Data Dashboards

Nauru
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Due to lack of nationally representative data, there is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

No data available

Data Availability
  • Child labour: No ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: No data available

Mean School Years: No data available

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: No data available

Working Poverty Rate: No data available

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Not Ratified
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2012
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 56.5% (2010)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

No nationally representative data is available on child labour prevalence in Nauru.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on ILO-SIMPOC methods and guidelines for defining, measuring and collecting data on child labour.

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Nauru.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Nauru.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Nauru.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Constitution, 1968

“Protection from forced labour
6.-(1.) No person shall be required to perform forced labour.
(2.) For the purposes of this Article, “”forced labour”” does not include-

(a) labour required by the sentence or order of a court;
(b) labour required of a person while he is lawfully detained, being labour that, though not required by the sentence or order of a court, is reasonably necessary for the purposes of hygiene or for the maintenance of the place at which he is detained;
(c) labour required of a member of a disciplined force in pursuance of his duties as such a member; or
(d) labour reasonably required as part of reasonable and normal communal or other civic obligations.”

Crimes Act, 2016

“DIVISION 14.1 – SLAVERY
257 Dealing with person as a commodity
(2) In this section:
‘forced labour’ means the status or condition of a person who provides labour or personal services in circumstances in which a reasonable person in the same circumstances would not consider the person to be free to: (a) stop providing the labour or services; or (b) leave the place where the labour or services are provided, even if escape from the place is practically possible or the person has previously attempted escaping.”

Child Labour

Education Act, 2011

“17 Employment of school-age children
A person must not employ a school-age child during school hours.
Penalty: $1,000.
Subsection (1) does not apply to a person who employs a child:

(a) who is registered for home education; or
(b) in respect of whom a certificate of exemption has been issued; or
(c) who is not permitted to attend school under section 15.

An offence against this section is a strict liability offence.”

Child Protection and Welfare Act, 2016

“53 Child’s employer to provide proof of child’s age
(1) A person who employs a child must provide proof of the child’s age if required to do so by an authorised officer.
(2) If a child has been employed by reason of any law which permits the employment of a person who is under 18 years of age, it is the responsibility of the employer to ensure that the consent of a parent has been obtained, and the employer must produce evidence of such consent if requested to do so by an authorised officer.”

Trafficking in Persons

Immigration Act, 2014

“14 Definitions
In this Part, unless the context otherwise requires:
‘child’ means a person under the age of 18 years;
‘exploitation’ includes forced labour or service, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude, removal of organs, and sexual servitude;
‘trafficking in persons’ means the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a person for the purpose of exploitation;”

Slavery

Crimes Act, 2016

“DIVISION 14.1 – SLAVERY
257 Dealing with person as a commodity
(2) In this section:
‘slave’ means a person:

(a) over whom another person claims, and purports to exercise, a right of ownership; or
(b) in debt-bondage; or
(c) in forced labour; or
(d) in serfdom.”

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Education Act, 2011

“17 Employment of school-age children
A person must not employ a school-age child during school hours.
Penalty: $1,000.
Subsection (1) does not apply to a person who employs a child:

(a) who is registered for home education; or
(b) in respect of whom a certificate of exemption has been issued; or
(c) who is not permitted to attend school under section 15.

An offence against this section is a strict liability offence.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Immigration Act, 2014

“16 Offence of trafficking in persons
A person who engages in trafficking in a person knowing that the person’s entry into Nauru or any other country was arranged by unlawful means commits an offence.
17 Offence of trafficking in children
A person who engages in trafficking in a person who is a child, regardless of whether the child’s entry into Nauru or any other country was arranged, commits an offence.”

“18 Exploitation of persons not legally entitled to work
(1) An employer who, while allowing an unlawful employee to undertake employment in the employer’s service, takes an action with the intention of preventing or hindering the employee from:

(a) leaving Nauru;
(b) ascertaining or seeking that person’s entitlement under the law of Nauru; or
(c) disclosing to any person the circumstances of that person’s employment by the employer;
commits an offence.

(2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), the following are examples of actions of the kind mentioned in that subsection:

(a) taking or retaining possession or control of a person’s passport, any other travel or identity documents, or travel tickets;
(b) preventing or hindering a person from:

(i) having access to a telephone or any other means of telecommunication available;
(ii) using a telephone or any other means of telecommunication available;
(iii) using a telephone or any other means of telecommunication privately;
(iv) leaving premises; or
(v) leaving premises unaccompanied.

27 Penalty
A person convicted of an offence against this Part is liable to a fine not exceeding $50,000.”

Penalties, Slavery

Crimes Act, 2016

“DIVISION 14.1 – SLAVERY

257 Dealing with person as a commodity
(1) A person commits an offence if the person:

(a) deals with a person (the ‘affected person’) as, or for the purpose of making the affected person, a slave; or
(b) permits another person to deal with a person (the ‘affected person’) as, or for the purpose of making the affected person, a slave; or
(c) induces a person (the ‘affected person’) to deal with:

(i) themself as, or for the purpose of making the affected person, a slave; or
(ii) any other person as, or for the purpose of making the affected person, a slave; or
(d) in exchange for material benefit:
(i) causes a person, without the person’s consent, to marry another person; or
(ii) gives a person, without the person’s consent, to another person under an inheritance or otherwise; or

(e) permits a child, for whom the person is a parent or guardian, to be put under the care or control of another person so that the child may be exploited; or
(f) deals with transport for the purpose of any activity mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (e).
Penalty: 25 years imprisonment.

(2) In this section:
‘deal’ with:

(a) a person includes:

(i) sell, buy, transfer, barter, let, hire, employ or otherwise use the person; or
(ii) detain, take, receive, transport or import the person; and

(b) transport includes build, fit out, sell, buy, transfer, let, hire, use, operate, navigate or work on the transport.
‘debt-bondage’ means the status or condition arising from a person promising their personal services, or the personal services of another person under the person’s care or control, as security for a debt if:

(a) the value of the services, as reasonably assessed, is not applied to the discharge of the debt; or
(b) the period in which the services are to be provided, and the nature of the services, are not limited or defined.
‘forced labour’ means the status or condition of a person who provides labour or personal services in circumstances in which a reasonable person in the same circumstances would not consider the person to be free to:

(a) stop providing the labour or services; or
(b) leave the place where the labour or services are provided, even if escape from the place is practically possible or the person has previously attempted escaping.
‘serfdom’ means the status or condition of a person who is by law, custom or agreement:

(a) required to live and work on land belonging to another person; and
(b) required to provide some determined service to the other person; and
(c) not free to change that status or condition.
‘slave’ means a person:

(a) over whom another person claims, and purports to exercise, a right of ownership; or
(b) in debt-bondage; or
(c) in forced labour; or
(d) in serfdom.
‘transport’ means a ship, aircraft or any other form of transporting a person.”

Penalties, General

Child Protection and Welfare Act, 2016

“51 Prohibition on the sale of children
(1)No child in Nauru may be bought or sold, and any contract, agreement or arrangement purporting to be the basis of such a sale is void and of no legal effect.
(2)A person commits an offence and is liable to a fine not exceeding $100,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 15 years, or both if the person:

(a) enters in to any arrangement for the sale or purchase of a child in Nauru;
(b) offers any money or valuable consideration to the parent or guardian of a child in Nauru in order to purchase the child, or to obtain or assume any parental status or authority over the child;
(c) facilitates the sale or purchase of a child in Nauru in any way.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Nauru. If you are a representative of Nauru and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.