Data Dashboards

Dominican Republic
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2001 and 2014 decreased by 38%

-38%

2001- 2014

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.745 (2018)

Mean School Years: 7.9 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 40.2% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.7% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2008
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: 4.2% (2016)

Pension: 11.1% (2009)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: 84.8% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Dominican Republic, the percentage of child labourers has decreased) overall from 2001 to 2014.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014. 

** ckan error **
id=domhazfive
Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Dominican Republic, the latest estimates show that 1.2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The number is higher than in 2012, and but has decreased from 2.2 percent in 2001.

The measure provided for 2000 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for every year except 2002. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Dominican Republic, the latest estimates show that 6.4 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The percentage is the same as in 2012, but has decreased from 9.9 percent in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2014 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Dominican Republic was 26.3 hours. The average number of hours worked has increased from 20.2 hours in 2012.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2014, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 38.2 hours per week. This number has increased since 2012, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 24.8. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for every year except 2003. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores  5.9 hours per week according to the 2010 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2000, which found that children aged 5-14 in Dominican Republic worked an average of 8.3 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2010. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Dominican Republic is from 2014. By the 2014 estimate, the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Agriculture sector, the Other Services sector, the Manufacturing sector and Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Dominican Republic.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Dominican Republic.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Dominican Republic between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Dominican Republic is 0.745. This score indicates that human development is high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Dominican Republic over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Dominican Republic showed an increase in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Dominican Republic.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajos forzados

Constitución de la República Dominicana, 2015

“Artículo 40.- Derecho a la libertad y seguridad personal. Toda persona tiene derecho a la libertad y seguridad personal. Por lo tanto:
16) Las penas privativas de libertad y las medidas de seguridad estarán orientadas hacia la reeducación y reinserción social de la persona condenada y no podrán consistir en trabajos forzados;”

Trabajo infantil

Ley 136-03 Código para la protección de los derechos de los Niños, Niñas y los Adolescentes, 2003

Art. 40.- PROHIBICIÓN LABORAL. Se Prohíbe el trabajo de las personas menores de catorce años. La persona que por cualquier medio compruebe la violación a esta prohibición pondrá el hecho en conocimiento a la Secretaría de Estado de Trabajo y del Consejo Nacional para la Niñez y la Adolescencia (CONANI), a fin de que se adopten las medidas adecuadas para que dicho menor cese sus actividades laborales y se reincorpore al sistema educativo, en caso de que esté fuera del sistema.

Ley 16-92 que aprueba el Código de Trabajo, 1992

“Art. 17.- El menor emancipado, o el menor no emancipado que haya cumplido 16 años de edad, se reputan mayores de edad para los fines del contrato de trabajo.
El menor no emancipado, mayor de 14 años y menor de 16 puede, celebrar contrato de trabajo, percibir las retribuciones convenidas y las indemnizaciones fijadas en este Código y ejercer las acciones que de tales relaciones se derivan, con la autorización de su padre y de su madre o de aquél de éstos que tenga sobre el menor la autoridad, o a falta de ambos, de su tutor.
En caso de discrepancia de los padres o a falta de éstos y del tutor, el Juez de Paz del domicilio del menor podrá conceder la autorización.
En ningún caso el trabajo del menor podrá impedir su instrucción escolar obligatoria, la que estará a cargo y correrá por cuenta del empleador, bajo la supervigilancia de las autoridades, cuando por el hecho de dicho trabajo el menor no pueda recibir la instrucción escolar.”

“Art. 245.- Se prohíbe el trabajo de menores de catorce años.
No obstante, en beneficio del arte, de la ciencia o de la enseñanza, el Secretario de Estado de Trabajo, por medio de permisos individuales, podrá autorizar que menores de catorce años puedan ser empleados en espectáculos públicos, radio, televisión o películas cinematográficas como actores o figurantes.”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Ley 16-92 que aprueba el Código de Trabajo, 1992

“Art. 246.- Los menores de dieciséis años no pueden ser empleados ni trabajar de noche, durante un período de doce horas consecutivas, el cual será fijado por el Secretario de Estado de Trabajo y que, necesariamente, no podrá comenzar después de las ocho de la noche, ni terminar antes de las seis de la mañana.
No están sujetos a las limitaciones de este artículo los menores de dieciséis años que realicen trabajos en empresas familiares en las que solamente estén empleados los padres y sus hijos y pupilos.”

“Art. 251.- Se prohíbe el empleo de menores de dieciséis años en trabajos peligrosos o insalubres.
La Secretaría de Estado de Trabajo determinará cuáles son estos trabajos.”

