Data Dashboards

Madagascar
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2001 and 2007 increased by 10%

+10%

2001- 2007

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.521 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.1 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 85.3% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 67.7% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2005
National Strategies

National Action Plan to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor (2004–2019)

National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Persons (2015–2019)

Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children in the Tourism Industry

National Social Protection Policy

National Development Plan (2015–2019)

Education Sector Plan (2018–2022)

UNDAF 2015-2019

ILO Decent Work Country Programme 2015-2019

Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 4.6% (2011)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Madagascar, the percentage of child labourers has increased overall from 2001 to 2007.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001 and 2007.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Madagascar, the latest estimates show that 20.0 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2007. The number is higher than in 2001, and has decreased from 7.9 percent in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001 and 2007. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Madagascar, the latest estimates show that 47.8 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2007. The percentage is higher than in 2001, and has increased from 26.8 percent in 2001. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001 and 2007.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2007 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Madagascar was 24.0 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 35.4 hours in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001 and 2007.

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2007, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 32.7 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2001, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 36.6. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001 and 2007.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 9.5 hours per week according to the 2007 estimate. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2007. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Madagascar is from 2007. By the 2007 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Other Services sector, the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Manufacturing sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Madagascar.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Madagascar.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Madagascar between 2000 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Madagascar is 0.521. This score indicates that human development is low. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Madagascar over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Madagascar showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Madagascar.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Travail forcé

Constitution de la IVe République, 2010

“Article 29.
Tout citoyen a droit à une juste rémunération de son travail lui assurant, ainsi qu’à sa famille, une existence conforme à la dignité humaine.”

Code du Travail, 2003

“Article 4.- Le travail forcé ou obligatoire est interdit. Le terme “”travail forcé ou obligatoire”” désigne tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de plein gré.
Les dispositions de l’alinéa précédent ne s’appliquent pas dans les cas énumérés ci-dessous :
Travaux, services, secours requis dans les circonstances d’accidents, naufrages, inondations, incendies ou autres calamités ainsi que dans les cas de brigandages, pillages, flagrants délits, clameurs publiques ou d’exécution judiciaire.
Travaux d’intérêt collectif exécutés en application d’une convention librement consentie par les membres du fokonolona ou dans le cadre de menus travaux de village et devenus exécutoires.
Travaux à caractère purement militaire lorsqu’ils sont exigés en vertu des dispositions législatives portant organisation de la défense nationale et travaux d’intérêt général réalisés volontairement dans le cadre du Service National.
Tout travail exigé d’un individu, comme conséquence d’une condamnation prononcée par une décision judiciaire, à la condition que ce travail ou service soit exécuté sous la surveillance et le contrôle des autorités publiques et qu’il soit destiné à des réalisations d’intérêt public. Cependant, sont interdites l’imposition de travail aux personnes se trouvant en détention préventive ainsi que la cession gratuite de main-d’œuvre carcérale à des particuliers, entreprises ou personnes morales privées, même si ceux-ci sont chargés de l’exécution de travaux publics.”

Travail des enfants

Code du Travail, 2003

“Article 100.- L’âge minimum légal d’accès à l’emploi est de quinze (15) ans sur toute l’étendue du territoire de Madagascar. Cet âge minimum ne doit pas être inférieur à l’âge auquel cesse la scolarité obligatoire.
Des Décrets pris après avis du Conseil National du Travail fixent la nature des travaux interdits aux enfants.”

Décret 2007-563 relatif au travail des enfants, 2007

“Article 2 : En application des dispositions de l’article 100 de la Loi N°2003-044 du 28 juillet 2004 portant Code du Travail, les enfants de 15 ans et plus peuvent être embauchés pour exécuter des travaux légers.
Sont considérés comme travaux légers :

– les travaux qui n’excédent pas leur force ;
– les travaux qui ne présentent pas des causes de danger ;
– les travaux qui ne sont pas susceptibles de nuire à leur santé ou à leur développement physique, mental, spirituel, moral ou social.”

Des pires formes de travail

Code du Travail, 2003

“Article 101.- Dans les établissements assujettis à la présente Loi, les enfants mineurs et les apprentis âgés de moins de dix huit (18) ans de l’un ou de l’autre sexe ne peuvent être employés à un travail effectif de plus de huit (08) heures par jour et de quarante (40) heures par semaine.
Le travail de nuit ainsi que les heures supplémentaires sont interdits aux enfants jusqu’à l’âge de dix huit (18) ans.
Un repos quotidien de douze (12) heures consécutives est obligatoire pour les enfants travailleurs.”

Loi 2014-040 sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, 2014

“Article premier.-
Le terme << enfant » désigne toute personne âgée de moins de 1B ans.”

Décret 2007-563 relatif au travail des enfants, 2007

“Article 3 : En application des dispositions de l’article 102 de la Loi N°2003-044 du 28 juillet 2004 portant Code du Travail, les enfants entre 14 et 15 ans peuvent être exceptionnellement autorisés par l’inspecteur du travail à exécuter des travaux légers, s’ils ont terminé leur scolarité obligatoire.
La délivrance de l’autorisation par l’Inspecteur du Travail est conditionnée par le résultat d’une enquête préalable du Service de l’Inspection du Travail sur les conditions de travail, l’hygiène et la sécurité du travail, l’environnement au travail, la protection, la santé et la scolarité de l’enfant et les circonstances locales dont les modalités de l’enquête seront fixées par l’arrêté du Ministre en charge du travail après avis du Comité National de la Lutte contre le Travail des Enfants (CNLTE).
L’autorisation de l’Inspecteur du Travail est délivrée à titre révocable.
Article 4 : Dans tous les cas, l’emploi des enfants de l’un ou de l’autre sexe est formellement interdit après 18 Heures.”

“CHAPITRE II
DES PIRES FORMES DE TRAVAIL
Article 10 : Au sens de la Convention Internationale du Travail N°182 relative à l’interdiction des pires formes du travail des enfants et conformément aux dispositions de la loi n°2003-044 du 28 juillet 2004 portant Code du travail, les enfants de moins de 18 ans de l’un ou de l’autre sexe ne peuvent être employés à des travaux immoraux, des travaux excédant leur force, des travaux forcés et des travaux dangereux ou insalubres.”

“Article 11 : Il est interdit d’employer les enfants aux travaux de caractère immoral notamment à la confection, à la manutention et à la vente d’écrits imprimés, affiches, dessins, gravures, peintures, emblèmes, images, film, disque compacte et autres objets dont la vente, l’offre, l’exposition, l’affichage ou la distribution sont réprimés par les lois pénales ou qui, sans tomber sous le coup de ces lois, sont contraires aux bonnes mœurs.
Il est également interdit d’employer les enfants dans les locaux où s’exécutent les travaux énumérés à l’alinéa précédent.

Article 12 : Il est prohibé d’employer les enfants dans les bars, les discothèques, les casinos, les maisons de jeux, les cabarets. Il en est de même des étalages extérieurs se trouvant à proximité des lieux susvisés ainsi que de tout autre lieu public où sont consommés des boissons alcoolisées.

Article 13 : Le recrutement, l’utilisation, l’offre et l’emploi des enfants de l’un ou l’autre sexe à des fins de prostitution, de production de matériel pornographique ou de spectacles pornographiques, l’exploitation sexuelle à des fins commerciales sont interdits.
Aux fins du présent article :

– le terme « recrutement, utilisation, exploitation, offre et emploi des enfants » désigne tout
acte faisant intervenir l’engagement d’un enfant à toutes activités sexuelles et le transfert de celui-ci à une autre personne ou à un autre groupe de personne contre rémunération ou promesse d’avantage de quelque nature que ce soit ;
– le terme « prostitution des enfants » ou « exploitation sexuelle à des fins commerciales » désigne toute utilisation d’un enfant aux fins d’activités sexuelles contre rémunération ou tout autre forme d’avantage ;
– le terme « pornographique mettant en scène des enfants » désigne toute représentation, par quelque moyen que ce soit, d’un enfant s’adonnant à des activités sexuelles explicites, réelles ou simulées, ou toute représentation des organes sexuels d’un enfant, à des fins principalement sexuelles.

Article 14 : Le recrutement, l’utilisation, l’offre et l’emploi des enfants de l’un ou de l’autre sexe à la production et au trafic de stupéfiants sont interdits.
On entend par « trafic de stupéfiants » toute offre, mise en vente, distribution, courtage, vente, livraison à quelque titre que ce soit, envoi, expédition, transport, achat, détention ou emploi de drogues.”

“Article 15 : Toutes les formes de travail forcé ou obligatoire notamment la vente et la traite des enfants, l’utilisation des enfants comme gage pour payer la dette de la famille, l’esclavage, le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire en vue de l’utilisation des enfants dans des conflits armées sont interdits.
Les enfants ne devraient en aucun cas faire l’objet d’un enrôlement obligatoire dans les forces armées.
Aux fins du présent article :

– le terme travail forcé ou obligatoire désigne tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de plein gré.
– sont considérés comme « traite des enfants » le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation.

Article 16 : L’emploi des enfants comme domestiques ou gens de maison est formellement interdit.”

“Article 17 : Les enfants ne peuvent être employés dans un chantier où l’on utilise des véhicules et engins mobiles ainsi que des appareils pouvant occasionner des accidents notamment :

– les appareils élévateurs tels les ascenseurs, les monte-charges, les grues
– les machines motrices et génératrices

Article 18 : Il est interdit d’employer les enfants aux machines ou mécanisme en marche susceptibles d’occasionner un accident notamment :

– des machines à coudre mues par des pédales ou par des moteurs électriques.
– des machines à battre, broyer, calandrer, couper et découper, écraser, hacher, laminer,
malaxer, mélanger, pétrir, presser, triturer, scier, trancher, meuler. Article 19 : Les enfants ne peuvent être employés :
– dans un endroit où l’on manipule des matières inflammables, des matières toxiques tels que les produits chimiques et les pesticides,
– dans un atelier destiné à la préparation, à la distillation ou à la manipulation des substances corrosives, vénéneuses et des celles qui dégagent des gaz délétères ou explosibles.
– dans un atelier où se dégagent des poussières nuisibles

Article 20 : Il est interdit d’employer les enfants à la cueillette des plantes toxiques ou à risques.

Article 21 : La même interdiction s’applique aux travaux dangereux, ou malsains tels que travaux en hauteur dans les bâtiments, travaux dans les abattoirs publics et privés d’animaux, travaux dans les établissements curatifs comme ceux comportant un danger de contagion ou d’infection, l’aiguisage ou le polissage à sec des objets en métal et des verres ou cristaux, le battage ou le grattage à sec des plombs carbonatés.

Article 22 : Les enfants ne peuvent être recrutés pour tous travaux d’exploitation des mines et des carrières.”

Traite des êtres humains

Loi 2014-040 sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, 2014

“Article premier.- Aux fins de la présente loi, I’expression « traite des êtres humains»» désigne le recrutement, le transport, l’hébergement ou I’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par I’offre ou I’acceptation de paiements ou avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre aux fins d’exploitation.
La traite couvre:

– l’exploitation de la prostitution d’une personne ou d’un groupe de personnes ;
– I’exploitation du travail domestique ;
– le travail forcé et des pratiques analogues à l’esclavage ;
– le mariage forcé ;
– la vente de personne ;
– I’adoption illégale ;
– la servitude pour dette civile ;
– l’exploitation de la mendicité d’autrui ;
– le trafic d’organe ;

La traite couvre également I’exploitation sexuelle des enfants à des fins commerciales.
Sont considérés également « traite des personnes »» le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’un enfant aux fins d’exploitation même sans emploi de I’un des moyens visés à l’alinéa 1 du présent article.”

Code Pénal, 1972 amend. 2007

“Art. 333 ter :
1. Un enfant s’entend de tout être humain âgé de moins de dix huit ans.
2. L’expression «traite ou trafic des personnes» désigne le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil de personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre aux fins d’exploitation ou d’adoption plénière illégale d’un enfant par une personne dite trafiquant.”

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1960

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 2007

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2000 (minimum age specified: 15 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Accession 1964

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1972

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2005

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1991

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2004

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2004

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Action Plan to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor (2004–2019)

Aims to eliminate the worst forms of child labor by strengthening child labor laws, conducting awareness-raising campaigns, mobilizing funds for social programs, and updating databases on child labor. Led by the CNLTE. In 2017, conducted workshops with civil society to improve child protection systems in the regions of Atsinanana and Atsimo-Andrefana, and implemented a nationwide media campaign to raise awareness of child labor.

National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Persons (2015–2019)

Seeks to enhance the legal framework to prevent human trafficking, effectively implement human trafficking laws, and provide protection and care for victims. Overseen by the National Bureau to Combat Human Trafficking. In 2017, provided training on anti‐trafficking legislation, enforcement techniques, and victim identification to law enforcement agencies and civil society groups. However, reports indicated that the government did not provide sufficient funding to implement the plan in 2017.

Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children in the Tourism Industry

Aims to prevent commercial sexual exploitation of children in the tourism industry. Implemented by the Ministry of Tourism and supported by the ILO and UNICEF. As of 2017, more than 1,000 tourism companies in 12 regions have signed the code of conduct, and eight regional action plans have been developed to implement the code.

National Social Protection Policy

Aims to protect children from abuse, violence, and exploitation and promotes improved access to education and livelihood services for vulnerable children. Led by the Ministry of Population, Social Protection and the Promotion of Women and supported by international donors. In 2017, the government adopted a law that establishes a common fund to leverage public and private funding for social protection programs, including cash transfer programs to increase education for children from vulnerable households.

National Development Plan (2015–2019)

Aims to promote sustainable development and social equality. Overseen by the Ministry of Economy and Planning and supported by the ILO’s Decent Work Country Program. Includes a budget of $83,000 to specifically combat commercial sexual exploitation of children and child labor in domestic work, mining, quarrying, and other hazardous sectors.

Education Sector Plan (2018–2022)†

Aims to expand access to education and improve the quality of education. Overseen by the Ministry of Education.

UNDAF 2015-2019

ILO Decent Work Country Programme 2015-2019

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, human trafficking

Loi 2014-040 sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, 2014

Titre V. De la protection des victimes, temoins, enqueteurs et de la reparation

Titre VI. De l’immigration et du retour

Code Pénal, 1972 amend. 2007

Art.335. 6 : L’enfant victime des infractions relatives à la traite, à l’exploitation sexuelle, au tourisme sexuel et à l’inceste peut, à tout moment, signaler ou saisir le Ministère Public ou toute autre autorité compétente des faits commis à son encontre et réclamer réparation du préjudice subi.

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Code du Travail, 2003

“Article 261.- Sera puni d’une amende de 1 tapitrisa Ariary ou 5.000.000 Fmg à 3 tapitrisa Ariary 15.000.000 Fmg et d’un emprisonnement de un (01) an à trois (03) ans ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement, tout traitement discriminatoire fondé sur la race, la religion, l’origine, le sexe, l’appartenance syndicale, l’appartenance et les opinions politiques du travailleur en ce qui concerne l’accès à l’emploi et à la formation professionnelle, les conditions de travail et d’avancement, les conditions de rémunération, le licenciement.
Seront punis des mêmes peines les auteurs d’infraction :
aux règles régissant le travail de nuit des femmes et la protection des femmes enceintes, prévues aux articles 83 et 84, alinéa 1, 3 et 4 ainsi qu’aux articles 93, 94, 95, 96, 97 alinéa 2, 3, 4 et 5 et 98 alinéa 2 de la présente Loi ;
aux règles protectrices des enfants prévues à l’article 32 ainsi qu’aux articles 100, 101, 102 et 103 alinéa 2 et 3 de la présente Loi ;
aux règles protectrices des personnes handicapées prévues aux articles 104 et 105 de la présente Loi.
En cas de récidive, les peines d’amende et d’emprisonnement seront portées au double.
Les auteurs des infractions aux dispositions de l’article 5 du présent Code du Travail sont sanctionnés par les dispositions du Code Pénal qui prévoient et répriment les actes de harcèlement sexuel ou tous autres actes de violence perpétrés contre le travailleur.”

Décret 2007-563 relatif au travail des enfants, 2007

“Article 23 : Les infractions aux dispositions du présent décret sont réprimées conformément aux dispositions de l’article 261 de la Loi n°2003 – 0 44 du 28 Juillet 2004 portant Code du Travail.
Article 24 : Les sanctions pénales prévues par le Code Pénal (art.332 à art.347) sont applicables aux infractions aux articles 11, 12 et 13”

Penalties, Forced Labour

Code du Travail, 2003

“SECTION 5
Fraudes, travailleurs étrangers clandestins
Article 262.- Seront punis d’une amende de 1 tapitrisa Ariary ou 5.000.000 Fmg à 4 tapitrisa Ariary ou 20.000.000 Fmg et d’un emprisonnement de un (01) an à trois (03) ans ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement :
toute personne qui, en violation de l’article 4, par menace, violence, tromperie, dol ou promesse, aura contraint ou tenté de contraindre un travailleur à s’embaucher contre son gré ou qui, par les mêmes moyens, aura tenté de l’empêcher ou l’aura empêché de s’embaucher ou de remplir les obligations imposées par son contrat ;
toute personne qui, en faisant usage d’un contrat fictif ou contenant des indications inexactes, s’est fait embaucher ou s’est substituée volontairement à un autre travailleur ;
tout employeur ou fondé de pouvoir ou préposé qui aura porté sciemment sur le registre d’employeur ou tout autre document, des attestations mensongères relatives à la durée et aux conditions de travail accompli par le travailleur, ainsi que tout travailleur qui aura fait sciemment usage de ces attestations ;
toute personne qui aura exigé ou accepté du travailleur une rémunération quelconque à titre d’intermédiaire dans le règlement ou le paiement des salaires, indemnités, allocations et frais de toutes natures.
Sera puni des mêmes peines, quiconque aura été impliqué dans des opérations d’émigration clandestine des travailleurs malgaches à l’extérieur du territoire en infraction aux dispositions de l’article 43.
Sera également punie des mêmes peines, toute personne qui aura fait travailler sur le territoire de Madagascar des étrangers n’ayant pas obtenu l’autorisation préalable du Ministre du Travail ainsi que tout étranger ayant accepté de travailler sur le territoire de Madagascar sans ladite autorisation préalable.”

Penalties, Human trafficking

Loi 2014-040 sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains, 2014

“Art.S.- Le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’une personne, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ou d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre, aux fins d’exploitation de la prostitution d’une personne ou du travail domestique d’autrui sera puni d’une peine allant de 2 à 5 ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 1’000.000 Ar à 10.000.000 Ar.
Est également applicable la peine ci-dessus si l’auteur(e) des infractions visées à l’alinéa 1″”‘du présent article sur l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui est le/la conjoint(e)ou le /la concubin(e) ou parent de la victime ou ministre de culte, personnel de santé, enseignant(e) ou une personne détentrice d’autorité ou investie d’un mandat électif.”

“Art.6.- Le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’une personne, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité, ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ou d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre, aux fins d’exploitation du travail domestique d’autrui sera puni d’une peine allant de 2 à 5 ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 1 ,000.000 Ar à 10.000.000 Ar.

Art.7.- La peine applicable est de 5 à 10 ans de réclusion lorsque les infractions visées aux articles 5 et 6 ont été commises par un groupe criminel organisé ou dans le cadre d’une traite transnationale.
Les peines de travaux forcés à perpétuité sont applicables lorsque ces infractions ont entraîné la mort.”

Art.8.- La contrainte imposée à une personne, par la menace ou la violence, à effectuer un travail sans rétribution ou en échange d’une rétribution manifestement sans rapport avec l’importance du travail accompli constitue une infraction de traite passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de 2 à 5 ans et d’une amende de 1.000.000 à 5.000’000 Ar’

“Art.9.- La soumission à des conditions de travail ou d’hébergement incompatibles à la dignité humaine d’une personne dont la vulnérabilité ou l’état de dépendance sont apparents ou connus de l’auteur, constitue une infraction de traite passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de 2 à 5 ans et d’une amende de 1.000.000 à 5.000.000 Ar.
L’infraction est passible de travaux forcés à temps, si elle est commise à l’encontre d’un groupe de personnes ou d’une victime de déficience physique ou mentale, ou a causé une maladie grave et/ou invalidante.
La peine applicable est de 5 à 10 ans de réclusion lorsque l’infraction a été commise par un groupe criminel organisé ou dans le cadre d’une traite transnationale.
Les peines de travaux forcés à perpétuité sont encourues si l’infraction a entraîné la mort.”

“Art.12.- Le fait d’effectuer un acte ou toute transaction faisant intervenir le transfert de toute personne à une autre personne contre rémunération ou tout autre avantage constitue une infraction passible d’un emprisonnement de 5 ans à 10 ans et d’une amende de 4 000 000 à 20 000 000 Ar.
Les peines de travaux forcés à perpétuité sont encourues si l’infraction a entraîné la mort.”

“Chaptire V. De la servitude pour dette civile
Chapitre VI. De l’exploitation de la mendicite d’autrui”

Chapitre VIII: de l’atteinte contre les personnes vulnerables

Code Pénal, 1972 amend. 2007

“Art. 333 quater : La traite de personnes, y compris des enfants ainsi que le tourisme sexuel et l’inceste constituent des infractions.
Est considéré comme trafiquant d’enfants :

1. Quiconque recrute un enfant, le transporte, le transfère, l’héberge ou l’accueille en échange
d’une rémunération ou de tout autre avantage ou d’une promesse de rémunération ou d’avantage, pour le mettre à la disposition d’un tiers, même non identifié, afin de permettre la commission contre cet enfant des infractions de proxénétisme prévues et réprimées par les articles 334 et suivants, d’agressions ou d’atteintes sexuelles, d’exploitation de la mendicité, de conditions de travail ou d’hébergement contraires à sa dignité, même s’ils ne font appel à aucun des moyens énoncés à l’article 333 ter ;
2. Quiconque procède au transport illégal et à la vente d’enfants sous quelque forme que ce soit et à quelque fin que ce soit, notamment l’exploitation sexuelle, le travail forcé, l’esclavage, les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage et à la servitude, avec ou sans le consentement de la victime ;
3. Quiconque, sachant pertinemment l’existence de proxénétisme, d’exploitation sexuelle ou de tourisme sexuel, n’aura pas dénoncé ou signalé les faits aux autorités compétentes, conformément aux dispositions des articles 69 et 70 de la loi n°2007-023 du 20 août 2007 sur les droits et la protection des enfants, est considéré comme complice.
Les actes de participation sont considérés comme des infractions distinctes.”

“Art. 334 ter : Quiconque embauche, entraîne ou détourne en vue de la prostitution, une personne même consentante est punie de la peine de deux (2) à cinq (5) ans et d’une amende de 1 000 000 Ar à 10 000 000 Ar.
Si l’infraction a été commise sur la personne d’un enfant, de l’un ou de l’autre sexe, au dessous de l’âge de quinze ans, l’auteur est puni des travaux forcés à temps.
Art. 334 quater : L’exploitation sexuelle, définie par l’article 333 ter, est punie de la peine de cinq (5) à dix (10) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 4 000 000 Ar à 20 000 000 Ar.
L’exploitation sexuelle est punie des travaux forcés à temps si elle a été commise sur la personne d’un enfant, de l’un ou de l’autre sexe, au dessous de l’âge de quinze ans accomplis.
Si l’exploitation sexuelle a été commise à des fins commerciales sur un enfant de dix huit ans, l’auteur est puni des travaux forcés à temps.
Art. 334 quinto : Quiconque aura consommé des rapports sexuels avec un enfant contre toute forme de rémunération ou tout autre avantage est puni de la peine d’emprisonnement de deux (2) à cinq (5) ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 1 000 000 à 10 000 000 Ar. ou l’une de ces deux peines seulement.
La tentative est punie des mêmes peines. »”

Code Pénal, 1972

“Art. 333 (Ord. n°62-013 du 10.08.62)- Si les coupables sont les ascendants de la personne sur laquelle a été commis l’attentat, s’ils sont de la classe de ceux qui ont autorité sur elle, s’ils sont ses instituteurs ou ses serviteurs à gages, ou serviteurs à gages des personnes ci-dessus désignées, s’ils sont fonctionnaires ou ministres d’un culte, ou si le coupable, quel qu’il soit, a été aidé dans son crime par une ou plusieurs personnes, la peine sera celle des travaux forcés à perpétuité dans le cas prévu à l’alinéa premier de l’article 332, celle des travaux forcés à temps dans le cas prévus à l’alinéa premier de l’article 331, à l’alinéa 3 de l’article 332, celle de cinq à dix ans d’emprisonnement, dans les cas prévus aux alinéas 3 de l’article 331 et 4 de l’article 332.
Art. 333 bis (Loi n° 2000-021 du 30.11 00) – Quiconque aura subordonné l’accomplissement d’un service ou d’un acte relevant de sa fonction à l’obtention de faveurs de nature sexuelle ou qui exige à une personne des faveurs de même nature avant de lui faire obtenir, soit pour elle même, soit pour autrui un emploi, une promotion, une récompense, une décoration, un avantage quelconque ou une décision favorable sera puni d’un emprisonnment de un à trois ans et d’une amende de 1 000 000 Ariary à 4 000 000 Ariary.
Quiconque aura usé de menace de sanctions, de sanctions effectives ou de pressions graves pour amener une personne placée sous son autorité à lui consentir des faveurs de nature sexuelle ou pour se venger de celle qui lui aura refusé de telles faveurs sera puni de deux à cinq ans d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 2 000 000 Ariary à 10 000 000 Ariary.”

“Art. 334 (Loi n°98-024 du 25.01.99) – Sera considéré comme proxénète et puni d’un emprisonnement de deux ans à cinq ans et d’une amende de 1 000 000 Ariary à 10 000 000 Ariary, sans préjudice de peines plus fortes, s’il y a lieu, celui ou celle :

1° Qui, d’une manière quelconque, aide, assiste ou protège sciemment la prostitution d’autrui ou le racolage en vue de la prostitution ;
2° Qui, sous une forme quelconque, partage les produits de la prostitution d’autrui ou reçoit des subsides d’une personne se livrant habituellement à la prostitution ;
3° Qui, vivant sciemment, avec une personne se livrant habituellement à la prostitution, ne peut justifier de ressources suffisantes pour lui permettre de subvenir seul à sa propre existence ;
4° Qui embauche, entraîne, ou entretient, même avec son consentement, une personne même majeure en vue de la prostitution, ou la livre à la prostitution ou à la débauche ;
5° Qui fait office d’intermédiaire, à un titre quelconque, entre les personnes se livrant à la prostitution ou à la débauche et les individus qui exploitent ou rémunèrent la prostitution ou la débauche d’autrui.
6° (Loi n°98-024 du 25.01.99 ) – Qui facilite à un proxénète la justification de ressources fictives.
7° (Loi n°98-024 du 25.01.99) – Qui entrave l’action de prévention, de contrôle, d’assistance ou de rééducation entreprise par les organismes qualifiés à l’égard de personnes en danger de prostitution ou se livrant à la prostitution.”

“Art. 334 bis (Loi n°98-024 du 25.01.99) – La peine sera d’un emprisonnement de cinq ans à dix ans et d’une amende de 4 000 000 Ariary à 20 000 000 Ariary dans le cas où :

1° Le délit a été commis à l’égard d’un mineur ;
2° Le délit a été accompagné de contrainte, d’abus d’autorité ou de dol ;
3° L’auteur du délit était porteur d’une arme apparente ou cachée ;
4° L’auteur du délit est époux, père, mère ou tuteur de la victime ou appartient à l’une des catégories énumérées par l’article 333 ;
5° L’auteur du délit est appelé, de par ses fonctions, à la lutte contre la prostitution, à la protection de la santé ou au maintien de l’ordre public ;
6° Le délit a été commis à l’égard d’une personne dont la particulière vulnérabilité, due à son âge, à une maladie, à une infirmité, à une déficience physique ou psychique ou à un état de grossesse, apparente ou connue de son auteur ;
7° Le délit a été commis à l’égard de plusieurs personnes ;
8° Le délit a été commis à l’égard d’une personne qui a été incitée à se livrer à la prostitution, soit hors du territoire de la République, soit à son arrivée sur le territoire de la République ;
9° Le délit a été commis par plusieurs personnes agissant en qualité d’auteur ou de complice, sans qu’elles constituent une bande organisée.

(Ord. n°60-161 du 03.10.60) – Sous réserve des peines plus fortes prévues par cet article ou par les dispositions réprimant le racolage public, sera puni des peines portées au premier paragraphe, quiconque aura attenté aux mœurs soit en excitant, favorisant ou facilitant habituellement la débauche ou la corruption de la jeunesse de l’un ou l’autre sexe au-dessous de l’âge de vingt-et-un ans, ou même occasionnellement, des mineurs de seize ans.
(Ord. n°60-161 du 03.10.60) – Les peines prévues à l’article 334 et au présent article seront prononcées, alors même que les divers actes qui sont les éléments constitutifs des infractions auraient été accomplis dans des pays différents.”

“Art. 335 (Ord. n°60-161 du 03.10.60) – Sera puni des peines prévues à l’article précédent tout individu qui détient, directement ou par personne interposée, qui gère, dirige ou fait fonctionner un établissement de prostitution ou qui tolère habituellement la présence d’une ou plusieurs personnes se livrant à la prostitution à l’intérieur d’un hôtel, maison meublée, pension, débit de boissons, club, cercle, dancing ou lieu de spectacle ou leurs annexes, ou lieu quelconque ouvert au public ou utilisé par le public et dont il est le détenteur, le gérant ou le préposé. Les mêmes peines sont applicables à toute personne qui assiste lesdits détenteurs, gérants ou préposés. En cas de nouvelle infraction dans un délai de dix ans, les peines encourues seront portées au double.
Dans tous les cas où les faits incriminés se seront produits dans un établissement visé à l’alinéa précédent, et dont le détenteur, le gérant ou le préposé est condamné par application
de l’article précédent ou du présent article, le jugement portera retrait de la licence dont le condamné serait bénéficiaire et pourra, en outre, prononcer la fermeture définitive de l’établissement.
Les coupables d’un des délits ou de la tentative d’un des délits mentionnés aux articles 334 et 334 bis et au présent article seront, pendant deux ans au moins et vingt ans au plus, à compter du jour où ils auront subi leur peine, privés des droits énumérés en l’article 42 et interdits de toute tutelle ou curatelle.
Dans tous les cas, les coupables seront, en outre, mis, par l’arrêt ou le jugement, en état d’interdiction de séjour pendant deux à cinq ans.
La tentative des délits visés aux articles 334, 334 bis et au présent article sera punie des peines prévues pour ces délits.”

“Art. 335 bis (Loi n°98-024 du 25.01.99) – Le proxénétisme est puni de travaux forcés à temps et de 4 000 000 Ariary à 40 000 000 Ariary d’amende lorsqu’il est commis en bande organisée.
Il est puni des travaux forcés à perpétuité lorsqu’il est commis en recourant à des tortures ou à des actes de barbarie.”

“Art.335 ter : Les nationaux et les personnes ayant leur résidence habituelle à Madagascar qui se livrent à la traite, à l’exploitation sexuelle, au tourisme sexuel dans d’autres pays sont poursuivis et sanctionnés conformément aux dispositions du Code Pénal.
Art. 335 quater : Les demandes d’extradition des personnes recherchées aux fins de procédure dans un État étranger sont exécutées pour les infractions prévues à la présente loi ou aux fins de faire exécuter une peine relative à une telle infraction.
Les procédures et les principes prévus par le traité d’extradition en vigueur entre l’État requérant et Madagascar sont appliqués.
En l’absence de traité d’extradition ou de dispositions législatives, l’extradition est exécutée selon la procédure et dans le respect des principes définis par le traité type d’extradition adopté par l’Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies dans sa Résolution 45/116.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled