Data Dashboards

Mexico Dashboard
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2000 and 2015 decreased by 68%.

-68%

2000- 2015

Best 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.762 (2015)

Mean School Years: 8.6 years (2015)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: No data

Working Poverty Rate: 2.2% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2003
Social Protections Coverage

General (at least one): 73% (2016)

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 100% (2014)

Vulnerable: 64% (2016)

Children: 25% (2016)

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Mexico, the percentage of child labourers has decreased overall from 2000 to 2015.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Mexico, the latest estimates show that 1.6 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The number is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 5.9 percent in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Mexico, the latest estimates show that 12.8 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The percentage is higher than in 2014, but has decreased from 22.3 percent in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2015 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Mexico was 16.4 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 23.2 hours in 2014. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2015, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 36.3 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2014, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 39.9.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week for children aged 5-14.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 5.5 hours per week according to the 2015 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2014, which found that children aged 5-14 in Mexico worked an average of 7.9 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000-2015.

Children in Economic Activity by tor, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Mexico is from 2015. By the 2015 estimate, the Other Services sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Agriculture sector and the Manufacturing sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Mexico.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Mexico.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data through their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

 Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways. 

The chart displays information on human development in Mexico between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that the average human development score in Mexico is 0.762. This score indicates that human development is high.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Mexico over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.”  However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases the vulnerability of individuals to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts.

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries for migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking, and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Mexico.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajo Forzado (Forced Labour)

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Artículo 22. Hay trabajo forzado cuando el mismo se obtiene mediante:

I. Uso de la fuerza, la amenaza de la fuerza, coerción física, o amenazas de coerción física a esa persona o a otra persona, o bien utilizando la fuerza o la amenaza de la fuerza de una organización criminal;
II. Daño grave o amenaza de daño grave a esa persona que la ponga en condiciones de vulnerabilidad;
III. El abuso o amenaza de la denuncia ante las autoridades de su situación migratoria irregular en el país o de cualquier otro abuso en la utilización de la ley o proceso legal, que provoca que el sujeto pasivo se someta a condiciones injustas o que atenten contra su dignidad.

Explotación laboral (Labour exploitation)

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Article 21. Existe explotación laboral cuando una persona obtiene, directa o indirectamente, beneficio injustificable, económico o de otra índole, de manera ilícita, mediante el trabajo ajeno, sometiendo a la persona a prácticas que atenten contra su dignidad, tales como:

I. Condiciones peligrosas o insalubres, sin las protecciones necesarias de acuerdo a la legislación laboral o las normas existentes para el desarrollo de una actividad o industria;
II. Existencia de una manifiesta desproporción entre la cantidad de trabajo realizado y el pago efectuado por ello, o
III. Salario por debajo de lo legalmente establecido.

Artículo 23. No se considerará que hay trabajo o servicio forzado, ni explotación laboral, cuando:

I. Se exija en virtud de las leyes sobre el servicio militar obligatorio;
II. Forme parte de las obligaciones cívicas normales de los ciudadanos hacia la Federación, el Distrito Federal o sus demarcaciones territoriales, los estados o municipios;
III. Se exija a una persona en virtud de una condena pronunciada por sentencia judicial, o en los términos del Artículo 21 Constitucional como trabajo a favor de la comunidad, a condición de que este trabajo o servicio se realice bajo la vigilancia y control de las autoridades públicas, y que dicha persona no sea cedida o puesta a disposición de particulares, compañías o personas jurídicas de carácter privado;
IV. Los trabajos sean voluntarios y realizados por integrantes de una comunidad en beneficio directo de la misma y, por consiguiente pueden considerarse como obligaciones cívicas normales que incumben a los miembros de la comunidad local, nacional o a una organización internacional, a grupos o asociaciones de la sociedad civil e instituciones de beneficencia pública o privada

Child Labour

Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos de 1917 amend. Decreto por el que se reforma la Constitución Política, 2014

Artículo 123.III. Queda prohibida la utilización del trabajo de los menores de quince años. Los mayores de esta edad y menores de dieciséis tendrán como jornada máxima la de seis horas.

Ley Federal del Trabajo, Artículo amend. Decreto de 30 de abril de 2015

Artículo 22.- Queda prohibida la utilización del trabajo de los menores de catorce años y de los mayores de esta edad y menores de dieciséis que no hayan terminado su educación obligatoria, salvo los casos de excepción que apruebe la autoridad correspondiente en que a su juicio haya compatibilidad entre los estudios y el trabajo.

Artículo 22 Bis.- Cuando las autoridades del trabajo detecten trabajando a un menor de 14 años fuera del círculo familiar, ordenará que de inmediato cese en sus labores. Al patrón que incurra en esta conducta se le sancionará con la pena establecida en el artículo 995 Bis de esta Ley. En caso de que el menor no estuviere devengando el salario que perciba un trabajador que preste los mismos servicios, el patrón deberá resarcirle las diferencias. Se entenderá por círculo familiar a los parientes del menor, por consanguinidad, ascendientes o colaterales; hasta el segundo grado.

Artículo 23.- Los mayores de dieciséis años pueden prestar libremente sus servicios, con las limitaciones establecidas en esta Ley. Los mayores de catorce y menores de dieciséis necesitan autorización de sus padres o tutores y a falta de ellos, del sindicato a que pertenezcan, de la Junta de Conciliación y Arbitraje, del Inspector del Trabajo o de la Autoridad Política. Los menores trabajadores pueden percibir el pago de sus salarios y ejercitar las acciones que les correspondan.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Ley Federal del Trabajo, Artículo amend. Decreto de 30 de abril de 2015

Artículo 175. Queda prohibida la utilización del trabajo de los menores de dieciocho años:

I. En establecimientos no industriales después de las diez de la noche;
II. En expendios de bebidas embriagantes de consumo inmediato, cantinas o tabernas y centros de vicio;
III. En trabajos susceptibles de afectar su moralidad o buenas costumbres; y
IV. En labores peligrosas o insalubres que, por la naturaleza del trabajo, por las condiciones físicas, químicas o biológicas del medio en que se presta, o por la composición de la materia prima que se utiliza, son capaces de actuar sobre la vida, el desarrollo y la salud física y mental de los menores, en términos de lo previsto en el artículo 176 de esta Ley.

Trata de Personas (Trafficking in Persons)

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Artículo 10. Toda acción u omisión dolosa de una o varias personas para captar, enganchar, transportar, transferir, retener, entregar, recibir o alojar a una o varias personas con fines de explotación se le impondrá de 5 a 15 años de prisión y de un mil a veinte mil días multa, sin perjuicio de las sanciones que correspondan para cada uno de los delitos cometidos, previstos y sancionados en esta Ley y en los códigos penales correspondientes.

Se entenderá por explotación de una persona a:

I. La esclavitud, de conformidad con el artículo 11 de la presente Ley;
II. La condición de siervo, de conformidad con el artículo 12 de la presente Ley;
III. La prostitución ajena u otras formas de explotación sexual, en los términos de los artículos 13 a 20 de la presente Ley;
IV. La explotación laboral, en los términos del artículo 21 de la presente Ley;
V. El trabajo o servicios forzados, en los términos del artículo 22 de la presente Ley;
VI. La mendicidad forzosa, en los términos del artículo 24 de la presente Ley;
VII. La utilización de personas menores de dieciocho años en actividades delictivas, en los términos del artículo 25 de la presente Ley;
VIII. La adopción ilegal de persona menor de dieciocho años, en los términos de los artículos 26 y 27 de la presente Ley;
IX. El matrimonio forzoso o servil, en los términos del artículo 28 de la presente Ley, así como la situación prevista en el artículo 29;
X. Tráfico de órganos, tejidos y células de seres humanos vivos, en los términos del artículo 30 de la presente Ley; y
XI. Experimentación biomédica ilícita en seres humanos, en los términos del artículo 31 de la presente Ley.

Esclavitud (Slavery)

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Artículo 11. Se entiende por esclavitud el dominio de una persona sobre otra, dejándola sin capacidad de disponer libremente de su propia persona ni de sus bienes y se ejerciten sobre ella, de hecho, atributos del derecho de propiedad.

Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos de 1917

Artículo 1. En los Estados Unidos Mexicanos todo individuo gozará de las garantías que otorga esta Constitución, las cuales no podrán restringirse ni suspenderse, sino en los casos y con las condiciones que ella misma establece. Está prohibida la esclavitud en los Estados Unidos Mexicanos. Los esclavos del extranjero que entren al territorio nacional alcanzarán, por este solo hecho, su libertad y la protección de las leyes.

Commitments
National Strategies

Plan Nacional de Desarrollo 2013-2018

“Propiciar la tipificación del delito de trata de personas y su armonización con el marco legal vigente. Llevar a cabo campañas nacionales de sensibilización sobre los riesgos y consecuencias de la trata de personas orientadas a mujeres, así como sobre la discriminación de género y los tipos y modalidades de violencias contra las mujeres.”

“Estrategia 4.3.2. Promover el trabajo digno o decente. Contribuir a la erradicación del trabajo infantil”

Programa Nacional para Prevenir, Sancionar y Erradicar los Delitos en Materia de Trata de Personas y para la Protección y Asistencia a las Víctimas de estos Delitos 2014-2018

International Ratifications

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1959

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2015

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2000

Slavery Convention 1926, and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Definitive signature 1954

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Ratified 1959

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2003

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2002

Governments can take action to assists victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Policies for Assistance

Ley General de Víctimas, 2013

Artículo 5. Los mecanismos, medidas y procedimientos establecidos en esta Ley, serán diseñados, implementados y evaluados aplicando los principios siguientes:

  • Dignidad. La dignidad humana es un valor, principio y derecho fundamental base y condición de todos los demás. Implica la comprensión de la persona como titular y sujeto de derechos y a no ser objeto de violencia o arbitrariedades por parte del Estado o de los particulares. En virtud de la dignidad humana de la víctima, todas las autoridades del Estado están obligadas en todo momento a respetar su autonomía, a considerarla y tratarla como fin de su actuación. Igualmente, todas las autoridades del Estado están obligadas a garantizar que no se vea disminuido el mínimo existencial al que la víctima tiene derecho, ni sea afectado el núcleo esencial de sus derechos. En cualquier caso, toda norma, institución o acto que se desprenda de la presente Ley serán interpretados de conformidad con los derechos humanos reconocidos por la Constitución y los Tratados Internacionales de los que el Estado Mexicano sea Parte, aplicando siempre la norma más benéfica para la persona.
  • Buena fe. Las autoridades presumirán la buena fe de las víctimas. Los servidores públicos que intervengan con motivo del ejercicio de derechos de las víctimas no deberán criminalizar o responsabilizarse por su situación de víctima y deberán brindarle los servicios de ayuda, atención y asistencia desde el momento en que lo requiera, así como respetar y permitir el ejercicio efectivo de sus derechos.
  • Complementariedad.- Los mecanismos, medidas y procedimientos contemplados en esta Ley, en especial los relacionados con la de asistencia, ayuda, protección, atención y reparación integral a las víctimas, deberán realizarse de manera armónica, eficaz y eficiente entendiéndose siempre como complementarias y no excluyentes. Tanto las reparaciones individuales, administrativas o judiciales, como las reparaciones colectivas deben ser complementarias para alcanzar la integralidad que busca la reparación.
  • Debida diligencia. El Estado deberá realizar todas las actuaciones necesarias dentro de un tiempo razonable para lograr el objeto de esta Ley, en especial la prevención, ayuda, atención, asistencia, derecho a la verdad, justicia y reparación integral a fin de que la víctima sea tratada y considerada como sujeto titular de derecho. El Estado deberá remover los obstáculos que impidan el acceso real y efectivo de las víctimas a las medidas reguladas por la presente Ley, realizar prioritariamente acciones encaminadas al fortalecimiento de sus derechos, contribuir a su recuperación como sujetos en ejercicio pleno de sus derechos y deberes, así como evaluar permanentemente el impacto de las acciones que se implementen a favor de las víctimas.
  • Enfoque diferencial y especializado. Esta Ley reconoce la existencia de grupos de población con características particulares o con mayor situación de vulnerabilidad en razón de su edad, género, preferencia u orientación sexual, etnia, condición de discapacidad y otros, en consecuencia, se reconoce que ciertos daños requieren de una atención especializada que responda a las particularidades y grado de vulnerabilidad de las víctimas. Las autoridades que deban aplicar esta Ley ofrecerán, en el ámbito de sus respectivas competencias, garantías especiales y medidas de protección a los grupos expuestos a un mayor riesgo de violación de sus derechos, como niñas y niños, jóvenes, mujeres, adultos mayores, personas en situación de discapacidad, migrantes, miembros de pueblos indígenas, personas defensoras de derechos humanos, periodistas y personas en situación de desplazamiento interno. En todo momento se reconocerá el interés superior del menor. Este principio incluye la adopción de medidas que respondan a la atención de dichas particularidades y grado de vulnerabilidad, reconociendo igualmente que ciertos daños sufridos por su gravedad requieren de un tratamiento especializado para dar respuesta a su rehabilitación y reintegración a la sociedad.
  • Enfoque transformador. Las autoridades que deban aplicar la presente Ley realizarán, en el ámbito de sus respectivas competencias, los esfuerzos necesarios encaminados a que las medidas de ayuda, protección, atención, asistencia y reparación integral a las que tienen derecho las víctimas contribuyan a la eliminación de los esquemas de discriminación y marginación que pudieron ser la causa de los hechos victimizantes.
  • Gratuidad. Todas las acciones, mecanismos, procedimientos y cualquier otro trámite que implique el derecho de acceso a la justicia y demás derechos reconocidos en esta Ley, serán gratuitos para la víctima.
  • Igualdad y no discriminación. En el ejercicio de los derechos y garantías de las víctimas y en todos los procedimientos a los que se refiere la presente Ley, las autoridades se conducirán sin distinción, exclusión o restricción, ejercida por razón de sexo, raza, color, orígenes étnicos, sociales, nacionales, lengua, religión, opiniones políticas, ideológicas o de cualquier otro tipo, género, edad, preferencia u orientación sexual, estado civil, condiciones de salud, pertenencia a una minoría nacional, patrimonio y discapacidades, o cualquier otra que tenga por objeto o efecto impedir o anular el reconocimiento o el ejercicio de los derechos y la igualdad real de oportunidades de las personas. Toda garantía o mecanismo especial deberá fundarse en razones de enfoque diferencial.
  • Integralidad, indivisibilidad e interdependencia. Todos los derechos contemplados en esta Ley se encuentran interrelacionados entre sí. No se puede garantizar el goce y ejercicio de los mismos sin que a la vez se garantice el resto de los derechos. La violación de un derecho pondrá en riesgo el ejercicio de otros. Para garantizar la integralidad, la asistencia, atención, ayuda y reparación integral a las víctimas se realizará de forma multidisciplinaria y especializada.
  • Máxima protección. Toda autoridad de los órdenes de gobierno debe velar por la aplicación más amplia de medidas de protección a la dignidad, libertad, seguridad y demás derechos de las víctimas del delito y de violaciones a los derechos humanos. Las autoridades adoptarán en todo momento, medidas para garantizar la seguridad, protección, bienestar físico y psicológico e intimidad de las víctimas.
  • Mínimo existencial. Constituye una garantía fundada en la dignidad humana como presupuesto del Estado democrático y consiste en la obligación del Estado de proporcionar a la víctima y a su núcleo familiar un lugar en el que se les preste la atención adecuada para que superen su condición y se asegure su subsistencia con la debida dignidad que debe ser reconocida a las personas en cada momento de su existencia.
  • No criminalización.- Las autoridades no deberán agravar el sufrimiento de la víctima ni tratarla en ningún caso como sospechosa o responsable de la comisión de los hechos que denuncie. Ninguna autoridad o particular podrá especular públicamente sobre la pertenencia de las víctimas al crimen organizado o su vinculación con alguna actividad delictiva. La estigmatización, el prejuicio y las consideraciones de tipo subjetivo deberán evitarse.
  • Victimización secundaria. Las características y condiciones particulares de la víctima no podrán ser motivo para negarle su calidad. El Estado tampoco podrá exigir mecanismos o procedimientos que agraven su condición ni establecer requisitos que obstaculicen e impidan el ejercicio de sus derechos ni la expongan a sufrir un nuevo daño por la conducta de los servidores públicos.
  • Participación conjunta. Para superar la vulnerabilidad de las víctimas, el Estado deberá implementar medidas de ayuda, atención, asistencia y reparación integral con el apoyo y colaboración de la sociedad civil y el sector privado, incluidos los grupos o colectivos de víctimas. La víctima tiene derecho a colaborar con las investigaciones y las medidas para lograr superar su condición de vulnerabilidad, atendiendo al contexto, siempre y cuando las medidas no impliquen un detrimento a sus derechos.
  • Progresividad y no regresividad.- Las autoridades que deben aplicar la presente Ley tendrán la obligación de realizar todas las acciones necesarias para garantizar los derechos reconocidos en la misma y no podrán retroceder o supeditar los derechos, estándares o niveles de cumplimiento alcanzados.
  • Publicidad. Todas las acciones, mecanismos y procedimientos deberán ser públicos, siempre que esto no vulnere los derechos humanos de las víctimas o las garantías para su protección. El Estado deberá implementar mecanismos de difusión eficaces a fin de brindar información y orientación a las víctimas acerca de los derechos, garantías y recursos, así como acciones, mecanismos y procedimientos con los que cuenta, los cuales deberán ser dirigidos a las víctimas y publicitarse de forma clara y accesible.
  • Rendición de cuentas. Las autoridades y funcionarios encargados de la implementación de la Ley, así como de los planes y programas que esta Ley regula, estarán sujetos a mecanismos efectivos de rendición de cuentas y de evaluación que contemplen la participación de la sociedad civil, particularmente de víctimas y colectivos de víctimas.
  • Transparencia. Todas las acciones, mecanismos y procedimientos que lleve a cabo el Estado en ejercicio de sus obligaciones para con las víctimas, deberán instrumentarse de manera que garanticen el acceso a la información, así como el seguimiento y control correspondientes. Las autoridades deberán contar con mecanismos efectivos de rendición de cuentas y de evaluación de las políticas, planes y programas que se instrumenten para garantizar los derechos de las víctimas.
  • Trato preferente. Todas las autoridades en el ámbito de sus competencias tienen la obligación de garantizar el trato digno y preferente a las víctimas.

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Artículo 37. No se procederá en contra de la víctima de los delitos previstos en esta Ley por delitos que hubiesen cometido mientras estuvieran sujetas al control o amenaza de sus victimarios, cuando no les sea exigible otra conducta.

Artículo 38. Las víctimas extranjeras de delitos en materia de trata de personas, no serán sujetas a las sanciones previstas en la Ley de Migración u otros ordenamientos legales, por su situación migratoria irregular o por la adquisición o posesión de documentos de identificación apócrifos. Tampoco serán mantenidas en centros de detención o prisión en ningún momento antes, durante o después de todos los procedimientos administrativos o judiciales que correspondan.

Artículo 48. Cuando una persona sea declarada penalmente responsable de la comisión de los delitos previstos en esta Ley, el Juez deberá condenarla al pago de la reparación del daño a favor de la víctima u ofendidos, en todos los casos. La reparación del daño, deberá ser plena y efectiva, proporcional a la gravedad del daño causado y a la afectación del proyecto de vida,

Penalties
Penalties, Forced Labour

Ley Federal del Trabajo, Artículo amend. Decreto de 30 de abril de 2015

Artículo 995 Bis. Al patrón que infrinja lo dispuesto en el artículo 23, primer párrafo de esta Ley, se le castigará con prisión de 1 a 4 años y multa de 250 a 5000 veces el salario mínimo general.

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Código Penal para el distrito federal en materia de fuero común, y para toda la República en materia de fuero federal.

Artículo 205 bis. Las sanciones señaladas en los artículos 200, 201, 202, 203 y 204 se aumentarán al doble de la que corresponda cuando el autor tuviere para con la víctima, alguna de las siguientes relaciones:

a) Los que ejerzan la patria potestad, guarda o custodia;
b) Ascendientes o descendientes sin límite de grado;
c) Familiares en línea colateral hasta cuarto grado;
d) Tutores o curadores;
e) Aquél que ejerza sobre la víctima en virtud de una relación laboral, docente, doméstica, médica o cualquier otra que implique una subordinación de la víctima;
f) Quien se valga de función pública para cometer el delito;
g) Quien habite en el mismo domicilio de la víctima;
h) Al ministro de un culto religioso;
i) Cuando el autor emplee violencia física, psicológica o moral en contra de la víctima; y
j) Quien esté ligado con la víctima por un lazo afectivo o de amistad, de gratitud, o algún otro que pueda influir en obtener la confianza de ésta.

En los casos de los incisos a), b), c) y d) además de las sanciones señaladas, los autores del delito perderán la patria potestad, tutela o curatela, según sea el caso, respecto de todos sus descendientes, el derecho a alimentos que pudiera corresponderle por su relación con la víctima y el derecho que pudiera tener respecto de los bienes de ésta.

En los casos de los incisos e), f) y h) además de las sanciones señaladas, se castigará con destitución e inhabilitación para desempeñar el cargo o comisión o cualquiera otro de carácter público o similar, hasta por un tiempo igual a la pena impuesta.
En todos los casos el juez acordará las medidas pertinentes para que se le prohíba permanentemente al ofensor tener cualquier tipo de contacto o relación con la víctima.

Artículo. 206.- El lenocinio se sancionará con prisión de dos a nueve años y de cincuenta a quinientos días multa.

Artículo 206 Bis.- Comete el delito de lenocinio:

I.- Toda persona que explote el cuerpo de otra por medio del comercio carnal, se mantenga de este comercio u obtenga de él un lucro cualquiera;
II.- Al que induzca o solicite a una persona para que con otra, comercie sexualmente con su cuerpo o le facilite los medios para que se entregue a la prostitución, y
III.- Al que regentee, administre o sostenga directa o indirectamente, prostíbulos, casas de cita o lugares de concurrencia expresamente dedicados a explotar la prostitución, u obtenga cualquier beneficio con sus productos

Artículo 85.- No se concederá la libertad preparatoria a:

II. Trata de personas previsto en los artículos 5 y 6 de la Ley para Prevenir y Sancionar la Trata de Personas.

Ley General para prevenir, sancionar y erradicar los delitos en materia de trata de personas y para la protección y asistencia a las víctimas de estos delitos, 2012

Artículo 11. A quien tenga o mantenga a otra persona en una situación de esclavitud, será sancionado con pena de 15 a 30 años prisión y de un mil a 20 mil días multa.

Artículo 12. A quien tenga o mantenga a una persona en condición de siervo será sancionado con pena de 5 a 10 años de prisión y de un mil a 20 mil días multa.

Artículo 13. Será sancionado con pena de 15 a 30 años de prisión y de un mil a 30 mil días multa, al que se beneficie de la explotación de una o más personas a través de la prostitución, la pornografía, las exhibiciones públicas o privadas de orden sexual, el turismo sexual o cualquier otra actividad sexual remunerada mediante:

I. El engaño;
II. La violencia física o moral;
III. El abuso de poder;
IV. El aprovechamiento de una situación de vulnerabilidad;
V. Daño grave o amenaza de daño grave; o
VI. La amenaza de denunciar ante autoridades respecto a su situación migratoria en el país o cualquier otro abuso de la utilización de la ley o procedimientos legales, que provoque que el sujeto pasivo se someta a las exigencias del activo. Tratándose de personas menores de edad o personas que no tiene la capacidad de comprender el significado del hecho no se requerirá la comprobación de los medios a los que hace referencia el presente artículo.

Artículo 14. Será sancionado con pena de 10 a 15 años de prisión y de un mil a 30 mil días multa, al que someta a una persona o se beneficie de someter a una persona para que realice actos pornográficos, o produzca o se beneficie de la producción de material pornográfico, o engañe o participe en engañar a una persona para prestar servicios sexuales o realizar actos pornográficos.

Artículo 15. Será sancionado con pena de 5 a 15 años de prisión y de un mil a 30 mil días multa, al que se beneficie económicamente de la explotación de una persona mediante el comercio, distribución, exposición, circulación u oferta de libros, revistas, escritos, grabaciones, filmes, fotografías, anuncios impresos, imágenes u objetos, de carácter lascivo o sexual, reales o simulados, sea de manera física, o a través de cualquier medio. No se sancionará a quien incurra en estas conductas con material que signifique o tenga como fin la divulgación científica, artística o técnica, o en su caso, la educación sexual o reproductiva. En caso de duda sobre la naturaleza de este material, el juez solicitará dictamen de peritos para evaluar la conducta en cuestión.

Artículo 16. Se impondrá pena de 15 a 30 años de prisión y de 2 mil a 60 mil días multa, así como el decomiso de los objetos, instrumentos y productos del delito, incluyendo la destrucción de los materiales resultantes, al que procure, promueve, oblique, publicite, gestione, facilite o induzca, por cualquier medio, a una persona menor de dieciocho años de edad, o que no tenga la capacidad de comprender el significado del hecho, o no tenga capacidad de resistir la conducta, a realizar actos sexuales o de exhibicionismo corporal, con fines sexuales, reales o simulados, con el objeto de producir material a través de video grabarlas, audio grabarlas, fotografiarlas, filmarlos, exhibirlos o describirlos a través de anuncios impresos, sistemas de cómputo, electrónicos o sucedáneos, y se beneficie económicamente de la explotación de la persona.

Si se hiciere uso de la fuerza, el engaño, la violencia física o psicológica, la coerción, el abuso de poder o de una situación de vulnerabilidad, las adicciones, una posición jerárquica o de confianza, o la concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre otra o cualquier otra circunstancia que disminuya o elimine la voluntad de la víctima para resistirse, la pena prevista en el párrafo anterior se aumentará en una mitad.

Se impondrán las mismas sanciones previstas en el primer párrafo del presente artículo, a quien financie, elabore, reproduzca, almacene, distribuya, comercialice, arriende, exponga, publicite, difunda, adquiera, intercambie o comparta, por cualquier medio, el material a que se refieren las conductas anteriores.

Artículo 17. Se impondrá pena de 5 a 15 años de prisión y de un mil a 20 mil días multa al que almacene, adquiera o arriende para sí o para un tercero, el material a que se refiere el artículo anterior, sin fines de comercialización o distribución.

Artículo 18. Se impondrá pena de 15 a 25 años de prisión y de un mil a 20 mil días multa, al que promueve, publicite, invite, facilite o gestione por cualquier medio a que una o más personas viajen al interior o exterior del territorio nacional con la finalidad de que realicen cualquier tipo de actos sexuales, reales o simulados, con una o varias personas menores de dieciocho años de edad, o con una o varias personas que no tienen capacidad para comprender el significado del hecho o con una o varias personas que no tienen capacidad para resistirlo, y se beneficie económicamente de ello.

Artículo 19. Será sancionado con pena de 5 a 10 años de prisión y de 4 mil a 30 mil días multa, el que contrate a una persona u oferte un trabajo distinto a los servicios sexuales y la induzca a realizarlos, bajo engaño en cualquiera de las siguientes circunstancias:

I. Que el acuerdo o contrato comprende la prestación de servicios sexuales; o
II. La naturaleza, frecuencia y condiciones específicas; o
III. La medida en que la persona tendrá libertad para abandonar el lugar o la zona a cambio de la realización de esas prácticas; o
IV. La medida en que la persona tendrá libertad para dejar el trabajo a cambio de la realización de esas prácticas; o
V. La medida en que la persona tendrá posibilidad de salir de su lugar de residencia a cambio de la realización de esas prácticas; o
VI. Si se alega que la persona ha contraído o contraerá una deuda en relación con el acuerdo: el monto, o la existencia de la suma adeudada o supuestamente adeudada.

Artículo 20. Será sancionado con pena de 5 a 10 años de prisión y de 4 mil a 30 mil días multa, el que, obteniendo beneficio económico para sí o para un tercero, contrate aun sea lícitamente, a otra para la prestación de servicios sexuales en las circunstancias de las fracciones II al VI del artículo anterior.

Artículo 21. Será sancionado con pena de 3 a 10 años de prisión, y de 5 mil a 50 mil días multa, quien explote laboralmente a una o más personas.

Artículo 22. Será sancionado con pena de 10 a 20 años de prisión, y de 5 mil a 50 mil días multa, quien tenga o mantenga a una persona en trabajos forzados.

Artículo 24. Será sancionado con prisión de 4 a 9 años y de 500 a 20 mil días multa, a quien utilice a una persona para realizar actos de mendicidad. Se entiende por explotación de la mendicidad ajena, obtener un beneficio al obligar a una persona a pedir limosna o caridad contra su voluntad, recurriendo a la amenaza de daño grave, un daño grave o al uso de la fuerza u otras formas de coacción, o el engaño. Si se utiliza con los fines del párrafo primero de este artículo a personas menores de dieciocho años, mayores de setenta, mujeres embarazadas, personas con lesiones, enfermedades o discapacidad física o psicológica, se impondrá pena de 9 a 15 años de prisión y de un mil a 25 mil días multa.

Artículo 25. Será sancionado con pena de 10 a 20 años de prisión y de un mil a 20 mil días multa, a quien utilice a personas menores de dieciocho años en cualquiera de las actividades delictivas señaladas en el artículo 2o de la Ley Federal contra la Delincuencia Organizada.

Artículo 26. Se impondrá pena de 20 a 40 años de prisión y de 2 mil a 20 mil días multa, al padre, madre, tutor o persona que tiene autoridad sobre quien se ejerce la conducta que entregue o reciba de forma ilegal, ilícita, irregular o incluso mediante adopción, a una persona menor de dieciocho años con el fin de abusar o explotar de ella sexualmente o cualquiera de las formas de explotación a que se refiere el artículo 10 de la presente Ley. En todos los casos en que se acredite esta conducta se declarará nula la adopción

Artículo 27. Se impondrá pena de 3 a 10 años de prisión y de 500 a 2 mil días multa, al que entregue en su carácter de padre o tutor o persona que tiene autoridad sobre quien se ejerce la conducta o reciba a título oneroso, en su carácter de adoptante de forma ilegal, ilícita o irregular, a una persona menor de dieciocho años. En todos los casos en que se acredite esta conducta se declarará nula la adopción. No se procederá en contra de quien de buena fe haya recibido a una persona en condición irregular, con el fin de integrar como parte de su núcleo familiar con todas sus consecuencias.

Artículo 28. Se impondrá pena de 4 a 10 años de prisión y de 200 a 2 mil días multa, además de la declaratoria de nulidad de matrimonio, al que:

I. Obligue a contraer matrimonio a una persona, de manera gratuita o a cambio de pago en dinero o en especie entregada a sus padres, tutor, familia o a cualquier otra persona o grupo de personas que ejerza una autoridad sobre ella;
II. Obligue a contraer matrimonio a una persona con el fin de prostituirla o someterla a esclavitud o prácticas similares;
III. Ceda o transmita a una persona a un tercero, a título oneroso, de manera gratuita o de otra manera.

Artículo 29. Se impondrá pena de 20 a 40 años de prisión y de 2 mil a 30 mil días multa, al que realice explotación sexual aprovechándose de la relación matrimonial o concubinato. En todos los casos en que se acredite esta conducta se declarará nulo el matrimonio.

Artículo 41. Las penas previstas en los delitos de este Título se aplicarán también a quien los prepare, promueva, incite, facilite o colabore.

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk for exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protections: General (at Least One)
Social Protections (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protections: Unemployed
Social Protections: Pension
Social Protections: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protections: Poor
Social Protections: Children
Social Protections: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Mexico. If you are a representative of Mexico and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us at info@delta87.org.