Ley 137-03 sobre Trafico Ilícito de Migrantes y Trata de Personas

“ARTÍCULO 1.- Para los fines de la presente ley, se entenderá por:
b. Niño: Toda persona desde su nacimiento hasta los 12 años, inclusive;
c. Adolescente: Toda persona desde 13 años hasta la mayoría de edad: 18 años”

Resolución núm. 52/2004 sobre trabajos peligrosos e insalubres para personas menores de 18 años, 2004

Trata de personas

Ley 137-03 sobre Trafico Ilícito de Migrantes y Trata de Personas

“ARTÍCULO 1.- Para los fines de la presente ley, se entenderá por:
a. Trata de Personas: La captación, el transporte, el traslado, la acogida o la recepción de personas, recurriendo a la amenaza, a la fuerza, a la coaccion, al rapto, al fraude, al engaño, al abuso de poder, o situaciones de vulnerabilidad o a la concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre otra, con fines de explotación, para que ejerza cualquier forma de explotación sexual, pornografía, servidumbre por deudas, trabajos o servicios forzados, matrimonio servil, adopción irregular, esclavitud y/o practicas análogas a esta, o a la extracción de órganos;”

Esclavitud

Constitución de la República Dominicana, 2015

Artículo 41.- Prohibición de la esclavitud. Se prohíben en todas sus formas, la esclavitud, la servidumbre, la trata y el tráfico de personas.

 

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1956

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1958

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 1999 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

The scope of the Convention is limited to industry or to the economic activities set forth in article 5, paragraph 3. The employment of persons from twelve to fourteen years of age on light work is authorized as provided in article 7, paragraph 4.

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2000

Slavery Convention 1926, Accession not yet ratified

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1962

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2008

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1991

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2014

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Accession 2006

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Strategic Plan to Eradicate the Worst Forms of Child Labor (PEN) (2006–2020)

Identifies the roles and responsibilities of government agencies and municipal representatives in eradicating the worst forms of child labor. Prioritizes prevention, protection, assistance, and the progressive eradication of the worst forms of child labor. In 2017, conducted training sessions on child labor laws and programs for 499 members of the system to prevent and eradicate child labor.

Roadmap Towards the Elimination of Child Labor in the Dominican Republic (2016–2020)

Aims to eliminate child labor by 2020. Sets targets and indicators for poverty reduction, health, education, institutional coordination, awareness raising, and information sharing. In 2017, established 19 Local Vigilance Committees to combat child labor in high-risk municipalities.

Education Pact (2014–2030)

Seeks to improve the quality of, and access to, primary and secondary education by increasing attendance and graduation rates and enrolling more students in the Extended School Day Program. Includes strategies to combat child labor. Implemented by the Ministry of Education and supported by World Bank. In 2017, focused on improving recruitment and training of school teachers and increasing primary and secondary graduation rates.

National Development Strategy 2030

Aims to reduce poverty and inequality and includes programs that aim to combat child labor and provide universal education to all children. Includes strategies to expand access to secondary school, including for students without identity documents. Implemented by the Ministry of Economy.

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ley 137-03 sobre Trafico Ilícito de Migrantes y Trata de Personas

“DE LA ASISTENCIA Y PROTECCIÓN A LAS VÍCTIMAS
ARTÍCULO 9.- El Estado, a través de las instituciones correspondientes, protegerá la privacidad e identidad de la victima de la trata de personas, previendo la confidencialidad de las actuaciones judiciales.
PARRAFO.. Se proporcionará asistencia legal a la víctima de la trata de personas, para que sus opiniones y preocupaciones se presenten y examinen durante el proceso penal contra los delincuentes y/o traficantes.
ARTÍCULO 10.- Las víctimas de trata de personas recibirán atención física, psicólogica y social, así como asesoramiento e información con respecto a sus derechos. Esta asistencia la proporcionaran las entidades gubernamentales competentes en coordinación con organizaciones no gubernamentales y otros sectores de la sociedad civil.
PÁRRAFO I.- Se garantizará a las víctimas de la trata de personas alojamiento adecuado, atención médica, acceso a la educación, capacitación y oportunidad de empleo.
PÁRRAFO II.- Las victimas de trata de personas, sobre todo mujeres, niños, niñas y adolescentes, serán objeto de las evaluaciones psicológicas u otras requeridas para su protección, tomando en cuenta la edad y el sexo.”

“ARTÍCULO 11.- Asi mismo, las instituciones correspondientes estarán obligadas a desarrollar políticas, planes y programas con el propósito de prevenir y asistir a las víctimas de la trata de personas, y de proteger especialmente a los grupos vulnerables, mujeres, niños, niñas y adolescentes, contra un nuevo riesgo de victimización.
PÁRRAFO I.- Las instituciones gubernamentales, de común acuerdo con las organizaciones de la sociedad interesadas en la materia, realizaran las actividades destinadas a la investigación, campañas de difusión e iniciativas económicas y sociales con miras de prevenir y combatir la trata.
PÁRRAFO II.- El producto de las multas que se establece en la presente ley, para el delito de la trata de personas, se destinará para la indemnización de las victimas por daños físicos, morales, psicológicos y materiales, y para la ejecución de los planes, programas y proyectos que se establecen de conformidad con la presente ley, sin desmedro de las disposiciones que consagra la Ley No. 88-03, de fecha 1ro. de mayo del 2003, que instituye en todo el territorio nacional las Casas de Acogidas o Refugios que servirán de albergue seguro de manera temporal a las mujeres, niños, niñas y adolescentes y víctimas de violencia intrafamiliar o doméstica.”

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Ley 136-03 Código para la protección de los derechos de los Niños, Niñas y los Adolescentes, 2003

“Art. 44.- SANCIONES. Las violaciones, por acción u omisión, de las disposiciones contenidas en este capítulo, en las cuales incurra el empleador, constituirán falta muy grave y serán sancionadas conforme a los artículos 720 y siguientes del Código de Trabajo.
Párrafo I.- Cuando el empleador que emplee adolescentes se niegue a otorgar informes, documentos, inspecciones de lugares de trabajo requeridos por las autoridades competentes, comprometerá su responsabilidad y será sancionado conforme lo establecido en éste artículo.
Párrafo II.- El tribunal competente para imponer estas sanciones es la jurisdicción laboral. De ser necesario, podrá escucharse la declaración del adolescente, siempre en cámara de consejo.”

Art. 408.- SANCIÓN POR UTILIZAR UN NIÑO, NIÑA O ADOLESCENTE O DIFUNDIR IMÁGENES. Las personas o entidades que utilicen o empleen niños, niñas y adolescentes de uno u otro sexo en una producción teatral, televisiva o cinematográfica que presenten escenas de carácter pornográfico o de sexo, serán castigados con pena de uno (1) a cinco (5) años de privación de libertad y multa de tres (3) a diez (10) salarios mínimos establecido oficialmente, vigente al momento de cometer la infracción.

“Art. 409.- SANCIÓN POR COMERCIALIZACIÓN DE NIÑOS, NIÑAS Y ADOLESCENTES. Las personas o entidades que comercialicen con niños, niñas y adolescentes en cualquiera de las formas establecidas en el presente Código, serán castigados con penas de veinte (20) a treinta (30) años de reclusión y multa de cien (100) a ciento cincuenta (150) salarios mínimos establecido oficialmente, vigente al momento de cometer la infracción.
Párrafo- La tentativa de cometer cualquiera de los actos constitutivos de esta infracción se castigará como el crimen mismo.”

Art. 410.- SANCIÓN A LA EXPLOTACIÓN SEXUAL COMERCIAL DE NIÑO, NIÑA O ADOLESCENTE. Las personas, empresas o instituciones que utilicen a un niño, niña o adolescente en actividades sexuales a cambio de dinero, favores en especie o cualquier otra remuneración lo cual constituye explotación sexual comercial en la forma de prostitución de niños, niñas y adolescentes, así como quienes ayuden, faciliten o encubran a los que incurran en este delito, serán sancionados con la pena de reclusión de tres (3) a diez (10) años y multa de diez (10) a treinta (30) salarios mínimos establecido oficialmente, vigente al momento de cometer la infracción.

Ley 16-92 que aprueba el Código de Trabajo, 1992

“Art. 7207.- Las violaciones sujetas a sanciones penales, se clasifican en:
Leves: cuando se desconozcan obligaciones meramente formales o documentales, que no incidan en la seguridad de la persona ni en las condiciones del trabajo;
2. Graves: cuando se transgredan normas referentes a los salarios mínimos, a la protección del salario, al descanso semanal, a las horas extraordinarias o a todas aquellas relativas a la seguridad e higiene del trabajo, siempre que no pongan en peligro ni amenacen poner en peligro la vida, la salud o la seguridad de los trabajadores. En materia de los derechos colectivos, se reputan como grave el incumplimiento a las obligaciones estipuladas en el convenio colectivo;
3. Muy graves: cuando se violen las normas sobre protección a la maternidad, edad mínima para el trabajo, protección de menores, empleo de extranjeros, inscripción y pago de las cuotas al Instituto Dominicano de Seguros Sociales, y todas aquellas relativas a la seguridad e higiene del trabajo, siempre que de la violación se derive peligro o riesgo de peligro para la vida, la salud o la seguridad de los trabajadores. En materia de derechos colectivos, se reputa como muy grave, la comisión de prácticas desleales contrarias a la libertad sindical.”

