Data Dashboards

Morocco
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data is only provided for 2003, and does not cover the full statistical definition. There is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.676 (2018)

Mean School Years: 5.5 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 48.8% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.3% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2011
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 39.8% (2009)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Morocco, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2003. The measure provided for 2003 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but uses a reduced definition. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2003. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Morocco, the latest estimates show that 1.0 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2003. The measure provided for 2003 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but uses a reduced definition. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2003. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Morocco, the latest estimates show that 4.2 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2003. The measure provided for 2003 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work, but uses a reduced definition. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2003. 
 

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Morocco.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Morocco.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Morocco between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Morocco is 0.676. This score indicates that human development is medium. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Morocco over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Morocco showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Morocco.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Legally Defining 8.7
Forced Labour

Code Penal 1962 amend. Loi 27-14, 2016

Article 448.1
On entend par travail forcé au sens de la présente loi tout travail au service exigé d’une personne sous la menace et pour l’exécution duquel elle ne s’est pas portée volontaire. Ne relèvent pas de la notion de travail forcé les travaux exigés pour l’exécution d’un service militaire obligatoire, des travaux exigés en conséquence d’une condamnation judiciaire ou tout travail ou service exigé en cas de déclaration de l’état d’urgence.

Code du travail, 2003

Article 10
Il est interdit de réquisitionner les salariés pour exécuter un travail forcé ou contre leur gré.

Loi n° 19-12 du 10 août 2016 fixant les conditions de travail et d’emploi des travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques.

Article 7
Il est interdit de requisitionner la travailleuse ou le travailleur domestique a executer un travail force ou contre son gre.

Child Labour

Code du travail, 2003

Article 143
Les mineurs ne peuvent être employés ni être admis dans les entreprises ou chez les employeurs avant l’âge de quinze ans révolus.

Loi n° 19-12 du 10 août 2016 fixant les conditions de travail et d’emploi des travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques.

Article 6
L’age minimum d’admission a l’emploi acomme travailleuses ou travailleurs domestiques est fixe a 18 ans.
Toutefois, et durant une periode transitoire de cinq ans a partir de la date d’entree en vigueur de la presente loi, peuvent etre employees, des personnes agees entre 16 et 18 ans en tant que travailleuses ou travaillleurs domestiques a condition, d’obtenir une autorisation ecrite de leurs tuteurs dont la signature est legalisee, aux fins de signer le contrat de travail les concernant.
Les travailleuses et les travailleurs domestqiues ages entre 16 et 18 ans doivent etre, obligatoirement soumis a un examen medical tous les six mois a la charge de l’employeur.
Il est interdit d’occuper les travailleuses et les travailleurs domestiques cites dans l’alinea preendent pendant la nuit. Il est aussi interdit de les employer dans des travaux en haurteur non securises, dans le port des charges lourdes, dans l’utilisation des equipments, des outils et des produits dangereux, et dans tous les travaux qui presentent un danger manifeste sur leur sante ou leur secuirte ou leur moralite ou qui peuvent porter atteinte aux bonnes moeurs.
La liste des travaux dans lesquels il est interdit d’emplyoer les travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques ages entre 16 et 18 ans peut etre completee par voie reglementaire

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Code du travail, 2003

Article 147
Il est interdit à toute personne de faire exécuter par des mineurs de moins de 18 ans des tours de force périlleux, des exercices d’acrobatie, de contorsion ou de leur confier des travaux comportant des risques sur leur vie, leur santé ou leur moralité.
Il est également interdit à toute personne pratiquant les professions d’acrobate, saltimbanque, montreur d’animaux, directeur de cirque ou d’attractions foraines, d’employer dans ses représentations des mineurs âgés de moins de 16 ans.

Decret 2-10-83, 2010

La Liste des travaux auxquels il est interdit d’occuper certaines categories de personnes

Decret 2-17-356, 2017

Completant la liste des travaux dans lesquels il est interdit d’employer les travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques ages entre 16 et 18 ans

Human Trafficking

Code Penal 1962 amend. Loi 27-14, 2016

Article 448.1
On entend par traite des êtres humains, le fait de recruter une personne, de l’entraîner, de la transporter, de la transférer, de l’héberger, de l’accueillir ou le fait de servir d’intermédiaire à cet effet, par la menace de recours à la force, le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, d’enlèvement, de fraude, de tromperie ou d’abus d’autorité, de fonction ou de pouvoir ou l’exploitation d’une situation de vulnérabilité, de besoin ou de précarité, ou par le fait de donner ou de percevoir des sommes d’argent ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre personne aux fins d’exploitation.
Il n’est pas nécessaire qu’il soit fait appel à l’un des moyens prévus au premier alinéa ci-dessus pour que l’on considère que le crime de la traite des êtres humains est commis à l’égard des enfants âgés de moins de 18 ans, dès lors qu’il s’avère que le but poursuivi est l’exploitation desdits enfants.

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1957

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1966

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2000 (minimum age specified: 15 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Definitive Signature 1959

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1959

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Accession 2011

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1993

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratified 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2001

National Action Plans, National Strategies

MSWFSD’s Integrated Public Policy on the Protection of Children in Morocco (PPIPEM)

Promotes an interdisciplinary approach to respond to child exploitation and other issues. In 2017, conducted an informational workshop on program activities and training on social standards for implementing partners; developed terms of reference for technical support to promote good parenting; and developed terms of reference to raise awareness of the 2016 Law on Setting Up Employment Conditions of Domestic Workers, specifically the implications for domestic workers between ages 16 and 18.

Plan d’action Nationale d’enfance 2006-2015

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Code Penal 1962 amend. Loi 27-14, 2016

Article 448.14
La victime de la traite des êtres humains n’est pas tenue responsable pénalement ou civilement de tout acte commis sous la menace, lorsque cet acte est lié directement au fait qu’elle est personnellement victime de la traite des êtres humains, à moins qu’elle n’ait commis une infraction de sa propre volonté sans qu’elle soit sous la menace.

Policies for Assistance, general

Code de Procedure Penal, 1959

De la protection des enfants victimes de crimes ou de délits
Article 566
Lorsqu’un crime ou un délit a été commis sur la personne d’un mineur de 16 ans, le juge des mineurs peut, soit sur les réquisitions du ministère public, soit d’office mais après avis donné au parquet, décider par simple ordonnance que le mineur victime de l’infraction sera jusqu’à jugement définitif de ce crime ou de ce délit, soit placé chez un particulier digne de confiance, ou dans un établissement ou une oeuvre privée, soit confié au service public chargé de l’assistance.
Cette décision n’est soumise à aucune voie de recours.

Article 567
En cas de condamnation prononcée pour crime ou délit sur la personne d’un mineur, le ministère public a la faculté, s’il lui apparaît que l’intérêt du mineur le justifie, de saisir le tribunal des mineurs, lequel ordonne toutes mesures de protection.

Penalties
Penalties, Human Trafficking

Code Penal 1962 amend. Loi 27-14, 2016

Article 448.2
Sans préjudice de dispositions pénales plus sévères, est puni de l’emprisonnement de cinq ans à dix ans et d’une amende de 10.000 à 500.000 dirhams quiconque commet l’infraction de traite des êtres humains.

Article 448.3
Sans préjudice de dispositions pénales plus sévères, la peine prononcée pour la traite des êtres humains est portée à l’emprisonnement de 10 ans à 20 ans et à une amende de 100.000 à 1.000.000 de dirhams dans les cas suivants :

1-lorsque l’infraction est commise sous la menace de mort, de voies de fait, de torture, de séquestration ou de diffamation ;
2-lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction était porteur d’une arme apparente ou cachée ;
3-lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est un fractionnaire public qui abuse de l’autorité qui lui confère sa fonction pour commettre l’infraction ou en faciliter la commission ;
4-lorsque la victime a été atteinte d’une infirmité permanente, d’une maladie organique, psychique ou mentale incurable, du fait de l’exploitation dont elle a fait l’objet au titre de l’infraction de la traite des êtres humains ;
5-lorsque l’infraction est commise par deux ou plusieurs personnes comme auteurs, coauteurs ou complices ;
6- lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction a pris l’habitude de la commettre ;
7-lorsque l’infraction est commise à l’encontre de plusieurs personnes en réunion.

Article 448.4
L’infraction de la traite des êtres humains est punie de l’emprisonnement de 20 ans à 30 ans et d’une amende de 200.000 à 2.000.000 de dirhams dans les cas suivants :

1-Lorsque l’infraction a été commise à l’encontre d’un mineur de moins de dix huit ans ;
2-Lorsque l’infraction est commise à l’égard d’une personne dans une situation difficile du fait de son âge, d’une maladie, d’un handicap ou d’une faiblesse physique ou psychique ou à l’égard d’une femme enceinte que sa grossesse soit, apparente ou connue de son coupable ;
3-Lorsque l’auteur de l’infraction est le conjoint de la victime, l’un de ses ascendants ou descendants, son tuteur, son kafil, chargé de veiller sur elle ou ayant autorité sur elle.

Article 448.5
Sans préjudice des dispositions pénales plus sévères, l’infraction de traite des êtres humains est punie de l’emprisonnement de 20 à 30 ans et d’une amende de 1.000.000 à 6.000.000 de dirhams, lorsqu’elle est commise en bande organisée ou à l’échelle transnationale, ou si le crime a entraîné la mort de la victime.
La peine prévue au premier alinéa ci-dessus est portée à la réclusion à perpétuité si l’infraction est commise par la torture ou des actes de barbarie.

Article 448.6
Est puni d’une amende de 1.000.000 à 10.000.000 de dirhams toute personne morale qui commet le crime de traite des êtres humains sans préjudice des sanctions applicables à la personne physique qui la représente, l’administre ou travaille pour son compte.
En outre, le tribunal doit ordonner la dissolution de la personne morale et l’application des mesures de sûreté énoncées à l’article 62 de la présente loi.

Article 448.7
Est puni de l’emprisonnement d’un an à cinq ans et d’une amende de 5.000 à 50.000 dirhams, quiconque a pris connaissance qu’une personne a commis ou a commencé à commettre une infraction de traite des êtres humains sans la dénoncer auprès des autorités compétentes.
Toutefois, bénéfice d’une excuse absolutoire de peine la personne qui s’abstient de dénoncer l’auteur de l’infraction lorsque cette personne est le conjoint de l’auteur de l’infraction, ou l’un de ses ascendants ou descendants.

Article 448.8
Est puni de l’emprisonnement d’un an à cinq ans et d’une amende de 5.000 à 50.000 dirhams quiconque recourt à la force, menace d’y recourir ou promet d’accorder un avantage afin d’empêcher une personne d’apporter son témoignage ou de produire des preuves, de l’inciter à faire un faux témoignage, à s’abstenir de présenter des preuves, ou à présenter de fausses déclarations ou preuves se rapportant à l’infraction de la traite des êtres humains devant toute autorité compétente et au cours des différentes étapes du procès y afférent.

Article 448.9
Est puni de l’emprisonnement d’un an à cinq ans et d’une amende de 5.000 à 50.000 dirhams quiconque met intentionnellement en danger la vie d’une victime de la traite des êtres humains ou un témoin en révélant délibérément son identité ou son lieu de résidence ou en entravant les mesures de protection prises en sa faveur.
On entend par victime de la traire des êtres humains toute personne physique, qu’elle soit marocaine ou étrangère, qui subit un préjudice matériel ou moral avéré résultant directement de la traite des êtres humains, conformément à la définition donné à la traite des êtres humains qui est prévue par la présente loi.

Article 448.10
Est puni de l’emprisonnement d’un an à cinq ans et d’une amende de 5.000 à 50.000 dirhams quiconque, tout en sachant sciemment qu’il s’agit de l’infraction de traite des êtres humains, bénéficie d’un service, d’un avantage ou d’un travail de la part d’une victime de la traite des êtres humains.
La peine est portée au double si la victime de la traite des êtres humains est une personne mineure âgée de moins de 18 ans.

Article 448.11
La tentative de commettre les infractions prévues par la présente section est passible de la même peine prévue pour le crime consommé.

Article 448.12
Bénéficie d’une excuse absolutoire des peines prévues à la présente section celui des coupables qui a pris l’initiative de porter à la connaissance des autorités compétentes les éléments d’information dont il dispose en ce qui concerne l’infraction de la traite des êtres humains, et ce avant toute exécution ou commencement d’exécution de cette infraction ou en permettant d’en empêcher la consommation.
En cas de dénonciation de l’infraction, le coupable dénonciateur peut bénéficier d’une excuse absolutoire de la peine ou de son atténuation, selon les circonstances de dénonciation, s’il permet aux autorités compétentes, au cours de l’instruction, de procéder à l’arrestation des autres coupables. Ces dispositions ne s’appliquent pas aux infractions entraînant la mort, une infirmité permanente ou une maladie organique, psychique ou mentale incurable de la victime.

Article 448.13
Sous réserve des droits des tiers de bonne foi, sont confisqués au profit du Trésor les fonds et les objets qui ont servi ou devaient servir à la commission de l’infraction de la traite des êtres humains, ou qui sont le produit de la commission de cette infraction.
En outre, il y a lieu d’ordonner la publication de la décision judiciaire portant condamnation, de l’afficher ou de la diffuser par les moyens audio-visuels.

Penalties, Child Labour

Code Penal 1962 amend. Loi 27-14, 2016

Article 328
Sont punis de la peine prévue à l’article précédent, ceux qui, soit ouvertement, soit sous l’apparence d’une profession, emploient à la mendicité des enfants âgés de moins de treize ans.

Article 330
Le père, la mère, le tuteur testamentaire, le tuteur datif, le kafil ou l’employeur et généralement toute personne ayant autorité sur un enfant ou qui en assure la protection qui livre, même gratuitement l’enfant, le pupille, l’enfant abandonné soumis à la kafala ou l’apprenti âgé de moins de dix-huit ans à un vagabond ou à un ou plusieurs individus faisant métier de la mendicité, ou à plusieurs vagabonds est puni de l’emprisonnement de six mois à deux ans.
La même peine est applicable à quiconque livre ou fait livrer l’enfant, le pupille, l’enfant soumis à la kafala ou l’apprenti, âgés de moins de dix-huit ans, à un ou plusieurs mendiants ou à un ou plusieurs vagabonds, ou a déterminé ce mineur à quitter le domicile de ses parents, tuteur testamentaire, tuteur datif, kafil, patron ou celui de la personne qui assure sa protection, pour suivre un ou plusieurs mendiants ou un ou plusieurs vagabonds.

Article 467-1200
Est punie de l’emprisonnement de deux à dix ans et d’une amende de cinq mille à deux millions de dirhams toute personne qui vend ou acquiert un enfant de moins de dix-huit ans.
On entend par vente d’enfants tout acte ou toute transaction faisant intervenir le transfert d’un enfant d’une ou plusieurs personnes à une ou plusieurs autres personnes moyennant contrepartie de quelque nature que ce soit.
La peine prévue au 1er alinéa du présent article est applicable à quiconque :

– provoque les parents ou l’un d’entre eux, le kafil, le tuteur testamentaire, le tuteur datif, la personne ayant une autorité sur lui ou la personne chargée de sa protection à vendre un enfant de moins de dix- huit ans, porte son assistance à ladite vente ou la facilite ;
– fait office d’intermédiaire, facilite ou porte assistance à la vente ou à l’achat, par quelque moyen que ce soit d’un enfant de moins de dix-huit ans.

La tentative de ces actes est réprimée de la même peine que celle prévue pour l’infraction consommée.
Le jugement peut prononcer à l’encontre du condamné, la privation d’un ou de plusieurs droits prévus à l’article 40 et l’interdiction de résidence de cinq à dix ans.

Article 467- 2
Sans préjudice des peines plus graves, est puni de l’emprisonnement d’un an à trois ans et d’une amende de cinq mille à vingt mille dirhams, quiconque exploite un enfant de moins de quinze ans pour l’exercice d’un travail forcé, fait office d’intermédiaire, ou provoque cette exploitation.
On entend par travail forcé, au sens de l’alinéa précédent, le fait de contraindre un enfant à exercer un travail interdit par la loi ou à effectuer un travail préjudiciable à sa santé, à sa sûreté, à ses mœurs ou à sa formation.

Article 467- 3
Quiconque tente de commettre les actes prévus aux articles 467-1 et 467-2 est puni de la même peine prévue pour l’infraction consommée.

Article 467- 4
Les dispositions de l’article 464 du présent code sont applicables aux auteurs des infractions réprimées dans les articles 467-1 à 467-3.

Code du travail, 2003

Article 150
Sont punis d’une amende de 2.000 à 5.000 dirhams :
le défaut de détention de l’autorisation prévue à l’article 145 ; le non- respect des dispositions de l’article 146 ;
le défaut de détention ou de production par les personnes visées à l’article 148 des pièces justificatives de l’identité des salariés mineurs placés sous leur conduite.
Sont punies d’une amende de 300 à 500 dirhams les infractions aux dispositions de l’article 147.
L’amende est appliquée autant de fois qu’il y a de salariés mineurs à l’égard desquels les dispositions de l’article 147 n’ont pas été observées, sans toutefois que le total des amendes dépasse le montant de 20.000 dirhams.

Article 151
Est punie d’une amende de 25.000 à 30.000 dirhams l’infraction aux dispositions de l’article 143.
La récidive est passible d’une amende portée au double et d’un emprisonnement de 6 jours à 3 mois, ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement

Loi n° 19-12 du 10 août 2016 fixant les conditions de travail et d’emploi des travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques.

Article 23
Est punie d’une amende de 25.000 a 30.000 dirhams:

-toute personne qui emploie, durant la période transitoire prévue par l’alinéa deux de l’article 6 ci-dessus, une travailleuse ou un travailleur domestique âgé de moins de 16 ans;
-toute personne qui emploie une travailleuse ou un travaileur domestique âgé de moins de 18 ans après expiration de la période transitoire prévue par l’alinéa deux de l’article 6 ci-dessus;
-toute personne qui emploie une travaileuse ou un travailleur domestique âgé entre 16 et 18 ans sans autorisation de son tuteur;
-toute personne physique qui fait de l’intermédiation, moyennat rémunération, pour l’emploi des travailleuses ou des travailleurs domestiques;
-toute personne qui emploie une travailleuse ou un travailleur domestique contrairement aux dispositions de l’alinéa trois de l’article 6 ci-dessus;
-toute personne qui emploie une travailleuse ou un travailleur dmoestqiue contre son gré

En cas de récidive, l’auteur des infractions susmentionnées sera puni d’une amende portée au double et d’un emprisonnement d’un à 3 mois de l’une de ces deux peines seulement.

Penalties, Forced Labour

Code du travail, 2003

Article 546
Quiconque aura fait obstacle à l’application des dispositions de la présente loi ou des textes réglementaires pris pour son application, en mettant les agents chargés de l’inspection du travail dans l’impossibilité d’exercer leurs fonctions, est puni d’une amende de 25.000 à 30.000 dirhams.
En cas de récidive, l’amende prévue ci-dessus est portée au double.

Article 548
Est pénalement responsable des infractions aux dispositions de la présente loi et des textes réglementaires pris pour son application, tout employeur, directeur ou chef au sens de l’article 7 ci-dessus ayant, dans l’établissement, par délégation de l’employeur, la compétence et l’autorité suffisantes pour obtenir des salariés placés sous sa surveillance l’obéissance nécessaire au respect des dispositions législatives et réglementaires.
L’employeur est civilement responsable des condamnations aux frais et dommages-intérêts infligées à ses directeurs, gérants ou préposés.

Loi n° 19-12 du 10 août 2016 fixant les conditions de travail et d’emploi des travailleuses et travailleurs domestiques.

Article 23
Est punie d’une amende de 25.000 a 30.000 dirhams:

-toute personne physique qui fait de l’intermédiation, moyennat rémunération, pour l’emploi des travailleuses ou des travailleurs domestiques;
-toute personne qui emploie une travailleuse ou un travailleur dmoestqiue contre son gré

En cas de récidive, l’auteur des infractions susmentionnées sera puni d’une amende portée au double et d’un emprisonnement d’un à 3 mois de l’une de ces deux peines seulement.

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Morocco. If you are a representative of Morocco and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.