Datos de los paneles

Mauritius
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Due to lack of nationally representative data, there is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

No data available

Data Availability
  • Child labour: No ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.796 (2018)

Mean School Years: 9.4 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 16.3% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.0% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2003
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: .12% (2011)

Pension: 100% (2010)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

No nationally representative data is available on child labour prevalence in Mauritius.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on ILO-SIMPOC methods and guidelines for defining, measuring and collecting data on child labour.

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Mauritius.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Mauritius.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Mauritius between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Mauritius is 0.796. This score indicates that human development is high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Mauritius over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Mauritius showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Mauritius.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. In this Act –
“”forced labour”” means labour or services obtained or maintained through threats, the use of force, intimidation or other forms of coercion, or physical restraint;”

Constitution of Mauritius, 1968

“6 Protection from slavery and forced labour
1. No person shall be held in slavery or servitude.
2. No person shall be required to perform forced labour.
3. For the purposes of this section, the expression “forced labour” does not include –

a. any labour required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court;
b. labour required of any person while he is lawfully detained that, though not required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court, is reasonably necessary in the interests of hygiene or for the maintenance of the place at which he is detained;
c. any labour required of a member of a disciplined force in pursuance of his duties as such or, in the case of a person who has conscientious objections to service as a member of a naval, military or air force, any labour that person is required by law to perform in place of such service; or
d. any labour required during a period of public emergency or in the event of any other emergency or calamity that threatens the life or well-being of the community, to the extent that the requiring of such labour is reasonably justifiable, in the circumstances of any situation arising or existing during that period or as a result of that other emergency or calamity, for the purpose of dealing with that situation.”

Child Labour

Workers’ Rights Act 2019 (No. 20 of 2019).

“2. Interpretation In this Act –
“”child”” means a person under the age of 16;
“young person” means a person, other than a child, who is under the age of 18.”

PART IV – WORK AGREEMENTS Sub-Part I – Competency to Enter into Agreement 10. Competency to enter into agreement A person who is of the age of 16 or more shall be competent to enter into an agreement and shall, in relation to the agreement and to its enforcement, be deemed to be of full age and capacity.

PART III – MINIMUM AGE FOR EMPLOYMENT 8. Restriction on employment of children (1) No person shall employ a child for employment or work in any occupation. (2) For the purpose of subsection (1), a child shall not be considered to be employed for employment or work where, during school holidays or outside school hours, the child remains at the place of work of his parent or assists his parent in a family business in a light job which is not harmful to his health or his development or prejudicial to his participation in a vocational orientation or training programme.

“9. Employment of young persons
(1) No person shall employ, or continue to employ, a young
person –

(a) in work which, by its nature, or the circumstances
in which it is carried out, is likely to jeopardise his
health, safety, or physical, mental, moral or social
development; or (b) after being notified in writing by the supervising officer
that the kind of work for which he is employed is
unsuitable, or is likely to interfere with his education.

(2) Every employer shall keep a record of every young person
employed by him, stating, in the record, his full name, address, date of
birth and such other details as may be prescribed. ”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Workers’ Rights Act 2019 (No. 20 of 2019).

“20. Normal working hours
(6) No person shall employ a young person in an undertaking
between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.”

Occupational Safety and Health Act, 2005

“8. Prohibitions regarding young persons
No employer shall employ a young person in any activity involving –

a. work with explosives;
b. exposure to ionising radiation;
c. work with heavy metals, including lead and mercury;
d. work in the forestry and construction sector;
e. work or exposure to any form of asbestos;
f. exposure to benzene or other harmful organic solvents;
g. exposure to aromatic amines;
h. exposure to prescribed noise or vibration;
i. work in compressed air or in confined spaces; and
(j) any work which is harmful to the health and safety of that person.”

Child Protection Act, 1994, amend. 2009

“2 Interpretation
In this Act –
“child” means any unmarried person under the age of 18;”

“17 Mendicity
Any person who causes or allows any child under his care to beg shall commit an offence.”

Child Protection Act, 1994, amend. 2009

“13A Child trafficking
1. Any person who wilfully and unlawfully recruits, transports, transfers, harbours or receives a child for the purpose of exploitation shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.
2. Any person who wilfully and unlawfully recruits, transports, transfers, harbours or receives a child –

a. outside Mauritius for the purpose of exploitation in Mauritius;
b. in Mauritius for the purpose of exploitation outside Mauritius,
shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.

3. Any person, who, in any place outside Mauritius, does an act preparatory to, or in furtherance of, the commission of an offence under subsection 1., shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.

4. a. Any person who takes part in any transaction the object or one of the objects of which is to transfer or confer, wholly or partly, temporarily or permanently, the possession, custody or control of a child in return for any valuable consideration shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.
b. Any person who, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, harbours or has in his possession, custody or control of any child in respect of whom the temporary or permanent possession, custody or control has been transferred or conferred for valuable consideration by any other person in or outside Mauritius, shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.

5. a. No press report of any court proceedings relating to an offence under this section shall include any particulars calculated to lead to the identification of any child who is the victim of that offence, nor shall any photograph or picture be published in any newspaper or broadcast as being or including a photograph or picture of that child.
b. Any person who contravenes paragraph a. shall commit an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable in respect of each offence to a fine not exceeding 100,000 rupees and to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.

6. Part X of the Criminal Procedure Act and the Probation of Offenders Act shall not apply to a person liable to be sentenced under this section.

7. Where the Court finds that a person who has parental responsibility and rights in respect of a minor has committed an offence under this section in relation to that minor, it may –

a. suspend the parental responsibilities and rights of that person; and
b. order the minor to be admitted to a place of safety, for such period as it thinks fit.
b. by adding, after subsection 7., the following new subsection –

8. In this section, “exploitation” has the same meaning as in the Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act 2009.”

Human Trafficking

Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. In this Act –
“”trafficking” means –

a. the recruitment, sale, supply, procurement, capture, removal, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a person –

i. by the use of threat, force, intimidation, coercion, abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or abuse of a position of vulnerability; or
ii. by the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to obtain the consent of a person having control or authority over another person; or

b. the adoption of a person facilitated or secured through illegal means, for the purpose of exploitation;”

Slavery

Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. In this Act –
“”slavery”” means the exercise of any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership over a person;”

Constitution of Mauritius, 1968

“6 Protection from slavery and forced labour
1. No person shall be held in slavery or servitude.
2. No person shall be required to perform forced labour.
3. For the purposes of this section, the expression “forced labour” does not include –

a. any labour required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court;
b. labour required of any person while he is lawfully detained that, though not required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court, is reasonably necessary in the interests of hygiene or for the maintenance of the place at which he is detained;
c. any labour required of a member of a disciplined force in pursuance of his duties as such or, in the case of a person who has conscientious objections to service as a member of a naval, military or air force, any labour that person is required by law to perform in place of such service; or
d. any labour required during a period of public emergency or in the event of any other emergency or calamity that threatens the life or well-being of the community, to the extent that the requiring of such labour is reasonably justifiable, in the circumstances of any situation arising or existing during that period or as a result of that other emergency or calamity, for the purpose of dealing with that situation.”

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1969

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1969

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 1990 (minimum age specified: 15 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2000

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Succession to the Convention as amended 1969

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Succession 1969

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Accession 2003

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Accession 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratiification 2009

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2011

National Action Plans, National Strategies

Child Safety Online Action Plan, 2009

“Aims to prevent sexual exploitation of children on the Internet by strengthening the legal framework and developing awareness-raising programs. Implemented by the Ministry of Information and Communication Technology, in conjunction with MOGE, the Minors’ Brigade and the Office of the Ombudsperson for Children. In February 2016, organized workshops as part of Safer Internet Day.”

Government Development Program-Achieving Meaningful Change (2015-2019)

“Aims to increase access to social protection services for vulnerable populations, including children, and emphasizes a zero tolerance policy for the use of children in drug trafficking.”

Education and Human Resources Strategy Plan (2008-2020)

“Aims to improve equity of access to primary, secondary, and technical and vocational education, and to provide social services for youth. Overseen by the Ministry of Education. In 2016, developed 9-year schooling strategy to expand education access for children with learning difficulties.”

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, General

Child Protection Act, 1994, amend. 2009

“4 Emergency protection order
1. Where a district magistrate is satisfied by information on oath that the Permanent Secretary has reasonable cause to believe that a child is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm, the District Magistrate shall issue an emergency protection order.
2. An information on oath and an emergency protection order shall be in the form set out in the Schedule.
3. Notwithstanding any other enactment, an emergency protection order shall, while it is in force, confer on the Permanent Secretary authority to –

a. summon any person with or without the child to give evidence for the purpose of verifying whether the child is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm;
b. enter any premises specified in the order, where necessary by force, and search for the child, provided that the order or a copy thereof shall be produced to the occupier of the premises on request;
c. remove or return the child to, or to prevent the child’s removal from, any place of safety;
d. where necessary for the welfare of the child, cause him to be submitted to medical examination or to urgent treatment;
e. request police or medical assistance for the exercise of any power under the order.

4. The owner, occupier or person in charge of any premises which the Permanent Secretary or any person lawfully assisting him enters under an emergency protection order shall provide the Permanent Secretary or the person lawfully assisting him with all reasonable facilities and assistance for the effective exercise of his powers under the order.”

Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“4. Centres for victims of trafficking
1. The Minister shall –

a. cause to be set up one or more Centres which shall be premises for the provision of temporary accommodation suited for the needs of victims of trafficking admitted to them;
b. designate an investigating officer to be in charge of each Centre.

2. Every Centre –

a. shall secure the safety of its inmates against any risk of retaliation;
b. shall provide counselling and rehabilitation services to its inmates;
c. shall facilitate the integration of its inmates into their families;
d. may offer facilities aimed at providing education, skills development and training;
e. shall, where necessary, provide reception, care and other facilities for a child who is in the care and custody of an inmate.

3. The officer in charge of a Centre shall, on the admission of an inmate, make an assessment to determine –

a. the risks to the safety of the inmate and of any child in his care and custody;
b. the immediate and long term needs of the inmate.

4. A Judge in Chambers may, on the application of an investigating officer, order that an adult shall be admitted to a Centre for such period as he may determine.”

“6. Suspension of deportation
1. Notwithstanding any other enactment, the Minister may allow a victim of trafficking who is a non-citizen, regardless of his status, to remain in Mauritius for a non-renewable period not exceeding 42 days.

2. The non-renewable period referred to in subsection 1. shall not depend upon the willingness of a victim of trafficking to cooperate with investigating officers and prosecuting authorities in the investigation and prosecution of a case of trafficking.”

“7. Temporary residence
1. Notwithstanding any other enactment, a visitor’s permit may, subject to the prescribed conditions, be issued by the Minister to a victim of trafficking who –

a. is present in Mauritius;
b. has agreed to co-operate with investigating officers and prosecuting authorities in the investigation and prosecution of a case of trafficking; and
c. is placed in the care of a Centre or of any other authorised person, organisation or institution.

2. A visitor’s permit referred to in subsection 1. may be issued to a victim of trafficking regardless of –

a. his status; or
b. whether a non-renewable period contemplated in section 61. was granted or has expired.

3. The Minister may, on humanitarian grounds, extend a visitor’s permit, taking into account the likelihood that the holder of the permit may be harmed, killed or trafficked again if returned to his country of origin or the country from which he has been trafficked.”

“8. Repatriation of victims of trafficking
1. No victim of trafficking, who is a non-citizen, may, unless he agrees to the proposed course of action, be returned to his country of origin or the country from which he has been trafficked without due consideration being given to –

a. his safety during the repatriation process;
b. his safety in the country to which he is to be returned; and
c. the possibility that he may be harmed, killed or trafficked again.

2. Where a decision has been made to return a person who is a victim of trafficking to his country of origin or the country from which he has been trafficked –

a. the Minister shall take steps to obtain information relating to an institution or organisation which renders assistance to victims of trafficking in the country to which the person is to be returned and which is willing to provide assistance to that
person; and
b. the person shall, in the prescribed manner, be informed of any arrangements which have been made for his reception in the country to which he is to be returned.”

“9. Return of victims of trafficking to Mauritius
Where a victim of trafficking is a citizen or a permanent resident of Mauritius and is to be returned to Mauritius, the Minister shall –

a. where the victim is a minor and it is in his interest to do so, designate an adult, at State expense, to escort the minor home;
b. facilitate and accept the return of the victim;
c. where necessary, take measures to secure the reception of the victim at a Mauritian port of entry;
d. issue such travel document or other authorisation as may be necessary to enable the victim to return;
e. at the request of another State which is a party to the United Nations Protocol or to any other agreement relating to trafficking in persons to which Mauritius is a party, verify that a person who is a victim of trafficking is a citizen or permanent resident of Mauritius;
f. on entry into Mauritius, where the victim of trafficking –

i. is a minor, refer him to the Child Development Unit;
ii. is an adult, refer him to a Centre, for such assistance as may be appropriate.”

“16. Compensation to victim of trafficking
1. The Court before which a person is convicted of an offence under section 11 may, in addition to any penalty which it may impose in respect of the offence, order the person convicted to pay appropriate compensation to a victim of the offence for –

a. damage to, or loss or destruction of, property, including money;
b. physical, psychological or other injury; or
c. loss of income or support, resulting from the commission of the offence.

2. An order made under subsection 1. may award compensation not exceeding 500,000 rupees.
3. Where the Court orders compensation under subsection 1., it shall determine the time within which payment is to be made and the method of payment.
4. In assessing the compensation which a person may be ordered to pay, the Court shall consider the means of the offender.
5. The Court may, where it thinks fit, suspend the sentence imposed for the offence on condition of the payment of appropriate compensation to the victim of the offence.
6. Where the amount of damage, injury or loss suffered exceeds an award made under subsection 1., the victim may recover the excess by means of a civil action.”

“17. Payment of compensation
Where a person is ordered to pay compensation, the Court may in its discretion enforce the payment of compensation –

a. by allowing the person to pay compensation on such conditions and in such instalments at the intervals it deems fit;
b. where the amount expected to be recovered will be sufficient to cover, in addition to the amount of compensation, the costs and expenses involved, by attachment and sale of any property belonging to the person.”

“18. Failure to pay compensation
1. Where a Court has ordered a person to pay compensation and suspended a sentence pursuant to section 165. and the compensation is not paid in full or recovered in full, the Court which made the order may –

a. summon the person to appear before it; or
b. issue a warrant directing that the person be arrested and brought before the Court.

2. When a person referred to in subsection 1. is brought before the Court, it may, unless the amount due is paid or recovered forthwith, reimpose the sentence which has been suspended, or such lesser sentence as the Court thinks fit taking into account the amount of compensation already paid or recovered.

19. Compensation to State
The Court may –

a. in addition to any sentence imposed in respect of an offence under section 11 and to any order for compensation to a victim made under section 16; and
b. on application made on behalf of the State, make an order for payment to the State of an amount in compensation for expenses incurred, or reasonably expected to be incurred, in connection with the care, accommodation, transportation and repatriation of the victim of the offence.”

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Workers’ Rights Act 2019 (No. 20 of 2019)

123. Offences

Child Protection Act, 1994, amend. 2009

“18 Offences and penalties
1. Any person who molests, hinders or obstructs the Permanent Secretary or any person assisting him in the exercise of his powers under this Act shall commit an offence.
2. Any person who without reasonable cause fails to comply with a summons issued under this Act or wilfully refuses to give evidence or gives material evidence that is false or grossly misleading shall commit an offence.
3. Any person who contravenes this Act or any subsidiary enactment made under this Act shall commit an offence.
4. Any person who commits an offence under section 9, 13 or 16 shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding 10,000 rupees and to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years.
6. Any person who commits an offence under this Act for which no specific penalty is provided shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding 5,000 rupees and to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“11. Trafficking in persons
1. a. Any person who trafficks another person or allows another person to be trafficked shall commit an offence.
b. It shall not be a defence to a charge under paragraph a. that a person who is a victim of trafficking, or a person having control or authority over a minor who is a victim of trafficking, has consented to the act which was intended to constitute trafficking.

2. Any person who knowingly –
a. leases a room, house, building or establishment or subleases or allows it to be used, for the purpose of harbouring a victim of trafficking; or
b. advertises, publishes, prints, broadcasts, distributes, or causes the advertisement, publication, broadcast or distribution of, information which suggests or alludes to trafficking by any means, including the use of the internet or other information technology, shall commit an offence.

3. a. Every internet service provider operating in Mauritius shall be under a duty to report to the Police forthwith any site on its server which contains information in contravention of subsection 2.b..
b. Any internet service provider who fails to comply with paragraph a. shall commit an offence.

4. Any person who knowingly benefits, financially or otherwise, from the services of a victim of trafficking or uses, or enables another person’s usage of, the services of a victim of trafficking shall commit an offence.”

“14. Penalties
1. Any person who commits an offence under section 11 shall, on conviction, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding 15 years.
2. Any person who commits an offence under section 12 shall, on conviction, be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years and to a fine not exceeding 100,000 rupees.
3. The Community Service Order Act, Part X of the Criminal Procedure Act and the Probation of OffendersAct shall not apply to a person liable to be sentenced under subsection 1..”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Mauritius. If you are a representative of Mauritius and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.