“Art. 722.- Cuando el infractor sea una persona moral, la pena de prisión se aplicará a los administradores gerentes, representantes o personas que tengan la dirección de la empresa.
Art. 723.- Las disposiciones del artículo 463 del Código Penal son aplicables en esta materia.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ley 137-03 sobre Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes y Trata de Personas

ARTÍCULO 3.- Se considera pasible del delito de trata de personas el que mediante la captación, el transporte, el traslado, la acogida o receptación de personas, niños, adolescentes, mujeres, recurriendo a la amenaza, fuerza, coacción, rapto, fraude, engaño, abuso de poder, situaciones de vulnerabilidad, concesión o receptación de pagos o beneficios, para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre otra, para que ejerza la mendicidad, cualquier clase de explotación sexual, pornografía, trabajo o servicio forzado, servidumbre por deudas, matrimonio servil, adopción irregular, esclavitud o sus practicas análogas, la servidumbre o la extracción de órganos, aun con el consentimiento de la persona victima, y será condenado a las penas de 15 a 20 años de reclusión y multa de 175 salarios mínimos.

“ARTÍCULO 4.- Las personas morales son penalmente responsables y podrán condenarse por tráfico ilícito de migrantes y trata de personas cometido por cualquiera de sus orgános de gestión, de administración, de control o los que deban responder social, general o colectivamente o representantes por cuenta y en beneficio de tales personas jurídicas, con una, varias o todas las penas siguientes:
a. Multa del quíntuplo de la prevista para las personas físicas;
b. La disolución, cuando la infracción se trate de un hecho incriminado de conformidad con la presente ley, como crimen o delito imputado a las personas físicas, con una pena privativa de libertad superior a cinco años;
c. La prohibición, a título definitivo o por un período no mayor de cinco años, de ejercer, directa o indirectamente, una o varias actividades profesionales o sociales;
d. La sujeción a la vigilancia judicial por un período no mayor de cinco años;
e. La clausura definitiva o por un período no mayor de cinco años, de uno o varios de los establecimientos principales, sedes, sucursales, agencias y locales de la empresa que han servido para la comisión de los hechos incriminados;
f. La exclusión de participar en los concursos públicos, a título definitivo o por un período no mayor de cinco años, ni en actividades destinadas a la captación de valores provenientes del ahorro público o privado;
g. La prohibición, por un período no mayor de cinco años, de emitir efectos de comercio: cheques, letras de cambio, pagares, excepto aquellos que permiten el retiro de fondos en los que el librador es el beneficiario de los mismos, o aquellos que son certificados; o de utilizar tarjetas de crédito;
h. La confiscación de la cosa que ha servido o estaba destinada a cometer la infracción o de la cosa que es su producto;
i. La publicación de la sentencia pronunciada o la difusión de esta, sea por la prensa escrita o por otro medio de comunicación audiovisual, radiofónico, electrónico y/o cualquier otro medio que pudiere presentarse.
PÁRRAFO I.- La responsabilidad penal de las personas morales no excluye la de cualquier persona fisica autor o cómplice de los mismos hechos,
PÁRRAFO 11.- Las penas enumeradas en los incisos de la a) a la i) del presente artículo se aplicaran a las personas morales de derecho público, a los partidos, movimientos o agrupaciones políticas, a los sindicatos o asociaciones profesionales conocidas como tales en virtud de la ley.”

“ARTÍCULO 7.- Se consideran circunstancias agravantes del delito de tráfico ilícito de migrantes o trata de personas:
Cuando se produzca la muerte del o de las personas involucradas u objetos del tráfico ilícito de migrantes o la trata de personas, o cuando la víctima resulte afectada de un daño físico o psíquico temporal o permanente;
Cuando uno o varios de 10s autores de la infraccion sea(n) funcionario(s) público(s), electo(s) o no, de la administración central, descentralizada, autónoma, o miembro de las Fuerzas Armadas o de la Policía Nacional;
Cuando se trate de un grupo delictivo que pueda definirse como crimen organizado nacional o transnacional, debido a la participación en el tráfico ilícito de migrantes o trata de personas;
Cuando exista una pluralidad de agraviados como resultado de los hechos incriminados;
Si se realizan estas conductas en personas que padezcan inmadurez psicológica, o trastorno mental, enajenación mental temporal o permanente, o sean menores de 18 años;
Cuando el responsable sea cónyuge o conviviente o pariente hasta el tercer grado de consaguinidad, primero de afinidad
Cuando el sujeto o los sujetos reincidan en las conductas de trata de personas y tráfico ilegal de migrantes;
El que Cree, altere, produzca o falsifique documentos de viajes o identidad, suministre o facilite la posesión de tales documentos, o que, a través de dichos documentos, o cualquier otro, promueva u obtenga por causa ilícita visado para si u otra persona.
PÁRRAFO I.- Para las agravantes señaladas en el anterior artículo, se establece una pena de cinco (5) años, en adición a la pena principal para los delitos descritos en la presente ley.
PÁRRAFO 11.- Para el cálculo de las multas consignadas por la presente ley, se utilizara como base el salario mínimo establecido por la autoridad competente en materia laboral, a la fecha que se cometa la infracción.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled