Data Dashboards

Ecuador
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2001 and 2016 decreased by 66%

-66%

2001- 2016

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.758 (2018)

Mean School Years: 9.0 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 46.2% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 3.6% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2002
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 31.7% (2016)

Unemployed: 4.2% (2005)

Pension: 52.0% (2016)

Vulnerable: 11.3% (2016)

Children: 6.7% (2016)

Disabled: 34.5% (2016)

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes: 

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Ecuador, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2001 to 2016.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2016. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Ecuador, the latest estimates show that 4.2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2016. The number is higher than in 2015 , but has decreased from 12.5 percent in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2016. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Ecuador, the latest estimates show that 11.2 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2016. The percentage is lower than in 2015, and has decreased from 31.4 percent in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2016. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2016 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Ecuador was 10.7 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 12.0 hours in 2015.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2016. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2016, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 24.2 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2015, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 26.5. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and 2016. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 6.9 hours per week according to the 2012 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2011, which found that children aged 5-14 in Ecuador worked an average of 10.4 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Ecuador is from 2016. By the 2016 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Manufacturing sector, the Other Services sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Ecuador.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

 

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Ecuador.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Ecuador between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Ecuador is 0.758. This score indicates that human development is high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Ecuador over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Ecuador showed an increase in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Ecuador.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Código del Trabajo, 1978

“Art. 3.- Libertad de trabajo y contratación.­ El trabajador es libre para dedicar su esfuerzo a la labor lícita que a bien tenga.
Ninguna persona podrá ser obligada a realizar trabajos gratuitos, ni remunerados que no sean impuestos por la ley, salvo los casos de urgencia extraordinaria o de necesidad de inmediato auxilio.
Fuera de esos casos, nadie estará obligado a trabajar sino mediante un contrato y la remuneración correspondiente.
En general, todo trabajo debe ser remunerado.”

Código Orgánico Integral Penal, 2014

“Artículo 105.- Trabajos forzados u otras formas de explotación laboral. La persona que someta a trabajos forzados u otras formas de explotación o servicios laborales, dentro o fuera del país, será sancionada con pena privativa de libertad de diez a trece años.
Habrá trabajos forzados u otras formas de explotación o servicios laborales en los siguientes casos:

1. Cuando se obligue o engañe a una persona para que realice, contra su voluntad, un trabajo o servicio bajo amenaza de causarle daño a ella o a terceras personas.
2. Cuando en estos se utilice a niñas, niños o adolescentes menores a quince años de edad.
3. Cuando se utilice a adolescentes mayores a quince años de edad en trabajos peligrosos, nocivos o riesgosos de acuerdo con lo estipulado por las normas correspondientes.
4. Cuando se obligue a una persona a realizar un trabajo o servicio utilizando la violencia o amenaza.
5. Cuando se obligue a una persona a comprometer o prestar sus servicios personales o los de alguien sobre quien ejerce autoridad, como garantía de una deuda, aprovechando su condición de deudora.
6. Cuando se obligue a una persona a vivir y trabajar en una tierra que pertenece a otra persona y a prestar a esta, mediante remuneración o gratuitamente, determinados servicios sin libertad para cambiar su condición.”

Artículo 108.- Empleo de personas para mendicidad.- La persona que facilite, colabore, promueva o se beneficie al someter a mendicidad a otra persona, será sancionada con pena privativa de libertad de diez a trece años.

Trabajo de Menores

Código del Trabajo, 1978

“Art. 134.- Prohibición del trabajo de niños, niñas y adolescentes.­ (Sustituido por el Art. 4 de la Ley 2006­39, R.O. 250, 13­IV­2006).­ Prohíbase toda clase de trabajo, por cuenta ajena, a los niños, niñas y adolescentes menores de quince años. El empleador que viole esta prohibición pagará al menor de quince años el doble de la remuneración, no estará exento de cumplir con todas las obligaciones laborales y sociales derivadas de la relación laboral, incluidas todas las prestaciones y beneficios de la seguridad social, y será sancionado con el máximo de la multa prevista en el artículo 95 del Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, y con la clausura del establecimiento en caso de reincidencia.
Las autoridades administrativas, jueces y empleadores observarán las normas contenidas en el TÍTULO V, del LIBRO I del Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, en especial respecto a la erradicación del trabajo infantil, los trabajos formativos como prácticas culturales, los derechos laborales y sociales, así como las medidas de protección de los niños, niñas y adolescentes contra la explotación laboral.”

Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, 2002

“Art. 82.- Edad mínima para el trabajo.- Se fija en quince años la edad mínima para todo tipo de trabajo, incluido el servicio doméstico, con las salvedades previstas en este Código, más leyes e instrumentos internacionales con fuerza legal en el país.
La infracción a lo dispuesto en el inciso anterior, no libera al patrono de cumplir con las obligaciones laborales y sociales que le impone la relación de trabajo.
El Ministerio encargado de las Relaciones Laborales, de oficio o a petición de cualquier entidad pública o privada, podrá autorizar edades mínimas por sobre la señalada en el inciso anterior, de conformidad con lo establecido en este Código, la ley y en los instrumentos internacionales legalmente ratificados por el Ecuador.
Nota: Inciso tercero reformado por Ley No. 0, publicada en Registro Oficial Suplemento 283 de 7 de Julio del 2014.”

“Art. 91.- Trabajo doméstico.- Los adolescentes que trabajen en el servicio doméstico tendrán los mismos derechos y garantías que los adolescentes trabajadores en general.
El patrono velará por la integridad física, psicológica y moral del adolescente y garantizará sus derechos a la alimentación, educación, salud, descanso y recreación.”

“Capítulo III
Trabajo sin relación de dependencia
Art. 93.- Trabajo por cuenta propia.- Los municipios otorgarán, en sus respectivas jurisdicciones, los permisos para que los adolescentes que hayan cumplido quince años ejerzan actividades económicas por cuenta propia, siempre que no sean de aquellas consideradas como perjudiciales o nocivas o que se encuentren prohibidas en este u otros cuerpos legales.
Cada Municipio llevará un registro de estas autorizaciones y controlará el desarrollo de las actividades autorizadas a los adolescentes.
Los adolescentes autorizados de conformidad con el inciso anterior, recibirán del Municipio un carnet laboral que les proporcionará los siguientes beneficios: acceso gratuito a los espectáculos públicos que determine el reglamento, acceso preferente a programas de protección tales como comedores populares, servicios médicos, albergues nocturnos, matrícula gratuita y exención de otros pagos en los centros educativos fiscales y municipales.
El Ministerio encargado de las Relaciones Laborales dictará el Reglamento para la emisión del carnet laboral y la regulación de los beneficios que otorga.”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Constitución Política de la República del Ecuador, 2008

“Art. 46.- El Estado adoptará, entre otras, las siguientes medidas que aseguren a las niñas, niños y adolescentes:
1. Atención a menores de seis años, que garantice su nutrición, salud, educación y cuidado diario en un marco de protección integral de sus derechos.
2. Protección especial contra cualquier tipo de explotación laboral o económica. Se prohíbe el trabajo de menores de quince años, y se implementarán políticas de erradicación progresiva del trabajo infantil. El trabajo de las adolescentes y los adolescentes será excepcional, y no podrá conculcar su derecho a la educación ni realizarse en situaciones nocivas o peligrosas para su salud o su desarrollo personal. Se respetará, reconocerá y respaldará su trabajo y las demás actividades siempre que no atenten a su formación y a su desarrollo integral.”

