualquier otra forma de comercio carnal;
b) si el hecho se ejecuta por una persona que con anterioridad ha sido ejecutoriamente sancionada por el delito previsto en este artículo;
c) cuando el autor de los hechos previstos en los apartados anteriores los realiza habitualmente.

4. En los casos de comisión de los delitos previstos en este artículo puede imponerse, además, como sanción accesoria, la de confiscación de bienes.
5. Se considera comercio carnal, a los efectos de este artículo, toda acción de estímulo o explotación de las relaciones sexuales como actividad lucrativa.”

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

 

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, general

Ley de Procedimento Penal, 1977

“ARTICULO 109.-(Modificado) El Fiscal, como responsable de la legalidad socialista, garantiza que:
1. Se esclarezcan los actos punibles, se establezca la verdad objetiva y sean acu-sadas ante los Tribunales las personas que los hayan cometido;
2. se respete la dignidad del ciudadano y que en ningún caso se le someta a restriccio-nes ilegales de sus derechos;
3. se cumplan estrictamente la ley y demás disposiciones legales en las actuaciones de la instrucción que durante la fase pre-paratoria realiza el Instructor.
Durante la tramitación de la fase prepara-toria el Fiscal, además, supervisará el cum-plimiento de la Ley en la ejecución de las acciones, diligencias y trámites así como en la calificación legal de los hechos; seguirá el curso de la instrucción y cuando resulte ne-cesario, dispondrá la práctica de acciones y diligencias indispensables para la comproba-ción del delito, la determinación del autor y demás circunstancias esenciales, o las reali-zará por sí mismo; y velará por el respeto de las garantías procesales del acusado, por la protección de los derechos de la víctima o perjudicado por el delito y por los intereses del Estado y de la sociedad. ”

 

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Decreto 326 de 2014 Reglamento del Código de Trabajo de Cuba

“SECCIÓN SEGUNDA
Infracciones de los derechos de trabajo y de seguridad social
ARTÍCULO 224.- Se consideran infracciones de los derechos fundamentales en el empleo y la contratación de trabajo, las siguientes:

a) Emplear a menores de diecisiete (17) años de edad, sin cumplir los requisitos establecidos en la legislación, a extranjeros no residentes permanentes en Cuba sin poseer el Permiso de Trabajo o la autorización excepcional prevista en la ley a esos efectos o utilizar fuerza de trabajo que requiera aprobación sin poseerla;
b) incumplir las normas para el ingreso al empleo y concertar contratos de trabajo sin sujeción a la legislación;
c) organizar y ejecutar procesos de disponibilidad de trabajadores e interrupción laboral con inobservancia de la ley;
d) impedir sin causa justificada el ingreso al empleo o la contratación de personas que le han sido asignadas por las autoridades u órganos legalmente competentes; y
e) terminar la relación de trabajo aplicando causales, fundamentos y procedimientos sin amparo legal.”

“ARTÍCULO 228.- Se consideran infracciones de los derechos fundamentales en la seguridad y salud en el trabajo las siguientes:
d) incumplir lo establecido en la legislación con respecto a las condiciones de trabajo a garantizar a los jóvenes de quince (15) y hasta dieciocho (18) años de edad;”

Código Penal, 1987

“SECCION TERCERA : Venta Y Tráfico De Menores.

Esta SECCION fue adicionada por el artículo 19 de la Ley No. 87 de 16 de febrero de 1999 (G.O. Ext. No. 1 de 15 de marzo de 1999, pág. 1)
ARTICULO 316.1.- (Modificado) El que venda o transfiera en adopción un menor de dieciséis años de edad, a otra persona, a cambio de recompensa, compensación finan-ciera o de otro tipo, incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de dos a cinco años o multa de trescientas a mil cuotas o ambas.
2. La sanción es de tres a ocho años de privación de libertad cuando en los hechos a que se refiere el apartado anterior concurra alguna de las circunstancias siguientes:

a) si se comenten actos fraudulentos con el propósito de engañar a las autoridades;
b) si es cometido por la persona o responsable de la institución que tiene al menor bajo su guarda y cuidado;
c) si el propósito es trasladar al menor fuera del territorio nacional.

3. La sanción es de siete a quince años de privación de libertad cuando el propósito es utilizar al menor en cualquiera de las formas de tráfico internacional, relacionadas con la práctica de actos de corrupción, pornográficos, el ejercicio de la prostitución, el comer-cio de órganos, los trabajos forzados, activi-dades vinculadas al narcotráfico o al consu-mo ilícito de drogas.
4. Las sanciones previstas en este artículo se imponen siempre que los hechos no constituyan un delito de mayor entidad.”

Penalties, Human trafficking

Código Penal, 1987

“ARTICULO 302.1.- (Modificado) Incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de cuatro a diez años, el que:

a) induzca a otro, o de cualquier modo co-opere o promueva a que otro ejerza la prostitución o el comercio carnal;
b) directamente o mediante terceros, posea, dirija, administre, haga funcionar o financie de manera total o parcial un local, establecimiento o vivienda, o parte de ellos, en el que se ejerza la prostitución o cualquier otra forma de comercio carnal;
c) obtenga, de cualquier modo, beneficios del ejercicio de la prostitución por parte de otra persona, siempre que el hecho no constituya un delito de mayor gravedad.

2. La sanción es de privación de libertad de diez a veinte años cuando en los hechos a que se refiere el apartado anterior concurra alguna de las circunstancias siguientes:

a) si el inculpado, por las funciones que desempeña, participa en actividades relacionadas, de cualquier modo, con la protección de la salud pública, el mantenimiento del orden público, la educación, el turismo, la dirección de la juventud o la lucha contra la prostitución u otras formas de comercio carnal;
b) si en la ejecución del hecho se emplea amenaza, chantaje, coacción o abuso de autoridad, siempre que la concurrencia de alguna de estas circunstancias no constituya un delito de mayor gravedad;
c) si la víctima del delito es un incapacitado que esté por cualquier motivo al cuidado del culpable.

3. La sanción es de veinte a treinta años de privación de libertad en los casos siguientes:

a) cuando el hecho consista en promover, organizar o incitar la entrada o salida del país de personas con la finalidad de que éstas ejerzan la prostitución o cualquier otra forma de comercio carnal;
b) si el hecho se ejecuta por una persona que con anterioridad ha sido ejecutoria-mente sancionada por el delito previsto en este artículo;
c) cuando el autor de los hechos previstos en los apartados anteriores los realiza habitualmente.

4. En los casos de comisión de los delitos previstos en este artículo puede imponerse, además, como sanción accesoria, la de con-fiscación de bienes.
5. Se considera comercio carnal, a los efectos de este artículo, toda acción de estímulo o explotación de las relaciones sexua-les como actividad lucrativa.”

Penalties, General

Código Penal, 1987

“ARTÍCULO 53.- Son circunstancias agravantes las siguientes:

a) cometer el hecho formando parte de un grupo integrado por tres o más personas;
b) cometer el hecho por lucro o por otros móviles viles, o por motivos fútiles;
c) ocasionar con el delito graves consecuencias;
ch) cometer el hecho con la participación de menores;
d) cometer el delito con crueldad o por impulsos de brutal perversidad;
e) cometer el hecho aprovechando la circunstancia de una calamidad pública o de peligro inminente de ella;
f) cometer el hecho empleando un medio que provoque peligro común;
g) cometer el delito con abuso de poder, autoridad o confianza;
h) cometer el hecho de noche, o en despoblado, o en sitio de escaso tránsito u oscuro, escogidas estas circunstancias de propósito o aprovechándose de ellas;
i) cometer el delito aprovechando la indefensión de la víctima, o la dependencia o subordinación de ésta al ofensor;
j) el parentesco entre el ofensor y la víctima hasta el cuarto grado de consanguinidad. Esta agravante sólo se tiene en cuenta en los delitos contra la vida y la integridad corporal, y contra el normal desarrollo de las relaciones sexuales, la familia, la infancia y la juventud;
k) cometer el hecho no obstante existir amistad o afecto íntimo entre el ofensor y el ofendido;
l) cometer el delito bajo los efectos de la ingestión de bebidas alcohólicas y siempre que en tal situación se haya colocado voluntariamente el agente con el propósito de delinquir o que la embriaguez sea habitual;
ll) cometer el delito bajo los efectos de la ingestión, absorción o inyección de drogas tóxicas o sustancias alucinógenas, hipnóticas, estupefacientes u otras de efectos similares y siempre que en tal situación se haya colocado voluntariamente el agente con el propósito de delinquir o que sea toxicómano habitual;
m) cometer el hecho durante el cumplimiento de una sanción o durante el período de prueba correspondiente a su remisión condicional;
n) cometer el hecho después de haber sido objeto de la advertencia oficial efectuada por la autoridad competente.”

“CAPITULO I : INCUMPLIMIENTO DE NORMAS DE PROTECCIÓN E HIGIENE DEL TRABAJO

ARTICULO 296.1.- El responsable directo de la aplicación o ejecución de las medidas referentes a la protección e higiene del traba-jo que, a consecuencia de infringir, dentro del ámbito de su competencia, las disposiciones establecidas al respecto, dé lugar a que se produzca la muerte de algún trabajador, incu-rre en sanción de privación de libertad de dos a cinco años.
2. Si, como consecuencia de la infracción a que se refiere el apartado anterior, se producen lesiones graves o graves perjuicios para la salud a algún trabajador, la sanción es de seis meses a dos años o multa de dos-cientas a quinientas cuotas.
3. El que, por no haber ordenado, teniendo la obligación de hacerlo, las medidas de pro-tección e higiene del trabajo a quienes deban cumplirlas, dé lugar a que se produzca la muerte de un trabajador, incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de uno a tres años o multa de trescientas a mil cuotas.
4. Si, como consecuencia de la infracción a que se refiere el apartado anterior, se pro-ducen lesiones graves o graves perjuicios para la salud a algún trabajador, la sanción es de tres meses a un año o multa de cien a trescientas cuotas.

CAPITULO II : IMPOSICION INDEBIDA DE MEDIDAS DISCIPLINARIAS

ARTICULO 297.1.-El que sin estar legíti-mamente autorizado o estándolo, imponga a los trabajadores ilegalmente medidas disci-plinarias, incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de tres meses a un año o multa de cien a trescientas cuotas.
2. Cuando la medida disciplinaria ilegal se imponga por enemistad, venganza u otro fin malicioso, la sanción es de privación de liber-tad de seis meses a dos años o multa de doscientas a quinientas cuotas.”

“ARTICULO 347.1.- El que, sin estar legal-mente facultado, organice o promueva, con ánimo de lucro, la entrada en el territorio nacional de personas con la finalidad de que éstas emigren a terceros países, es sancionado con privación de libertad de siete a quince años.
2. En igual sanción incurre el que, sin es-tar facultado para ello y con ánimo de lucro, organice o promueva la salida del territorio nacional de personas que se encuentren en él con destino a terceros países.
ARTICULO 348.1.- El que penetre en el territorio nacional utilizando nave o aeronave u otro medio de transporte con la finalidad de realizar la salida ilegal de personas, incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de diez a veinte años.
2. La sanción es de privación de libertad de veinte a treinta años o privación perpetua cuando:

a) el hecho se efectúa portando el comisor un arma u otro instrumento idóneo para la agresión;
b) en la comisión del hecho se emplea vio-lencia o intimidación en las personas o fuerza en las cosas;
c) en la comisión del hecho se pone en pe-ligro la vida de las personas o resultan lesiones graves o la muerte de éstas;
ch) si entre las personas que se transportan, se encuentra alguna que sea menor de catorce años de edad.”

“ARTICULO 312.1.- (Modificado) El que utilice a una persona menor de 16 años de edad en prácticas de mendicidad, incurre en sanción de privación de libertad de dos a cin-co años o multa de quinientas a mil cuotas o ambas.
2. Si el hecho previsto en el apartado ante-rior se realiza por quien tenga la potestad, guarda o cuidado del menor, la sanción es de privación de libertad de tres a ocho años.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Cuba. If you are a representative of Cuba and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.