Data Dashboards

Haiti
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data with a complete statistical definition is only provided for 2006. There is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.503 (2018)

Mean School Years: 5.4 years (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 85.0% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 16.8% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2007
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2011
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 1.0% (2000)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Haiti, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2006. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Haiti, the latest estimates show that 0.1 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The number is the same as in 2006.

All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but use the same, reduced definition. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006 and 2012. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Haiti, the latest estimates show that 1.2 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2006.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2012 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Haiti was 5.8 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 6.3 hours in 2006.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006 and 2012.

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2012, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 6.8 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2006, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 7.5. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006 and 2012.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores  9.2 hours per week according to the 2012 estimate. This estimate represents a increase in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2006, which found that children aged 5-14 in Haiti worked an average of 8.4 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2006 and 2012. 

 

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Haiti.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Haiti.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Haiti between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Haiti is 0.503. This score indicates that human development is low. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Haiti over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Haiti showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Haiti.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Legally Defining 8.7
Travail forcé

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

1.1 Définitions
Au sens de la présente Loi :
1.1.11 L ’ expression « travail forcé » désigne tout travail ou service exigé d’ une personne sous la menace de représailles quelconques et pour lesquelles ladite personne n’a pas donné son consentement de plein gré.
Le travail forcé peut impliquer l’offre et la conclusion d’un contrat de travail qui peut être utilisé à des fins de traite et visant à générer de façon illicite un gain pour les trafiquants.

Code du travail, 1984

Article 4. Aucun citoyen ne peut être contraint au travail forcé ou obligatoire sauf le cas d’une condamnation prononcée par un tribunal répressif légalement saisi. Est considéré comme travail forcé tout travail exécuté par un individu sous la menace d’un châtiment quelconque et sans son consentement.

Article 8. Le travail, fonction sociale, jouit de la protection de l’État et n’est pas un article d’exploitation.
En s’engageant à accomplir un travail socialement utile, le travailleur ne vend ni son travail, ni sa personne; il accomplit un devoir civique et a droit, de ce fait, à la protection de l’État.
L’État doit employer toutes ses ressources pour donner une occupation au travailleur manuel ou intellectuel et lui assurer ainsi qu’à sa famille les conditions économiques d’une existence digne.

Travail des enfants

Constitution de la Republique d’Haiti, 1987

Article 35.6:
La loi la limite d’âge pour le travail salarié. Des Lois Spéciales règlementent le travail des enfants mineurs et des gens de maison.

Code du travail, 1984

Article 10. Les mineurs ayant atteint l’âge auquel ils sont admis à travailler dans les établissements industriels, agricoles et commerciaux font l’objet d’une protection spéciale.
Chaque enfant a droit à une instruction professionnelle appropriée en plus de l’enseignement primaire obligatoire.

Loi du 11 septembre 2017 portant organisation et réglementation du travail sur la durée de vingt-quatre (24) heures, répartie en trois (3) tranches de huit (8) heures

Article 10.-Est illégal et punissable conformément à l’article 340 du Code du Travail, le fait de faire travailler des enfants et des adolescents de moins de seize (16) ans. Cette peine est doublée si ce travail est effectué durant la nuit.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

1.1 Définitions
Au sens de la présente Loi :
1.1.8 Le terme « enfant » désigne toute personne de moins de 18 ans.
1.1.21 L ’ expression « mendicité forcée » est la circonscription ou l’ incorporation obligatoire, forcée ou volontaire d’enfants, dans un groupe ou association de quelque nature que ce soit, afin de les contraindre à mendier et à en récupérer les fruits.

Loi du 5 juin 2003 relative à l’interdiction et à l’élimination de toutes formes d’abus, de violences, de mauvais traitements ou traitements inhumains contre les enfants.

Article 2.-Les abus et violences de toutessortes contre les enfants, de même que leur exploitation sont interdits. Par abus et violences de toutes sortes contre les enfants, il faut entendre tous mauvais traitements ou traitements inhumains à leur égard y compris leur exploitation et ce, sans erestreindre la généralité des énumérations suivantes:

a. La vente et le trafic d’enfants, al servitude ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire de même que les services forcés;
b. L’offre de recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement, l’accueil ou l’utilisation d’enfants aux fins d’exploitation sexuelle, de prostitution, de pornographie;
c. L’offre, le recrutement, le transfert, l’hébergement, l’accueil ou l’utilisation d’enfants aux fins d’activités criminelles;
d. L’offre, le recruitement, le transfert, l’hébergement, l’accueil ou l’utilisation d’enfants aux fins de prélèvements d’organes ou cobayes scientifiques;
e. Les travaux qui sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité ou à la moralité de l’enfant de par leur nature ou les conditions dans lesquelles ills exercent;
f. Le recrutement d’enfants en vue de leur utilisation dans les conflits armés.

Code du travail, 1984

Article 333. Les mineurs ne pourront être occupés à des travaux insalubres, pénibles ou dangereux du point de vue physique ou moral, ni prêter leurs services dans les lieux où se débitent les boissons alcooliques.

Article 334. Les mineurs de moins de dix-huit ans ne pourront travailler la nuit dans des entreprises industrielles, publiques ou privées, ou dans leurs dépendances. Aux effets de cet article, le terme «nuit» signifie une période d’au moins douze heures consécutives. Pour les mineurs de moins de seize ans, cette période comprendra l’intervalle écoulé entre 10 heures du soir et 6 heures du matin et pour les mineurs de seize ans révolus et de moins de dix-huit ans, cette période comprendra un intervalle d’au moins sept heures consécutives s’insérant entre 10 heures du soir et 7 heures du matin.

Article 335. Les mineurs âgés de moins de quinze ans ne pourront travailler dans les entreprises industrielles, agricoles ou commerciales.

Article 337. Tout mineur de quinze à dix-huit ans devra obtenir préalablement à son entrée en service dans un établissement agricole, industriel ou commercial, un certificat ou permis d’emploi délivré sans frais par la Direction du travail.

Traite des personnes

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

1.1 Définitions
Au sens de la présente Loi :
1.1.1 L’expression « traite des personnes » désigne le recrutement, le transport, l’hébergement ou l’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, par la fraude, la tromperie, par abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre à des fins d’exploitation.
L’exploitation doit inclure au minimum le travail forcé ou la servitude, l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui ou le proxénétisme, la pornographie ou d’autres formes d’exploitation sexuelle, le mariage forcé ou à des fins d’exploitation, la mendicité forcée, le prélèvement d’organes ou de tissus et l’adoption réalisée à des fins d’exploitation telle que définie dans la présente Loi.
Tout consentement donné par une personne dans les conditions ci-dessus énumérées, ayant abouti aux fins d’exploitations citées ci-dessus, n’est jamais valable lorsque l’un quelconque des moyens énoncés au premier alinéa a été utilisé.
Le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’un enfant ou l’accueil d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation sont considérés comme une « traite des personnes » même s’ils ne font appel à aucun des moyens énoncés au premier alinéa.
1.1.5 L ’ expression « formes graves de traite des personnes » s’ applique à la traite des personnes à des fins d’exploitation sexuelle, lorsque celle-ci implique l’accomplissement d’un acte sexuel à des fins commerciales induit par le recours à la force, à la fraude, ou à la coercition, ou lorsque la personne qui l’ accomplit n’ a pas atteint l’ âge de la majorité.

Servitude

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

1.1 Définitions
Au sens de la présente Loi :
1.1.13 Le terme « servitude » est l’état de soumission ou la condition de dépendance d’une personne illicitement forcée ou contrainte par une personne de fournir un service à celle-ci ou à autrui, et qui n’a d’autre alternative que de fournir ledit service. La servitude peut comprendre également les services domestiques.
Article 1.2
1.1.14 Le terme « servitude pour dettes » est considéré comme l’état ou la condition résultant du fait qu’un débiteur s’est engagé à fournir, sans limite de temps, en garantie d’une dette, ses services personnels ou ceux de quelqu’un sur lequel il a autorité.

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1958

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1958

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 2009 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2007

Slavery Convention 1926, Accession 1927

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Ratification 1958

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratification 2011

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1995

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Signed 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2014

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Persons (2015–2017)

Aims to enhance the legal framework to prevent human trafficking, effectively implement laws related to human trafficking, provide protection and care for victims, and strengthen social and educational initiatives for vulnerable children. Led by the National Committee for the Fight Against Trafficking in Persons. In 2017, partnered with the EU to conduct a survey on human trafficking in Haiti.

National Child Protection Policy (2016–2020)

Aims to protect children from abuse, violence, and labor exploitation, and promotes improved access to education and livelihood services for vulnerable children, with a focus on domestic workers. Led by IBESR and supported by international donors.

National Strategic Development Plan (PSDH) (2014–2019)

Highlights the need to prohibit child labor to ensure sustained and equitable economic growth. Overseen by the Ministry of Planning and External Cooperation and the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

National Action Strategy for Education for All (2011–2018)

Aims to increase access to quality primary education, particularly for vulnerable populations, by subsidizing school fees for both public and private schools. The strategy is overseen by the Ministry of Education and supported by international donors. As of 2017, has provided free tuition-fee waivers to nearly 437,905 children.

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, human trafficking

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

1.1 Définitions
Au sens de la présente Loi :
1.1.6 Le terme « victime » désigne toute personne physique qui est soumise à la traite des personnes telle que définie dans la présente loi.
1.1.7 L ’ expression « victime vulnérable » désigne une personne présentant une particulière vulnérabilité tenant à son âge mineur ou avancé, sa condition physique ou mentale déficiente, ou qui est particulièrement exposée à des comportements criminels.

CHAPITRE I
DU COMITÉ NATIONAL DE LUTTE CONTRE LA TRAITE DES PERSONNES
Un organisme interministériel et sectoriel dénommé « Comité National de Lutte contre la Traite des Personnes », ci-après le Comité, est créé. Le Comité a pour mission de coordonner les activités de lutte contre la traite, de prévenir, de combattre la traite sous toutes ses formes et de garantir la protection des victimes. Il est rattaché au Ministère des Affaires Sociales et du Travail.

CHAPITRE II
PROTECTION ET ASSISTANCE AUX VICTIMES ET TÉMOINS DE LA TRAITE DES PERSONNES
La présente loi protège la vie privée et l’identité des victimes et des témoins de la traite des personnes afin de les préserver de toutes représailles, persécutions et/ou intimidations. A cette fin, un système de protection des témoins et des victimes, prenant en compte l’état des personnes vulnérables, particulièrement, les victimes vulnérables telles que, les enfants et les femmes, doit être mis en place.
Ainsi, toutes les mesures prises en rapport avec des enfants victimes et témoins doivent s’appuyer sur les principes énoncés dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant et les lignes directrices en matière de justice dont la primauté de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant et la prise en compte de son opinion pour toute mesure le concernant.
A cet effet, les mesures ci-après décrites doivent être observées tout au long de la procédure. Elles devront, dans certains cas, se poursuivre au-delà de la phase du jugement.
Section 1 : Protection et assistance aux victimes
Section 2 : Assistance spéciale aux enfants
Section 3 : Protection spéciale des témoins

Article 22.-
22.2.- Les personnes victimes de la traite sont exemptées de toutes poursuites pour des actes illicites liés à la traite, commis pendant qu’elles étaient sous l’empire de la contrainte des véritables auteurs des infractions prévues par la présente Loi.
22.3.- Les personnes victimes de la traite qui auraient commis un homicide dans les mêmes conditions qu’à l’alinéa précédent peuvent bénéficier de circonstances atténuantes.

Policies for assistance, general

Décret du 28 mai 1990 créant le Fonds d’assistance économique et sociale.

“A pour mission de financer des projets de courte durée et à haute intensité de main d’oeuvre visant à améliorer les conditions de vie des populations démunies dans les zones urbaines et rurales et à accroitre leur potentiel productif.”

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Code du travail, 1984

Article 340. Tout patron ou chef d’établissement qui engagera dans son entreprise un mineur non muni de son certificat ou permis d’emploi encourra une amende de 3 000 à 5 000 gourdes pour chaque infraction, à prononcer par le tribunal du travail, sur requête de la Direction du travail.

Loi du 11 septembre 2017 portant organisation et réglementation du travail sur la durée de vingt-quatre (24) heures, répartie en trois (3) tranches de huit (8) heures

Article 10.-Est illégal et punissable conformément à l’article 340 du Code du Travail, le fait de faire travailler des enfants et des adolescents de moins de seize (16) ans. Cette peine est doublée si ce travail est effectué durant la nuit.

Penalties, human trafficking

Loi sur la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2014

Article 11. Toute personne reconnue coupable de la traite des personnes telle que définie à l’article 1.1 commet un crime et est passible de sept (7) à quinze (15) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de deux cent mille gourdes (Gdes 200,000) à un million cinq cent mille gourdes (Gdes 1,500.000).

Article 12. Toute personne qui obtient ou tente d’ obtenir des services sexuels d’ autrui sachant que cette dernière est une victime de la traite commet un crime passible de la réclusion et du paiement d’une amende de cinquante mille (50,000) à cent mille gourdes (Gdes 100,000).

Article 13.-Toute personne qui, agissant ou prétendant agir en tant qu’ employeur d’ une autre personne, directeur, entrepreneur ou agent d’emploi, retient intentionnellement le document d’identification ou le passeport d’une personne aux fins de commission d’une des infractions liées à la traite des personnes commet un crime passible d’un emprisonnement de sept (7) à quinze (15) ans et d’une amende de deux cent mille gourdes (Gdes 200,000) à un million cinq cent mille gourdes (Gdes 1,500.000).

Article 14.-Le fait pour toute personne physique ou morale de s’adonner aux activités de blanchiment des avoirs ou du produit de la traite des personnes, est considéré au regard de la présente Loi comme une infraction qui, selon les circonstances définies ci-après, doit être qualifiée de crime et passible d’une des peines prévues à cet effet.
14.1 Il est en conséquence interdit à toute personne physique, entreprise ou société de capitaux de participer à l’un des actes suivants :

a) La conversion ou le transfert de biens, qu’elle sait être le produit de la traite des personnes, dans le but de dissimuler ou de déguiser l’origine illicite desdits biens ou d’aider toute personne impliquée dans la commission de l’infraction principale ou à échapper aux conséquences juridiques de ses actes.
b) La dissimulation ou le déguisement de la nature véritable, de l’origine, de l’emplacement, de la disposition, du mouvement ou de la propriété de biens ou de droits y relatifs dont l’auteur sait qu’ils sont le produit des crimes visés par la présente Loi.
c) L ’ acquisition, la détention ou l’ utilisation de biens dont celui qui les acquiert, les détient ou les utilise, sait au moment où il les reçoit, qu’ils proviennent de crimes liés à la traite des personnes.

Article 16.- La tentative de la commission d’une des infractions prévues aux articles 11, 12 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 27, 28 et 29 est punie d’une peine de trois (3) à huit (8) ans d’emprisonnement et, le cas échéant, d’une amende de cinquante mille gourdes (Gdes 50,000) à deux cent mille gourdes (Gdes 200,000).

Article 17.-L ’ association ou l’ entente en vue de commettre l’ une ou plusieurs des infractions visées aux articles 11, 12, 13, 14, 20, 28 et 29 est punie des peines prévues pour l’infraction la plus sévèrement réprimée.

Article 18.-La complicité par fourniture, en connaissance de cause, de moyens, d’une assistance, d’une aide en vue de commettre l’une des infractions visées dans la présente loi est punie des peines prévues pour la commission de l’infraction.

Article 19.- La récidive de l’une des infractions liées à la traite des personnes et prévues par la présente loi est punie de travaux forcés à perpétuité.

Article 20.-Toute personne qui, sciemment, aura recelé, en tout ou en partie, des choses, objets et biens enlevés, détournés ou obtenus à l’aide d’un crime relatif à la traite des personnes, est punie comme complice du crime de la traite des personnes.

Article 21.-
Les infractions prévues aux articles 11, 13,14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 et 20 sont punies de la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité lorsqu’elles sont commises dans les circonstances suivantes :

a) A l’ égard d’ un enfant ;
b) A l’ égard de plusieurs personnes;
c) Lorsque la victime a été violée ou a subi une atteinte analogue pendant la période de soumission à la traite, que ce soit par une ou plusieurs personnes;
d) A l’égard d’une personne qui se trouvait hors du territoire de la République et qui y a été introduite à cette fin ou lors de son arrivée sur le territoire de la République ;
e) A l’ égard d’ une personne particulièrement vulnérable en raison de son âge, d’ une infirmité, d’une déficience physique ou psychique ou de son état de grossesse, ou de tout autre cas similaire apparent ou connu de son auteur ;
f) Lorsque la personne a été mise en contact avec l’auteur des faits grâce à l’utilisation d’un réseau de diffusion de messages à destination du public ;
g) Par enlèvement, avec l’emploi de menaces, de contraintes, de violences ou de manœuvres dolosives visant l’intéressé(e), sa famille ou une personne étant en relation habituelle avec lui/elle ;
h) Dans des circonstances qui exposent directement la victime à l’égard de laquelle l’infraction est commise à un risque, immédiat ou non, de mort ou de blessure de nature à entraîner une mutilation ou une infirmité permanente, ou de maladie durable ;
i)Par un ascendant légitime, naturel ou adoptif de la personne victime de la traite ou par une personne ayant autorité sur elle, ou par une personne qui a abusé de l’autorité ou des facilités que lui confèrent ses fonctions ;
j) Par un officier ou un fonctionnaire public, un dépositaire ou un agent de la puissance ou de la force publique, ou toute personne utilisant des prérogatives liées à ses fonctions ;
k) Par une personne qui aura fabriqué de fausses pièces d’identité, de faux titres, de faux passeports pour le passage des victimes de la traite sur un territoire étranger ou leur introduction sur le territoire haïtien.

21.1.-Les infractions prévues aux articles 11, 12, 29 et 33 commises par plusieurs personnes ou en bande organisée et en recourant à des tortures et à des actes de barbarie sont punies de la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité.

Article 22.-
Les personnes impliquées à titre de complice ou ayant participé à la préparation des infractions visées par la présente loi et qui ont permis ou facilité l’identification ou l’arrestation des auteurs, au premier chef, desdites infractions, voient leur peine réduite de moitié, calculée en tenant compte du minimum de temps prévu pour la sanction.
22.1.- La personne reconnue coupable de participation à une association ou à une entente visée à l’article 17 peut bénéficier d’une réduction de peine, si ayant révélé cette association ou cette entente à l’autorité administrative et/ou judiciaire, elle a permis de mettre fin à celle-ci et d’en arrêter les membres avant qu’ils n’agissent.

Article 23.-Si une infraction prévue par la présente loi a été commise par une personne morale et si la preuve est faite qu’elle l’a été avec son consentement ou sa connivence, ou est attribuable à la négligence d’une personne occupant les fonctions d’administrateur, directeur, secrétaire ou de tout autre dirigeant de la personne morale ou d’une personne qui était censée agir à l’un de ces titres, la personne morale est coupable d’une infraction et passible de poursuites, sans préjudice de la responsabilité pénale des personnes physiques qui ont commis les infractions.

Article 24.-S’il est présumé qu’un établissement est sciemment impliqué ou associé à la commission d’infractions liées à la traite des personnes ou de tout autre acte criminel prévu par les termes de la présente loi, le juge d’instruction peut, sur la réquisition du Ministère public, ordonner la mise sous séquestre d’un tel établissement à la diligence du Juge de Paix territorialement compétent.
24.1 L ’ établissement ayant facilité la commission d’ une infraction prévue par la présente loi, peut être confisqué au profit de l’Etat par le tribunal compétent, en conformité avec les lois applicables en la matière pour chaque cas.
24.2 Les profits provenant de la vente des biens confisqués conformément à l’article 23 peuvent être utilisés pour contribuer au fonds spécial créé pour lutter contre la traite des personnes.

Article 25.-Dans les cas prévus par les articles 23 et 24, les tribunaux prononcent la fermeture définitive de tout établissement ouvert au public, si ces infractions ont été commises par l’exploitant ou avec sa complicité.
Le retrait de l’autorisation de fonctionnement ou de la licence d’exploitation peut être aussi prononcé de façon définitive, à la diligence des autorités compétentes.
25.1 Dans les cas prévus par les articles 11, 13, 14, 14.1, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 et 21, les tribunaux peuvent prononcer :

1) L’interdiction définitive de séjourner sur le territoire haïtien de tout étranger coupable d’une des infractions sur la traite des personnes.
2) La confiscation au profit du fonds spécial de lutte contre la traite des personnes, prévu à l’article 7, de tout ou partie des biens de la personne condamnée, qu’ils soient en nature (meubles, immeubles), en numéraire ou en actif.

Penalties, General

Code du travail, 1984

Article 513. La violation d’une prescription quelconque du Code du travail habilite la Direction du travail à saisir le tribunal du travail par requête en vue de la condamnation du contrevenant à l’amende. Il sera remis avec la requête le procès- verbal de l’inspecteur du travail ou toute pièce établissant cette violation. Si l’amende n’est pas prévue, elle sera de 5000 gourdes.

Article 514. Toutes les fois que l’amende est prononcée par le tribunal du travail, elle sera perçue à la diligence de la Direction du travail qui, le cas échéant, agira par voie de contrainte administrative et fera verser le montant de l’amende au Trésor public contre récépissé.

Article 515. Dans tous les cas de récidive, le montant de l’amende prononcée par le tribunal du travail sera le double de celle prévue.

Article 516. Le présent décret abroge toutes lois ou dispositions de lois, tous décrets ou dispositions de décrets, tous décrets-lois ou dispositions de décrets-lois qui lui sont contraires et sera exécuté à la diligence du ministre d’État des Affaires sociales.

Article 310. Tout étranger qui exercera un métier ou une profession sans être muni du permis de travail obligatoire et tout employeur qui utilisera les services d’un travailleur étranger non muni du permis d’emploi ou dans un emploi ou un établissement autre que celui mentionné dans le permis d’emploi seront punis d’une amende de 5 000 à 10 000 gourdes à prononcer par le tribunal de travail sur requête de la Direction du travail.
En cas de récidive, la peine sera doublée et le tribunal de travail pourra requérir le retrait du permis de séjour du travailleur étranger.

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Haiti. If you are a representative of Haiti and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.