Data Dashboards

Nicaragua
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2000 and 2012 increased by 103%.

+103%

2000 – 2012

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.651 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.8 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 39.4% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 5.4% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 23.7% (2011)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Nicaragua, the percentage of child labourers has increased overall from 2000 to 2012.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Nicaragua, the latest estimates show that 32.1 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The number is higher than in 2010, and has increased from 8.3 percent in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Nicaragua, the latest estimates show that 39.7 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The percentage is higher than in 2010, and has increased from 27.4 percent in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2012 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Nicaragua was 16.0 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 19.5 hours in 2010.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2012, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 26.2 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2010, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 30.1. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2012.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 13.8 hours per week according to the 2001 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2000, which found that children aged 5-14 in Nicaragua worked an average of 14.5 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2001. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Nicaragua is from 2012. By the 2012 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Other Services sector, the Manufacturing sector, and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Nicaragua.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Nicaragua.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Nicaragua between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Nicaragua is 0.651. This score indicates that human development is medium. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Nicaragua over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Nicaragua showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Nicaragua.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Ley 896 contra la Trata de Personas, 2015

“Artículo 6 Conceptos básicos
Para los efectos de aplicación de la presente Ley se establecen los conceptos básicos siguientes:
19) Trabajo forzado: Es el trabajo o servicios exigidos a una persona bajo cualquier amenaza, coacción o violencia en el desempeño involuntario de una labor, sea a través de la acumulación de sumas adeudadas, retención de documentos de identidad o amenaza de denuncia ante las autoridades de migración y extranjería, entre otros.”

Child Labour

Codigo de Trabajo, 1996 amend. Ley 474, 2003

Arto.130. Se considera adolescente trabajador a los y las comprendidas en edades de 14 a 18 años no cumplidos, que mediante remuneración económica realizan actividades productivas o presten servicios de orden material, intelectual u otros, de manera permanente o temporal.

Arto. 131. La edad mínima para trabajar mediante remuneración laboral es de 14 años, en consecuencia se prohíbe el trabajo a menores de esa edad.
A los y las adolescentes que trabajan se les reconocerá capacidad jurídica para la celebracion de contratos de trabajo a partir de los dieceiséis años de edad.
Los y las adolescentes comprendidos entre las edades de 14 a 16 años no cumplidos, podran celebrar contratos de trabajo con el permiso de sus padres o representante legal, bajo la supervisión del Ministerio del Trabajo. Correspondera a la Inspectoría General del Trabajo, a solicitud de parte o de oficio, conocer y sancionar denuncias sobre la violación a esta disposición.

Codigo de Trabajo, 1996

Artículo 22. Son capaces para contratar en materia laboral, los mayores de 16 años de edad.

Constitucion, 1987

ARTÍCULO 84.- Se prohíbe el trabajo de los menores, en labores que puedan afectar su desarrollo normal o su ciclo de instrucción obligatoria. Se protegerá a los niños y adolescentes contra cualquier clase de explotación económica y social.

Ley núm. 287 por la que se dicta el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 1998

Arto. 73. Se prohíbe emplear a niños, niñas y adolescentes en cualquier trabajo. Las empresas y las personas naturales o jurídicas, no podrán contratar a menores de 14 años.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Acuerdo Ministerial JCHG-08-06-10 Sobre Prohibicion de Trabajos Peligrosos para Personas Adolescentes y Listado de Trabajos Peligrosos, 2010

“Arto. 1.- Se prohíbe la realización de trabajos peligrosos para todas las personas menores de 18 años de edad. Las Inspectorías Departamentales del Trabajo quedan facultadas para conocer de las violaciones a esta disposición y sancionar conforme lo dispuesto en el Arto. 6 de la Ley 474.

Arto. 2.- En caso de dudas en la aplicación o interpretación del presente acuerdo, se aplicará o interpretará lo que más beneficie a la persona adolescente trabajadora, en base al Principio Fundamental VIII del Código del Trabajo.

Arto. 3.- La presente actualización del listado de trabajos peligrosos es aplicable a todos los empleadores del sector formal o informal.”

Codigo de Trabajo, 1996 amend. Ley 474, 2003

Arto 133. Se prohíbe el desempeño de los y las adolescentes en trabajos que por su naturaleza, o por las condiciones en que se realiza dañe su salud física, psíquica, condición moral y espiritual, les impida su educación, unidad familiar y desarrollo integral, tales como:…

Ley núm. 287 por la que se dicta el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 1998

“Arto. 5. Ninguna niña, niño o adolescente, será objeto de cualquier forma de discriminación, explotación, traslado ilícito dentro o fuera del país, violencia, abuso o maltrato físico, psíquico y sexual, tratamiento inhumano, aterrorizador, humillante, opresivo, trato cruel, atentado o negligencia, por acción u omisión a sus derechos y libertades.
Es deber de toda persona velar por la dignidad de la niña, niño o adolescente, poniéndolo a salvo de cualquiera de las situaciones anteriormente señaladas.
La niña, niño y adolescente tiene derecho a la protección de la Ley contra esas injerencias o ataques y los que los realizaren incurrirán en responsabilidad penal y civil.”

Arto. 74. Los adolescentes no podrán efectuar ningún tipo de trabajo en lugares insalubres y de riesgo a su vida, salud, integridad física, psíquica o moral, tales como el trabajo en minas, subterráneos, basureros, centros nocturnos de diversión, los que impliquen manipulación de objetos y sustancias tóxicas, psicotrópicas y los de jornada nocturna en general.

Human Trafficking

Ley 896 contra la Trata de Personas, 2015

“Artículo 6 Conceptos básicos
Para los efectos de aplicación de la presente Ley se establecen los conceptos básicos siguientes:
18) Trata de personas: Acto cometido por personas, grupo de personas u organizaciones criminales que lesionan los derechos humanos consagrados en la Constitución Política, Acuerdo, Convenios y Tratados Internacionales suscritos y ratificados por Nicaragua y lo dispuesto por la presente Ley, valiéndose de cualquier medio para fines de explotación determinados por la ley;”

Slavery

Constitucion, 1987

ARTÍCULO 40.- Nadie será sometido a servidumbre. La esclavitud y la trata de cualquier naturaleza, están prohibidas en todas sus formas.

Ley 896 contra la Trata de Personas, 2015

“Artículo 6 Conceptos básicos
Para los efectos de aplicación de la presente Ley se establecen los conceptos básicos siguientes:
8) Esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud: La esclavitud es el estado o condición de una persona sobre el cual se ejercen todos o parte de los atributos del derecho de propiedad y en la que es sometida su voluntad y libertad. Las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud incluyen: esclavitud por razón de deuda, servidumbre, formas serviles de matrimonio, y explotación de niños, niñas y adolescentes, de conformidad a la Convención Suplementaria Sobre la Abolición de la Esclavitud,
Trata de Esclavos y las Instituciones y Prácticas Análogas a la Esclavitud y otros instrumentos jurídicos de derechos humanos;”

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1934

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1967

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 1981 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2000

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Definitive signature 1986

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1986

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Accession 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Accession 2005

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Accession 2004

National Action Plans, National Strategies

Roadmap for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Sets the goal of eliminating the worst forms of child labor by 2016 and all forms of child labor by 2020.

Good Government Plan

Sets development goals for government ministries, including MITRAB, MINED, and MINSA. Prioritizes human trafficking investigations; aims to protect children from commercial sexual exploitation; and commits to training teachers, creating 1,000 primary school teaching positions, and increasing access to education, including for indigenous and Afro-descendant children.

National Action Plan on Human Trafficking 2018-2022

A four-pronged approach to improve awareness, capacity building, trainings, victim protection, and monitoring. The Supreme Court of Justice oversaw the design and implementation of the plan. IOM collaborated by editing the document and provided training for government officials.