MDT-2015-0131 Expidese el listado de actividades peligrosas en el trabajo de adolescentes

Codigo del Trabajo, 1978

“Art. 138.- Trabajos prohibidos a menores.- (Sustituido por el Art. 7 de la Ley 2006­39, R.O. 250, 13­IV­2006).­ Se prohíbe ocupar a mujeres y varones menores de dieciocho años en industrias o tareas que sean consideradas como peligrosas e insalubres, las que serán puntualizadas en un reglamento especial que será elaborado por el Consejo Nacional de la Niñez y Adolescencia, en coordinación con el Comité Nacional para la Erradicación Progresiva del Trabajo Infantil­ CONEPTI, de acuerdo a lo previsto en el Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia y los convenios internacionales ratificados por el país.
Se prohíbe las siguientes formas de trabajo:

1. Todas las formas de esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, como la venta y el tráfico de niños, la servidumbre por deudas y la condición de siervo, y el trabajo forzoso u obligatorio, incluido el reclutamiento forzoso u obligatorio de niños para utilizarlos en conflictos armados;
2. La utilización, el reclutamiento o la oferta de niños para la prostitución, la producción de pornografía o actuaciones pornográficas y trata de personas;
3. La utilización o la oferta de niños para la realización de actividades ilícitas en particular la producción y el tráfico de estupefacientes, tal como se definen en los tratados internacionales pertinentes;
y,
4. El trabajo que por su naturaleza o por las condiciones en que se lleva a cabo, es probable que dañe la salud, la seguridad o la moralidad de los niños, como en los casos siguientes:

a) La destilación de alcoholes y la fabricación o mezcla de licores;
b) La fabricación de albayalde, minio o cualesquiera otras materias colorantes tóxicas, así como la manipulación de pinturas, esmaltes o barnices que contengan sales de plomo o arsénico;
c) La fabricación o elaboración de explosivos, materias inflamables o cáusticas y el trabajo en locales o sitios en que se fabriquen, elaboren o depositen cualesquiera de las antedichas materias;
d) La talla y pulimento de vidrio, el pulimento de metales con esmeril y el trabajo en cualquier local o sitio en que ocurra habitualmente desprendimiento de polvo o vapores irritantes o tóxicos;
e) La carga o descarga de navíos, aunque se efectúe por medio de grúas o cabrías;
f) Los trabajos subterráneos o canteras;
g) El trabajo de maquinistas o fogoneros;
h) El manejo de correas, cierras circulares y otros mecanismos peligrosos;
i) La fundición de vidrio o metales;
j) El transporte de materiales incandescentes;
k) El expendio de bebidas alcohólicas, destiladas o fermentadas;
l) La pesca a bordo;
m) La guardianía o seguridad; y,
n) En general, los trabajos que constituyan un grave peligro para la moral o para el desarrollo físico de mujeres y varones menores de la indicada edad.
En el caso del trabajo de adolescentes mayores de quince años y menores de dieciocho años, se considerarán además las prohibiciones previstas en el artículo 87 del Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, así como los trabajos prohibidos para adolescentes que determine el Consejo Nacional de la Niñez y Adolescencia.”

Codigo de la Ninez y Adolescencia, 2002

“Capítulo I
Disposiciones Generales
Art. 81.- Derecho a la protección contra la explotación laboral.- Los niños, niñas y adolescentes tienen derecho a que el Estado, la sociedad y la familia les protejan contra la explotación laboral y económica y cualquier forma de esclavitud, servidumbre, trabajo forzoso o nocivo para su salud, su desarrollo físico, mental, espiritual, moral o social, o que pueda entorpecer el ejercicio de su derecho a la educación.”

“Art. 83.- Erradicación del trabajo infantil.- El Estado y la sociedad deben elaborar y ejecutar políticas, planes, programas y medidas de protección tendientes a erradicar el trabajo de los niños, niñas y de los adolescentes que no han cumplido quince años. La familia debe contribuir al logro de este objetivo.”

“Art. 87.- Trabajos prohibidos.- Se prohíbe el trabajo de adolescentes:

1. En minas, basurales, camales, canteras e industrias extractivas de cualquier clase;
2. En actividades que implican la manipulación de substancias explosivas, psicotrópicas, tóxicas, peligrosas o nocivas para su vida, su desarrollo físico o mental y su salud;
3. En prostíbulos o zonas de tolerancia, lugares de juegos de azar, expendio de bebidas alcohólicas y otros que puedan ser inconvenientes para el desarrollo moral o social del adolescente;
4. En actividades que requieran el empleo de maquinaria peligrosa o que lo exponen a ruidos que exceden los límites legales de tolerancia;
5. En una actividad que pueda agravar la discapacidad, tratándose de adolescentes que la tengan;
6. En las demás actividades prohibidas en otros cuerpos legales, incluidos los instrumentos internacionales ratificados por el Ecuador; y,
7. En hogares cuyos, miembros tengan antecedentes como autores de abuso o maltrato.
El Ministerio encargado de las Relaciones Laborales determinará las formas específicas de trabajo peligroso, nocivo o riesgoso que están prohibidos para los adolescentes, tomando en cuenta su naturaleza, condiciones y riesgo para su vida e integridad personal, salud, educación, seguridad y desarrollo integral.”

Trata de personas

Ley Orgánica de Movilidad Humana, de 5 de enero de 2017, que regula el ejercicio de derechos, obligaciones, institucionalidad y mecanismos vinculados a las personas en movilidad humana

“Definiciones y principios sobre la trata de personas o el tráfico ilícito de migrantes
Artículo 117.- Víctima de trata de personas o tráfico ilícito de migrantes. Es víctima de trata de personas quien haya sido objeto de captación, transporte, traslado, entrega, acogida o recepción, en el país, desde o hacia otros países, con fines de explotación de la que resulte un provecho material o económico, una ventaja inmaterial o cualquier otro beneficio para un tercero.
Es víctima de tráfico ilícito de migrantes la persona que haya sido objeto de migración ilícita desde o hacia el territorio del Estado ecuatoriano, con el fin de obtener beneficio económico de manera directa o indirecta, u otro beneficio de orden material en favor de un tercero.”

Código Orgánico Integral Penal, 2014

“Artículo91.-Trata de personas.-La captación, transportación, traslado, entrega, acogida o recepción para sí o para un tercero, de una o más personas, ya sea dentro del país o desde o hacia otros países con fines de explotación, constituye delito de trata de personas.
Constituye explotación, toda actividad de la que resulte un provecho material o económico, una ventaja inmaterial o cualquier otro beneficio, para sí o para un tercero, mediante el sometimiento de una persona o la imposición de condiciones de vida o de trabajo, obtenidos de:

1. La extracción o comercialización ilegal de órganos, tejidos, fluidos o material genético de personas vivas, incluido el turismo para la donación o trasplante de órganos.
2. La explotación sexual de personas incluida la prostitución forzada, el turismo sexual y la pornografía infantil.
3. La explotación laboral, incluido el trabajo forzoso, la servidumbre por deudas y el trabajo infantil.
4. Promesa de matrimonio o unión de hecho servil, incluida la unión de hecho precoz, arreglada, como indemnización o transacción, temporal o para fines de procreación.
5. La adopción ilegal de niñas, niños y adolescentes.
6. La mendicidad.
7. Reclutamiento forzoso para conflictos armados o para el cometimiento de actos penados por la ley.
8. Cualquier otra modalidad de explotación.”

Esclavitud

Constitución Política de la República del Ecuador, 2008

“Art. 66.- Se reconoce y garantizará a las personas:

1. El derecho a la inviolabilidad de la vida. No habrá pena de muerte.
2. El derecho a una vida digna, que asegure la salud, alimentación y nutrición, agua potable, vivienda, saneamiento ambiental, educación, trabajo, empleo, descanso y ocio, cultura física, vestido, seguridad social y otros servicios sociales necesarios.
3. El derecho a la integridad personal, que incluye:

b) Una vida libre de violencia en el ámbito público y privado. El Estado adoptará las medidas necesarias para prevenir, eliminar y sancionar toda forma de violencia, en especial la ejercida contra las mujeres, niñas, niños y adolescentes, personas adultas mayores, personas con discapacidad y contra toda persona en situación de desventaja o vulnerabilidad; idénticas medidas se tomarán contra la violencia, la esclavitud y la explotación sexual.

29. Los derechos de libertad también incluyen:

a) El reconocimiento de que todas las personas nacen libres.
b) La prohibición de la esclavitud, la explotación, la servidumbre y el tráfico y la trata de seres humanos en todas sus formas. El Estado adoptará medidas de prevención y erradicación de la trata de personas, y de protección y reinserción social de las víctimas de la trata y de otras formas de violación de la libertad.”

 

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1954

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1962

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 2000 (minimum age specified: 15 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2000

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Definitive signature 1955

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1960

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratification 2002

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Accession 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratification 2004

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2004

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Plan to Eradicate Child Labor (2015–2017)

Establish strategy to eradicate child labor in Ecuador by 2017. The Plan, approved in 2016, is being implemented.

Lifetime Plan (Plan Toda Una Vida) (2017–2021)

Aims to support vulnerable populations from birth to advanced age through a series of social welfare programs. Aims to reduce child labor of children between ages 5 and 14 to 2.7 percent by 2021. Launched on November 28, 2017. Led by the Technical Secretariat for the Lifetime Plan.

National Plan to Combat Human Trafficking, Sexual and Labor Exploitation, and Other Forms of Exploitation

Establish processes to prevent, investigate, and impose legal sanctions against human trafficking, commercial sexual exploitation, and other forms of abuse. Enacted by decree in 2006 to protect and restore the rights of victims. In 2017, the government failed to approve the revised version of this plan and instead continued to operate under an older version.

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ley Orgánica de Movilidad Humana, de 5 de enero de 2017, que regula el ejercicio de derechos, obligaciones, institucionalidad y mecanismos vinculados a las personas en movilidad humana

“Artículo 1.- Objeto y ámbito. La presente Ley tiene por objeto regular el ejercicio de derechos, obligaciones, institucionalidad y mecanismos vinculados a las personas en movilidad humana, que comprende emigrantes, inmigrantes, personas en tránsito, personas ecuatorianas retornadas, quienes requieran de protección internacional, víctimas de los delitos de trata de personas y de tráfico ilícito de migrantes; y, sus familiares.
Para el caso de las víctimas de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, esta Ley tiene por objeto establecer el marco de prevención, protección, atención y reinserción que el Estado desarrollará a través de las distintas políticas públicas, de conformidad con el ordenamiento jurídico.

Artículo 2.- Principios. Son principios de la presente Ley:
Protección de las personas ecuatorianas en el exterior.
El Estado ecuatoriano promoverá acciones orientadas a garantizar a las personas ecuatorianas en el exterior el efectivo reconocimiento y respeto de los derechos humanos, independientemente de su condición migratoria. El Estado ecuatoriano velará por el respeto y reconocimiento de los derechos humanos de la comunidad ecuatoriana en el exterior, mediante acciones diplomáticas ante otros Estados.”

Código Orgánico Integral Penal, 2014

“Artículo 93.- Principio de no punibilidad de la víctima de trata.- La víctima no es punible por la comisión de cualquier delito que sea el resultado directo de haber sido objeto de trata.
Tampoco se aplicarán las sanciones o impedimentos previstos en la legislación migratoria cuando las infracciones son consecuencia de la actividad desplegada durante la comisión del ilícito del que fueron sujetas.”

Policies for Assistance, Child Labour

Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, 2002

“Art. 94.- Medidas de protección.- En los casos de infracción a las disposiciones del presente título, los jueces y autoridades administrativas competentes podrán ordenar una o más de las siguientes medidas de protección a favor de los niños, niñas y adolescentes afectados, sin perjuicio de las demás contempladas en este Código:

1. La orden de separar al niño, niña o adolescente de la actividad laboral;
2. La inserción del niño, niña o adolescente y/o su familia, en un programa de protección; y,
3. La separación temporal del medio familiar del niño, niña, adolescente o agresor, según sea el caso.
Se adoptarán las providencias necesarias para que la aplicación de estas medidas no afecte los derechos y garantías de los niños, niñas y adolescentes, más allá de las restricciones inherentes a cada una de ellas; y para asegurar el sustento diario del niño, niña o adolescente, de una manera compatible con su derecho a una vida digna.”

Policies for Assistance, General

Programa de Protección a Testigos y Víctimas, 2002

Código Orgánico Integral Penal, 2014

“TÍTULO III DERECHOS
CAPÍTULO PRIMERO DERECHOS DE LA VÍCTIMA
TÍTULO III REPARACIÓN INTEGRAL
CAPÍTULO ÚNICO REPARACIÓN INTEGRAL”

Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, 2002

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Código del Trabajo, 1978

“Art. 148.- Sanciones.- (Reformado por el Art. 13 de la Ley 2006­39, R.O. 250, 13­IV­2006).­ Las violaciones a las normas establecidas en los artículos del 139 al 147 inclusive, serán sancionadas con multas que serán impuestas de conformidad con lo previsto en el artículo 628 de este Código, impuestas por el Director Regional del Trabajo, según el caso, y previo informe del inspector del trabajo respectivo.
Sin perjuicio de las sanciones previstas en el inciso anterior, si las violaciones se refieren al trabajo de adolescentes, los Directores Regionales de Trabajo o los inspectores del Trabajo en las jurisdicciones en donde no exista Directores Regionales, impondrán las sanciones establecidas en el artículo 95 del Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia.”

Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia, 2002

“Art. 95.- Sanciones aplicables por violación a las disposiciones referentes al trabajo.- La violación de las prohibiciones contenidas en este título, será reprimida con una o más de las siguientes sanciones, sin perjuicio de las contempladas en otros cuerpos legales:

1. Amonestación a los progenitores o a las personas encargadas del cuidado del niño, niña o adolescente; y a quienes los empleen o se beneficien directamente con su trabajo;
2. Multa de cincuenta a trescientos dólares, si los infractores son los progenitores o responsables del cuidado del niño, niña o adolescente;
3. Multa de doscientos a mil dólares, si se trata del empleador o cualquier persona que se beneficie directa o indirectamente del trabajo del niño, niña o adolescente; y,
4. Clausura del establecimiento donde se realiza el trabajo, en caso de reincidencia.
Nota: El Ministerio encargado de las Relaciones Laborales asumirá la competencia del artículo 95, numeral 4 del Código de la Niñez y Adolescencia. Dado por disposición reformatoria cuarta de Ley No. 0, publicada en Registro Oficial Suplemento 283 de 7 de Julio del 2014 .”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Código Orgánico Integral Penal, 2014

“Artículo 92.- Sanción para el delito de trata de personas.- La trata de personas será sancionada:

1. Con pena privativa de libertad de trece a dieciséis años.
2. Con pena privativa de libertad de dieciséis a diecinueve años, si la infracción recae en personas de uno de los grupos de atención prioritaria o en situación de doble vulnerabilidad o si entre la víctima y el agresor ha existido relación afectiva, consensual de pareja, conyugal, convivencia, de familia o de dependencia económica o exista vínculo de autoridad civil, militar, educativa, religiosa o laboral.
3. Con pena privativa de libertad de diecinueve a veintidós años, si con ocasión de la trata de personas, la víctima ha sufrido enfermedades o daños psicológicos o físicos graves o de carácter irreversible.
4.Con pena privativa de libertad de veintidós a veintiséis años, si por motivo de la trata de personas se produce la muerte de la víctima.
La trata se persigue y sanciona con independencia de otros delitos que se hayan cometido en su ejecución o como su consecuencia.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled