Data Dashboards

Honduras
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2001 and 2014 increased by 22%.

+22%

2000- 2015

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.623 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.6 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 40.5% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 10.7% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2008
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 7.5% (2012)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: 15.4% (2016)

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Honduras, the percentage of child labourers has increased overall from 2001 to 2014.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Honduras, the latest estimates show that 5.7 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The number is the same as in 2013, but has increased from 2.5 percent in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Honduras, the latest estimates show that 24.5 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The percentage is higher than in 2013, but is the same percent as in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2014 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Honduras was 22.1 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 23.6 hours in 2013.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2014, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 33.2 hours per week. This number has increased since 2013, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 30.9. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 14.0 hours per week according to the 2002 estimate. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2002. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Honduras is from 2014. By the 2014 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Manufacturing sector, the Other Services sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Honduras.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Honduras.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Honduras between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Honduras is 0.623. This score indicates that human development is medium. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Honduras over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Honduras showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Honduras.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Explotación Laboral Ilícita

Código Penal, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 292.- EXPLOTACIÓN LABORAL ILÍCITA.
Quien mediante engaño o abuso de situación de necesidad perjudica, suprime o restringe los derechos que los trabajadores tengan legalmente reconocidos en el empleo público o privado, debe ser castigado con la pena de prisión de uno (1) a tres (3) años y multa de cien (100) a trescientos (300) días.
Las penas se deben aumentar en un cuarto (1/4) cuando se haya empleado violencia o intimidación.”

Child Labour

Código del Trabajo, 1959

“Trabajadores menores de edad
Art. 32. Los menores de catorce (14) años y los que habiendo cumplido esa edad, sigan sometidos a la enseñanza en virtud de la legislación nacional, no podrán ser ocupados en ninguna clase de trabajo.
Las autoridades encargadas de vigilar el trabajo de estos menores podrán autorizar su ocupación cuando lo consideren indispensable para la subsistencia de los mismos, o de sus padres o hermanos, y siempre que ello no impida cumplir con el mínimo de instrucción obligatoria.”

Constitución Política de la República de Honduras, 1982

“Artículo 128. Las leyes que rigen las relaciones entre patronos y trabajadores son de orden público. Son nulos los actos, estipulaciones o convenciones que impliquen renuncia, disminuyan, restrinjan o tergiversen las siguientes garantías:
7. Los menores de (16) diez y seis años y los que hayan cumplido esa edad y sigan sometidos a la enseñanza en virtud de la legislación nacional, no podrán ser ocupados en trabajo alguno:
No obstante, las autoridades de trabajo podrán autorizar su ocupación cuando lo consideren indispensable para la subsistencia de los mismos, de sus padres o de sus hermanos y siempre que ello no impida cumplir con la educación obligatoria;
Para los menores de diecisiete (17) años la jornada de trabajo que deberá ser diurna, no podrá exceder de seis (6) horas diarias ni de (30) treinta a la semana, en cualquier clase de trabajo;”

Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia Decreto 76, 1996 amend. Decreto 35, 2013

“ARTÍCULO 1.- Para todos los efectos de este Código, se entenderá por niño o niña a todas las personas hasta los dieciocho (18) años de edad.
Las disposiciones contenidas en este Código son de orden público y los derechos que establecen en favor de los niños y niñas son irrenunciables, intransigibles y de aplicación obligatoria en todo acto, decisión o medida administrativa, judicial o de cualquier naturaleza que se adopte respecto de las personas hasta los dieciocho (18) años de edad, las que para todos los efectos legales se considerarán como niños y niñas.
En caso de duda sobre la edad de un niño o niña, se presumirá mientras se establece su edad legal efectiva, que es menor de dieciocho (18) años”

“Artículo 120. Las autorizaciones para trabajar se concederán a título individual y deberán limitar la duración de las horas de trabajo y establecer las condiciones en que se prestarán los servicios.
En ningún caso se autorizará para trabajar a un niño menor de catorce (14) años.”

Acuerdo STSS-211-01, 2001

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 2013

“Artículo 122. Los niños no podrán desempeñar labores insalubres o peligrosas aún cuando sean realizadas como parte de un curso o programa educativo o formativo. La insalubridad o peligrosidad se determinará tomando como base lo dispuesto en este Código, en el Código de Trabajo y en los reglamentos que existan sobre la materia.
Tomando en cuenta lo anterior, los niños no podrán realizar labores que:

a) Impliquen permanecer en una posición estática prolongada o que deban prestarse en andamios cuya altura exceda de tres (3) metros.
b) Tengan que ver con sustancias tóxicas o nocivas para la salud.
c) Expongan al tráfico vehicular.
ch) Expongan a temperaturas anormales o deban realizarse en ambientes contaminados o con insuficiente ventilación.
d) Deban realizarse en túneles o subterráneos de minería o en sitios en los que confluyen agentes nocivos tales como contaminantes, desequilibrios térmicos, deficiencias de oxígeno a consecuencia de la oxidación o la gasificación.
e) Los expongan a ruidos que excedan ochenta (80) decibeles.
f) Impliquen la manipulación de sustancias radioactivas, pinturas luminiscentes, rayos X o impliquen la exposición a radiaciones ultravioletas o infrarrojas y a emisiones de radiofrecuencia.
g) Impliquen exposición a corrientes eléctricas de alto voltaje.
h) Exijan la inmersión en el mar.
i) Tengan que ver con basureros o con cualquier otro tipo de actividades en las que se generen agentes biológicos patógenos.
j) Impliquen El Manejo De Sustancias Explosivas, inflamables o cáusticas.
k) Sean propios de fogoneros en los buques, ferrocarriles u otros bienes o vehículos semejantes.
l) Sean propios de la pintura industrial y entrañen el empleo de albayalde o cerusa, de sulfato de plomo o de cualquier otro producto que contenga dichos elementos.
ll) Se relacionen con máquinas esmeriladoras, de afilado de herramientas, muelas abrasivas de alta velocidad o con ocupaciones similares.
m) Se relacionen con altos hornos, hornos de fundición de metales, fábrica de acero, talleres de laminación, trabajo de forja o en prensas pesadas.
n) Involucren manipular cargas pesadas.
ñ) Se relacionan con cambios de correas de transmisión, de aceite o engrase u otros trabajos próximos a transmisiones pesadas o de alta velocidad.
o) Se relacionen con cortadoras, laminadoras, tornos, fresadoras, troqueladoras y otras máquinas particularmente peligrosas.
p) Tengan relación con el vidrio o con el pulido y esmerilado en seco de vidrio o con operaciones de limpieza por chorro de arena o con locales de vidriado y grabado.
q) Impliquen soldadura de cualquier clase, cortes con oxígeno en tanques o lugares confinados o en andamios o molduras precalentadas.
r) Deban realizarse en lugares en los que se presentan altas temperaturas o humedad constante.
s) Se realizan en ambientes en los que se desprenden vapores o polvos tóxicos o que se relacionen con la producción de cemento.
t) Se realicen en la agricultura o en la agroindustria que impliquen alto riesgo para la salud.
u) Expongan a un notorio riesgo de insolación; y,
v) Señalen en forma específica los reglamentos que sobre la materia emita la Secretaría de Estado en los Despachos de Trabajo y Seguridad Social.

La mencionada Secretaría de Estado podrá autorizar a niños mayores de dieciséis (16) años y menores de dieciocho (18) para que puedan desempeñar alguna de las labores señaladas en este Artículo si se prueba a satisfacción de la misma que han concluido estudios técnicos en el Instituto Nacional de Formación Profesional o en un instituto técnico especializado dependiente de la Secretaría de Estado en el Despacho de Educación. Aquella entidad, en todo caso, verificará que los cargos puedan ser desempeñados sin peligro para la salud o la seguridad del niño.”

Artículo 123. Queda prohibido a los niños menores de dieciocho (18) años todo trabajo que afecte su moralidad. En especial les está prohibido el trabajo en casas de lenocinio y demás lugares de diversión donde se consuman bebidas alcohólicas. Es también prohibida su contratación para la reproducción de escenas pornográficas, muertes violentas, apología del delito u otras labores semejantes.

Acuerdo STSS-211-01, 2001

Acuerdo STSS-441-2016

Trata de personas

Código Penal, 2019

“SECCIÓN II
TRATA DE PERSONAS Y FORMAS DEGRADANTES DE EXPLOTACIÓN HUMANA
ARTÍCULO 219.- TRATA DE PERSONAS. Debe ser castigado con la pena de prisión de cinco (5) a ocho (8) años, quien empleando violencia, intimidación, engaño o, abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad de la víctima o mediante la entrega o recepción de pagos o beneficios para lograr el consentimiento de la persona que posea el control de la misma, la capta, transporta, traslada, acoge o recibe, dentro o fuera del territorio nacional, con cualquiera de las finalidades siguientes:

1) La explotación en condiciones de esclavitud, servidumbre, servicios o trabajos forzados, incluida la mendicidad y la obligación de realizar actividades delictivas;
2) La explotación sexual forzada;
3) Realizar matrimonio o unión de hecho servil o forzado;
4) Provocar un embarazo forzado;
5) La extracción de sus órganos o tejidos corporales, o de sus componentes derivados; o,
6) La experimentación para la aplicación de medicamentos, fármacos, sustancias o técnicas clínicas.

El consentimiento de la víctima es irrelevante cuando se ha recurrido a alguno de los medios indicados en el párrafo primero de este artículo.
Aún cuando no se recurra a ninguno de los medios indicados en el párrafo primero, se considera trata de personas cualquiera de las acciones indicadas cuando se lleva a cabo respecto de menores de dieciocho (18) años con cualquiera de los fines de explotación previstos.”

Esclavo

Código Penal, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 221.- EXPLOTACIÓN EN CONDICIONES DE ESCLAVITUD O SERVIDUMBRE. Quien, ejerciendo sobre otra persona un poder de disposición o control, le impone o la mantiene en un estado de sometimiento continuado, obligándola a realizar actos, trabajos o a prestar servicios, dentro o fuera del territorio nacional, debe ser castigado con las penas de prisión de seis (6) a nueve (9) años y multa de ciento cincuenta (150) a trescientos días (300) días.
La reducción a la condición de esclavo o siervo a efectos de este artículo, tiene lugar cuando la situación de sometimiento
se logra mediante violencia, intimidación, engaño o abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad de la víctima.
La pena de prisión debe ser aumentada de un tercio (1/3) a la mitad (1/2) cuando la víctima sea menor de dieciocho (18) años.”

 

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1957

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1958

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 1980 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Not signed

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Not signed

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Accession 2008

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Accession 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Accession 2002

National Action Plans, National Strategies

Roadmap for the Eradication of Child Labor in Honduras

Aims to improve the government’s response to child labor issues. Works at the national, regional, and sub-regional levels and addresses poverty, health education, and social development. Implemented by the STSS.

Strategic Plan to Prevent and Eliminate Child Labor (2016–2020)

Identifies lines of action for preventing and eliminating child labor, including by increasing child labor law enforcement, strengthening engagement with the private sector, developing procedures for inter-agency coordination, and developing social programs to support children removed from child labor. Implemented by the STSS and other executive and judicial branch agencies, as well as employers’, workers’, and other civil society organizations.

Strategic Plan to Combat Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking in Honduras (2016–2022)

Establishes national priorities to combat commercial sexual exploitation and human trafficking in four principal areas: prevention and awareness; investigation, prosecution, and punishment of violations; detection, assistance, and protection of victims; and coordination and cooperation.

First Public Policy and National Action Plan on Human Rights

Aims to implement the government’s national and international human rights commitments, including those addressing child and forced labor.

Alliance for Prosperity in the Northern Triangle

Aims to create economic growth, increase educational and vocational training opportunities for youth, and reduce violence in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, in part to decrease the number of unaccompanied minors who leave Honduras and other Central American countries for the United States and who are vulnerable to human trafficking. Signed by the presidents of each country in 2014.

U.S.–Honduras Labor Rights Monitoring and Action Plan (2015–2018)

Aims to improve the enforcement of labor laws, including laws related to child labor, by implementing legal and policy reforms, strengthening the STSS, enhancing enforcement activities, and increasing outreach efforts.

Plan Nacional Contra la Violencia Hacia la Mujer, 2014-2022

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, General

Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia Decreto 76, 1996 amend. Decreto 35, 2013

ARTÍCULO 140.- Los niños y niñas cuyos derechos son vulnerados, quedan sujetos(as) a las medidas de protección consagradas en el presente Título

Ley de Protección a testigos en el proceso penal, 2007

Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

CICESCT instruye funcionarios del INM para identificar víctimas de trata de personas, 2018

 

Penalties
Penalties, Labour Exploitation

Código Penal, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 292.- EXPLOTACIÓN LABORAL ILÍCITA.
Quien mediante engaño o abuso de situación de necesidad perjudica, suprime o restringe los derechos que los trabajadores tengan legalmente reconocidos en el empleo público o privado, debe ser castigado con la pena de prisión de uno (1) a tres (3) años y multa de cien (100) a trescientos (300) días.
Las penas se deben aumentar en un cuarto (1/4) cuando se haya empleado violencia o intimidación.”

Penalties, Child Labour

Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 2013

“Artículo 133. La Secretaría de Estado en los Despachos de Trabajo y Seguridad Social emitirá disposiciones reglamentarias sobre:

a) Las sanciones administrativas aplicables a las infracciones que se cometan durante el aprendizaje o la prestación de servicio por parte de los aprendices o trabajadores y los patronos.
b) La orientación que debe darse a los niños trabajadores, a sus padres o representantes legales y al patrono en relación con los derechos y deberes de aquellos, los horarios, permisos y prestaciones y las medidas sobre salud ocupacional; y,
c) La forma en que se hará la inspección del trabajo de los niños y, en general, sobre los demás asuntos relacionados con su trabajo.

Artículo 134. Incurrirán en el delito de explotación económica y serán sancionados con reclusión de tres (3) a cinco (5) años:

a) Quien haga trabajar a un niño durante jornadas extraordinarias o durante jornadas nocturnas.
b) Quien obligue a un niño a trabajar por un salario inferior al mínimo.c) Quien promueva, incite o haga que un niño realice actividades deshonestas tales como la prostitución, la pornografía, la obscenidad y la inmoralidad.”

“Artículo 135. Será causa de emancipación judicial que el padre o la madre inciten u obliguen a un hijo dedicarse a la mendicidad o a realizar cualquiera de los actos a que se refieren los literales y del Artículo anterior.
Artículo 136. Las corporaciones municipales y las organizaciones comunitarias y docentes cooperarán con la Secretaría de Estado en los Despachos de Trabajo y Seguridad Social en el cumplimiento de las obligaciones derivadas de este Código.
Artículo 137. Las sanciones administrativas de las infracciones cometidas contra lo dispuesto en este Capítulo serán aplicadas por la Secretaría de Estado en los Despachos de Trabajo y Seguridad Social. Tales sanciones no obstan para que se deduzcan las responsabilidades civiles y penales que correspondan.”

Código Penal, 2019

ARTÍCULO 293.-EXPLOTACIÓN LABORAL INFANTIL. Si las conductas descritas en los dos artículos anteriores se realizan sobre menores de dieciocho (18) años, los hechos deben ser castigados con las penas previstas en los respectivos casos incrementadas en un tercio (1/3) y si son menores de dieciséis (16) años con las penas incrementadas en dos tercios (2/3).

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Código Penal, 2019

“SECCIÓN II
TRATA DE PERSONAS Y FORMAS DEGRADANTES DE EXPLOTACIÓN HUMANA
ARTÍCULO 219.- TRATA DE PERSONAS. Debe ser castigado con la pena de prisión de cinco (5) a ocho (8) años, quien empleando violencia, intimidación, engaño o, abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad de la víctima o mediante la entrega o recepción de pagos o beneficios para lograr el consentimiento de la persona que posea el control de la misma, la capta, transporta, traslada, acoge o recibe, dentro o fuera del territorio nacional, con cualquiera de las finalidades siguientes:

1) La explotación en condiciones de esclavitud, servidumbre, servicios o trabajos forzados, incluida la mendicidad y la obligación de realizar actividades delictivas;
2) La explotación sexual forzada;
3) Realizar matrimonio o unión de hecho servil o forzado;
4) Provocar un embarazo forzado;
5) La extracción de sus órganos o tejidos corporales, o de sus componentes derivados; o,
6) La experimentación para la aplicación de medicamentos, fármacos, sustancias o técnicas clínicas.

El consentimiento de la víctima es irrelevante cuando se ha recurrido a alguno de los medios indicados en el párrafo primero de este artículo.
Aún cuando no se recurra a ninguno de los medios indicados en el párrafo primero, se considera trata de personas cualquiera de las acciones indicadas cuando se lleva a cabo respecto de menores de dieciocho (18) años con cualquiera de los fines de explotación previstos.”

“ARTÍCULO 220.- AGRAVANTES ESPECÍFICAS. Se debe incrementar la pena en un tercio (1/3) cuando concurra alguna de las circunstancias siguientes:

1) Se pone en peligro la vida, la integridad física o psíquica o la salud de la víctima;
2) La víctima es especialmente vulnerable por razón de la edad, enfermedad, discapacidad o es mujer embarazada; o,
3) El culpable pertenece a un grupo delictivo organizado.
Se debe imponer, además de la pena de prisión correspondiente, la inhabilitación absoluta por el doble de tiempo que dure la pena de prisión, a quienes realizan los hechos prevaliéndose de su condición de funcionario o empleado público.”

Penalties, Slavery

Código Penal, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 221.- EXPLOTACIÓN EN CONDICIONES DE ESCLAVITUD O SERVIDUMBRE. Quien, ejerciendo sobre otra persona un poder de disposición o control, le impone o la mantiene en un estado de sometimiento continuado, obligándola a realizar actos, trabajos o a prestar servicios, dentro o fuera del territorio nacional, debe ser castigado con las penas de prisión de seis (6) a nueve (9) años y multa de ciento cincuenta (150) a trescientos días (300) días.
La reducción a la condición de esclavo o siervo a efectos de este artículo, tiene lugar cuando la situación de sometimiento
se logra mediante violencia, intimidación, engaño o abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad de la víctima.
La pena de prisión debe ser aumentada de un tercio (1/3) a la mitad (1/2) cuando la víctima sea menor de dieciocho (18) años.”

Penalties, General

Código Penal, 2019

“ARTÍCULO 222.- EXPLOTACIÓN DE LA MENDICIDAD.
Quien utiliza a un menor de dieciocho (18) años, persona de avanzada edad o con discapacidad necesitada de especial protección en la práctica de la mendicidad, debe ser castigado con la pena de arresto domiciliario de un (1) mes a dos (2) años o prestación de servicios de utilidad pública o a las víctimas de doscientos (200) a cuatrocientos (400) días.
Cuando se haya empleado violencia o intimidación o se le suministre a la víctima sustancias perjudiciales para la salud u otras que tengan capacidad de debilitar su voluntad, la pena debe ser de prisión de dos (2) a tres (3) años, sin perjuicio de aplicar otro precepto del presente Código si en él se prevé mayor pena.”

“ARTÍCULO 208.- FEMINICIDIO. Comete delito de feminicidio el hombre que mata a una mujer en el marco de relaciones desiguales de poder entre hombres y mujeres basadas en el género.
El delito de feminicidio debe ser castigado con la pena de prisión de veinte (20) a veinticinco (25) años.
Comete delito de feminicidio agravado el hombre que mata a una mujer en el marco de relaciones desiguales de poder entre hombres y mujeres basadas en el género, la pena del feminicidio agravado, debe ser de prisión de veinticinco (25) a treinta (30) años, a no ser que corresponda mayor pena por la aplicación de otros preceptos del presente Código, cuando concurra alguna de las circunstancias siguientes:

1) Cualquiera de las contempladas en el delito de asesinato;
2) Que el culpable sea o haya sido cónyuge o persona con la que la víctima mantenga o haya mantenido una relación estable de análoga naturaleza a la anterior o ser ascendiente, descendiente, hermano de la agraviada o de su cónyuge o conviviente;
3) Que el feminicidio haya estado precedido por un acto contra la libertad sexual de la víctima;
4) Cuando el delito se comete por o en el contexto de un grupo delictivo organizado;
5) Cuando la víctima del delito sea una trabajadora sexual;
6) Cuando la víctima lo sea también de los delitos de trata de personas, esclavitud o servidumbre;
7) Cuando se hayan ocasionado lesiones o mutilaciones a la víctima o a su cadáver relacionadas con su condición de mujer; y,
8) Cuando el cuerpo de la víctima sea expuesto o exhibido por el culpable en lugar público.

El delito de feminicidio se castigará sin perjuicio de las penas que correspondan por los delitos cometidos contra la integridad moral, libertad ambulatoria, libertad sexual, trata de personas y formas degradantes de explotación humana o en el cadáver de la mujer o contra cualquiera de los bienes jurídicos protegidos en el presente Código.
Se aplican las penas respectivamente previstas en los delitos de feminicidio, cuando se dé muerte a una persona que haya salido en defensa de la víctima de este delito.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Honduras. If you are a representative of the Honduras and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.