National Strategy for the Comprehensive Care and Assistance to Victims of Human Trafficking

Describes the process for identifying and assisting victims.

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, General

Decreto núm. 20-2006 por el que se dicta la política de protección especial a los niños, niñas y adolescentes.

Ley núm. 287 por la que se dicta el Código de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, 1998

Ley 406 de Codigo Procesal Penal, 2001

Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ley 896 contra la Trata de Personas, 2015

“Artículo 6 Conceptos básicos
Para los efectos de aplicación de la presente Ley se establecen los conceptos básicos siguientes:
2) Asistencia y protección a las víctimas: Es el conjunto de medidas para el apoyo y protección con carácter integral que se le otorga a las personas víctimas desde el momento de su identificación, rescate hasta su reintegración familiar, escolar y social, para su orientación legal, asistencia médica, psicológica, así como la protección para ella y su familia;

12) Protección: Es la intervención de la autoridad competente de forma pronta, integral y efectiva en todos los ámbitos de la vida para garantizar a la víctima el acceso a medidas administrativas o judiciales que eviten la continuidad de la amenaza, restricción o violación de sus derechos y la restitución de estos. Las autoridades bajo su propia responsabilidad, deben iniciar de oficio los procedimientos administrativos y judiciales para garantizar la protección de la víctima;”

“CAPÍTULO IV
De los derechos y medidas de protección de las víctimas

CAPÍTULO V
De la reparación de daños”

“Artículo 45 Protección de víctima, testigos, peritos, peritas y técnicos de investigación
Bajo el principio de máxima protección no se deberá revelar la identidad de las víctimas y personas protegidas, la identidad, datos personales de identificación y ubicación de estos, tampoco deberán ser revelados en el libelo acusatorio, intercambio o ampliación de información y pruebas. Esta información será sustituida por un código alfanumérico.”

Penalties
Penalties, General

Codigo Penal, 2007

“Art. 315
Discriminación, servidumbre, explotación
Quien discrimine en el empleo por razón de nacimiento, nacionalidad, afiliación política, raza, origen étnico, opción sexual, género, religión, opinión, posición económica, discapacidad, condición física, o cualquier otra condición social, será penado con prisión de seis meses a un año y de noventa a ciento cincuenta días multa.
Quien someta, reduzca o mantenga a otra persona en esclavitud o condiciones similares a la esclavitud, trabajo forzoso u obligatorio, régimen de servidumbre o cualquier otra situación en contra de la dignidad humana, en la actividad laboral, será castigado con prisión de cinco a ocho años.
Se impondrá pena de prisión de cinco a ocho años y de ciento cincuenta a trescientos días de multa, a quienes trafiquen a personas, con el fin de someterlas a actividades de explotación laboral, así como el reclutamiento forzado para participar en conflictos armados.
La pena para los delitos señalados en los párrafos anteriores se agravará hasta la mitad del límite máximo del delito de que se trate, cuando sean cometidos:

a) En perjuicio de niños o niñas; o
b) Mediante violencia o intimidación.

Si concurren ambas circunstancias, la pena se agravará hasta las tres cuartas partes del límite máximo del delito respectivo.
Quien contrate para el empleo a una persona menor de dieciocho años fuera de los casos autorizados por la ley con fines de explotación laboral, será sancionado con pena de dos a cuatro años de prisión.”

Penalties, Child Labour

Acuerdo Ministerial JCHG-008-05-07 sobre el cumplimiento de la Ley núm. 474 Ley de Reforma al Título VI, Libro Primero del Código del Trabajo, 2007

*** “Tiene por objeto establecer los mecanismos que aseguren el cumplimiento y aplicación de la Ley núm. 474. Establece que la Dirección General de Inspección del Trabajo estará a cargo de la aplicación de esta normativa y de organizar un sistema de inspección para la prevención del trabajo infantil y supervisión en el cumplimiento de los derechos de los y las adolescentes que trabajan, tanto en el sector formal e informal de la economía.”

Codigo de Trabajo, 1996 amend. Ley 474, 2003

“Arto. 135. Las violaciones de los derechos laborales de los y las adolescentes que trabajan serán sancionadas con multas progresivas que oscilaran de cinco a quince salarios mínimos promedios, que aplicará hasta tres veces la Inspectoría Departamental de Trabajo correspondiente, sin perjuicio de acordar por la reincidencia, la suspensión o cierre temporal deI establecimiento. El valor de estas multas se asignará a la Comisión Nacional para la Erradicación Progresiva del Trabajo Infantil y Protección deI Adolescente Trabajador, sin prejuicio de las reclamaciones laborales que éI o la adolescente o su representante legal puedan presentar antes los juzgados
laborales respectivos.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ley 641 Codigo Penal, 2007 amend. Ley 896 contra la Trata de Personas, 2015

“Artículo 178 Proxenetismo
Será penado de ocho a diez años de prisión y de trescientos a quinientos días multas, en cualquiera de las actividades siguientes:
1) Quien explote la prostitución ajena, o se aproveche o beneficie de la explotación sexual de la misma, mediante cualquier tipo de actividad de carácter sexual o pornográfica, aún con el consentimiento de la persona, para sacar beneficio, ventaja o provecho para sí o para un tercero;

2) Quien mantenga, arriende, administre, dirija, financie, supervise o dirija una casa, local, agencia, o mediante la simulación de cualquier otro establecimiento para explotar la prostitución ajena o sexual de una persona, o el que a sabiendas de ello, llevare a cabo alguna función, principal o subalterna, en el local donde se ejerza la prostitución;

3) Quien realice las acciones de controlar, vigilar, someter a las víctimas, cobrar, recibir o despojar del pago, producto de la explotación.
Artículo 179 Proxenetismo agravado

I. Se aplicará la pena entre diez y doce años de prisión y de quinientos un días a mil días multa en los casos siguientes:

1) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe del delito se valga de una relación de parentesco no comprendida en el numeral anterior o de superioridad, autoridad, dependencia, confianza con la víctima, subordinación o dependencia académica o espiritual;
2) Cuando comparta permanentemente el hogar con la víctima;
3) Cuando medie el engaño, violencia, abuso de autoridad o cualquier forma de intimidación o coerción; y
4) Cuando exista el ánimo de lucro.

II. Se aplicará la pena entre doce y quince años de prisión y multa de mil días multas en los casos siguientes:

1) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe del delito se valga de una relación de familiaridad hasta el cuarto grado de consanguinidad y segundo de afinidad;
2) Cuando la víctima sea niño, niña, adolescente o persona con discapacidad;
3) Cuando a consecuencia del delito de proxenetismo la víctima resulte con un grave daño en la salud física o psicológica o haya adquirido una enfermedad incurable, embarazo, o sea obligada a practicarse aborto; y
4) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe del delito sea servidor o servidora público, o trabaje para organismos internacionales u organismos no gubernamentales, cuyo fin esté relacionado con el tema atención o protección a la niñez, adolescencia y mujer.”

“Artículo 182 Trata de Personas
Comete el delito de trata de personas, quien organice, financie, dirija, promueva, publicite, gestione, induzca, facilite o quien ejecute la captación directa o indirecta, invite, reclute, contrate, transporte, traslade, vigile, entregue, reciba, retenga, oculte, acoja o aloje a alguna persona con cualquiera de los fines de prostitución, explotación sexual, proxenetismo, pornografía infantil, matrimonio servil, forzado o matrimonio simulado, embarazo forzado, explotación laboral, trabajos o servicios forzados, trabajo infantil, esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, servidumbre, tráfico o extracción ilícita de órganos, tejidos, células o fluidos humanos o cualquiera de sus componentes, experimentación biomédicas clínica o farmacológica ilícitas, participación en actividades de criminalidad organizada, utilización de menores en actividades delictivas, mendicidad o adopción irregular, para que dichos fines sean ejercidos dentro o fuera del territorio nacional.
Se aplicará la pena de diez a quince años de prisión y mil días multa, la cancelación de licencia comercial, clausura definitiva del local y el decomiso de los bienes muebles e inmuebles utilizados y los recursos económicos y financieros obtenidos.
En ningún caso el consentimiento de la víctima eximirá ni atenuará la responsabilidad penal de las personas que incurran en la comisión del delito de trata de personas.”

“Artículo 182 bis Agravantes del delito de trata de personas
I. Se impondrá la pena de dieciséis a dieciocho años y multa de mil días en los casos siguientes:

1) Cuando el delito de trata de personas se cometa por medio de amenazas, intimidación, secuestro, chantaje, uso de fuerza u otras formas de coacción; y
2) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe, cometa el delito en ejercicio de poder o valiéndose de una situación de vulnerabilidad de la víctima, cuando recurra al fraude, al engaño, a ofrecimiento de trabajo o cualquier beneficio, o a la concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona, que tenga autoridad sobre otra.

II. Se impondrá la pena de diecinueve a veinte años y multa de mil días en los casos en que:

1) La víctima sea una persona niña, niño, adolescente o mayor de sesenta años de edad; o se trate de persona proveniente de los pueblos originarios o afrodescendientes, persona con discapacidad, o el hecho fuere cometido por familiar, tutor o tutora, encargado o encargada de la educación, guarda o custodia, guía espiritual, lideresa o líder religioso o que comparta permanentemente el hogar de la víctima, o medie una relación de confianza;
2) Quien sustraiga, ofrezca, entregue, transfiera, venda, acepte, adquiera o posea, a un niño, niña o adolescente, alterando o no la filiación, medie o no pago, recompensa o beneficio, con cualquiera de los fines de explotación dispuestos en el delito de trata de personas;
3) Cuando las víctimas en un mismo hecho sean dos o más personas;
4) Cuando los fines de explotación sean dos o más de los previstos en este delito;
5) Cuando a consecuencia del delito de trata de personas, se ponga en peligro la vida de la víctima o ésta resulte con daño grave, en la salud física o psicológica, o haya adquirido una enfermedad grave o incurable, o cuando resulte embarazada o sea obligada a practicarse aborto;
6) Cuando la víctima sea obligada o inducida a consumir drogas o resulte en una condición de adicción;
7) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe del delito de trata de personas haya sido condenado por la comisión del mismo delito en el extranjero; y
8) Cuando la persona autora o partícipe del delito sea servidor o servidora pública o trabaje para organismos internacionales u organismos no gubernamentales cuyo fin esté relacionado con el tema atención o protección a la niñez, adolescencia y mujer.

Si concurren dos o más de las circunstancias previstas en este artículo se aplicará la pena máxima.
Si los fines de explotación se hubieren alcanzado por la misma persona, se aplicará el concurso que corresponda de conformidad al Código Procesal Penal de la República de Nicaragua.
A las personas que hayan sido condenadas por la comisión del delito de trata de personas se les impondrá la pena de inhabilitación especial por el mismo periodo de la condena para el ejercicio de la profesión, actividad u oficio relacionado con la conducta.”

“Artículo 182 ter Proposición, conspiración y provocación
La provocación, conspiración o proposición para cometer el delito de trata de personas, serán sancionadas con una pena de cinco a diez años de prisión.”

“Artículo 182 quater Disposiciones comunes al delito de proxenetismo y trata de personas Quien a sabiendas que una persona se encuentra bajo una situación de explotación sexual, proxenetismo o trata de personas, tuviere relaciones sexuales o realizare actos lúbricos o eróticos con la víctima, será sancionado con la pena agravada en un tercio del delito sexual que corresponda.””

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Nicaragua. If you are a representative of Nicaragua and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.