Data Dashboards

Niger
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data with a complete statistical definition is only provdied for 2009. There is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.377 (2018)

Mean School Years: 2.0 years (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 89.0% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 39.5% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Ratified 2015
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 20.6% (2016)

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 5.8% (2016)

Vulnerable: 16.4% (2016)

Children: 4.2% (2016)

Disabled: No data

Poor: 39.5% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes: 

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Niger, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2009.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2009.

 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Niger, the latest estimates show that 3.7 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2009.

Only the measure provided for 2009 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2009 and 2012. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Niger, the latest estimates show that 16.7 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2009.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2009. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2012 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Niger was 9.4 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 15.9 hours in 2009.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2009 and 2012. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2012, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 10.5 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2009, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 20.0. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2009 and 2012. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 12.2 hours per week according to the 2012 estimate. This estimate represents an increase in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2009, which found that children aged 5-14 in Niger worked an average of 9.7 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000, 2006, 2009 and 2012. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Niger is from 2009. By the 2009 estimate, the Other Services sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Agricultural sector, the manufacturing sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Niger.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Niger.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Niger between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Niger is 0.377. This score indicates that human development is low. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Niger over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Nicaragua showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Niger.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Legally Defining 8.7
Travail forcé

Ordonnance n° 2010-86 du 16 décembre 2010 relative à la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2010

Article 2 : Définitions
Au sens de la présente ordonnance, on entend par :
Travail forcé: tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu contre son gré sous la menace d’une sanction quelconque.

Code du Travail, 2012

Article 4 : Le travail forcé ou obligatoire est interdit.
Le terme « travail forcé ou obligatoire » désigne tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu sous la menace d’une peine quelconque et pour lequel ledit individu ne s’est pas offert de plein gré.
Le fait d’exiger le travail forcé ou obligatoire est sanctionné conformément aux dispositions du présent code.
Toutefois, le terme « travail forcé ou obligatoire » ne comprend pas :

1. tout travail ou service exigé en vertu des lois et règlements sur le service militaire obligatoire et ayant un caractère purement militaire ;
2. tout travail ou service d’intérêt général faisant partie des obligations civiques des citoyens, telles qu’elles sont définies par les lois et les règlements ;
3. tout travail ou service exigé d’un individu comme conséquence d’une condamnation prononcée par une décision judiciaire ;
4. tout travail ou service exigé dans les cas de force majeure, notamment dans les cas de guerre, de sinistres ou menaces de sinistres tels qu’incendies, inondations, épidémies et épizooties violentes, invasions d’animaux, d’insectes ou de parasites végétaux nuisibles et, en général, toutes circonstances mettant en danger ou risquant de mettre en danger la vie ou les conditions normales d’existence de l’ensemble ou d’une partie de la population ;
5. tout travail exécuté dans le cadre familial par les enfants, qui ne compromet pas leur développement et leur épanouissement.

Travail des enfants

Code du Travail, 2012

Section 3 : Du travail des enfants
Article 106 : Les enfants ne peuvent être employés dans une entreprise, même comme apprentis, avant l’âge de quatorze (14) ans, sauf dérogation édictée par décret pris en Conseil des Ministres, après avis de la Commission Consultative du Travail et de l’Emploi, compte tenu des circonstances locales et des tâches qui peuvent leur être demandées.
Un décret fixe la nature des travaux et les catégories d’entreprises interdits aux jeunes gens et l’âge limite auquel s’applique l’interdiction.

Décret n° 2017-682/PRN/MET/PS portant partie réglementaire du Code du Travail, 2017

Article 157 : L’emploi des enfants est interdit dans tous les travaux qui mettent en danger leur vie ou leur santé.
L’emploi des enfants de moins de douze (12) ans est interdit de façon absolue.
Les modalités d’emploi des enfants de plus de douze (12) ans sont définis aux articles 162 à 176 ci-dessous.

Article 162 : L’emploi des enfants de douze (12) à treize (13) ans est interdit même en qualité d’apprentis. Toutefois, ces enfants peuvent, en dehors des heures de fréquentation scolaire, être occupés à des travaux légers, sous réserve que ces travaux :

– ne soient pas de nature à porter préjudice à leur assiduité à l’école ou à leur faculté de bénéficier de l’instruction qui y est donnée ;
– n’excèdent pas deux (2) heures par jour aussi bien les jours de classe que les jours de repos ; le nombre total quotidien des heures consacrées à l’école et aux travaux légers ne devant en aucun cas dépasser sept (7) ;
– n’excèdent pas quatre heures et demie (4 h 30 mn) par jour en dehors des périodes de fréquentation scolaire.
Par travaux légers, il faut comprendre :
– les travaux légers domestiques correspondant aux emplois de marmiton, aide-cuisinier, petit boy ou petite bonne, gardien ou gardienne d’enfants ;
– les travaux de cueillette, de ramassage et de triage exécutés dans les exploitations agricoles ;
– les travaux légers à caractère autre qu’industriel sous réserve de l’autorisation spéciale préalable et écrite de l’inspecteur du travail.

Tous travaux, même légers, sont interdits aux enfants de douze (12) et treize (13) ans les dimanches et jours de fêtes légales, ainsi que pendant la nuit entendue comme un intervalle d’au moins douze (12) heures consécutives comprenant la période située entre huit (8) heures du soir et huit (8) heures du matin.

Article 172 : L’emploi des enfants est subordonné à l’autorisation écrite des parents ou tuteurs. Article 173 : Les enfants doivent être soumis avant leur engagement, aux frais de l’employeur, à une
visite médicale devant le médecin de l’entreprise ou, à défaut, devant un médecin agréé.

Pires formes de travail des enfants

Code du Travail, 2012

Article 107 : Les enfants âgés de quatorze (14) ans révolus peuvent effectuer des travaux légers. L’employeur est tenu d’adresser une déclaration préalable à l’inspecteur du travail du ressort qui dispose d’un délai de huit (08) jours pour lui notifier son accord ou son désaccord éventuel.
En tout état de cause, sont interdites les pires formes de travail des enfants. Sont considérées comme pires formes de travail des enfants :

1. toutes formes d’esclavage ou pratiques analogues, telles que la vente et la traite des enfants, la servitude pour dettes et le servage, ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire, y compris le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire des enfants en vue de leur utilisation dans des conflits armés ;
2. l’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant à des fins de prostitution, de production de matériel pornographique ou de spectacles pornographiques ;
3. l’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant aux fins d’activités illicites, notamment pour la production et le trafic de stupéfiants, tels que les définissent les conventions internationales y relatives ;
4. les travaux qui, par leur nature ou les conditions dans lesquelles ils s’exercent, sont susceptibles de nuire à la santé, à la sécurité ou à la moralité de l’enfant.

Le fait de soumettre un enfant à des pires formes de travail est sanctionné conformément aux dispositions du présent Code.
La liste des travaux visés au présent article et les catégories d’entreprises interdites aux enfants, sont fixées par voie réglementaire.

Décret n° 2017-682/PRN/MET/PS portant partie réglementaire du Code du Travail, 2017

Article 158 : Il est interdit d’employer des enfants de moins de dix-huit (18) ans sous peine de poursuites pénales :

– dans toutes les formes d’esclavage ou pratiques analogues, telles que la vente et la traite, la servitude pour dettes et le servage, ainsi que le travail forcé ou obligatoire, y compris le recrutement forcé ou obligatoire en vue de leur utilisation dans des conflits armés ;
– dans l’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant à des fins de prostitution, de production de matériel pornographique ou de spectacles pornographiques ;
– dans l’utilisation, le recrutement ou l’offre d’un enfant aux fins d’activités illicites, notamment pour la production et le trafic de stupéfiants, tel que défini par les conventions internationales pertinentes régulièrement signées et ratifiées par le Niger.

Article 159 : Il est également interdit d’employer des enfants de moins de dix-huit (18) ans dans les travaux qui, par leur nature ou les conditions dans lesquelles ils s’exercent, sont susceptibles de nuire à leur santé, à leur développement, à leur sécurité ou à leur moralité sous peine de sanctions prévues au Code Pénal sur la mise en danger de la vie d’autrui.
L’inspecteur du travail décide du caractère dangereux des travaux.
Appel de la décision de l’Inspecteur du travail peut être porté devant le Ministre chargé du Travail qui statue après avis du Comité Technique Consultatif de Sécurité et Santé au Travail.
Il est en particulier interdit d’employer des enfants de moins de dix-huit (18) ans :

– à la conduite des machines dangereuses ;
– au graissage, au nettoyage, à la visite ou à la réparation des machines ou mécanismes en marche ;
– au travail des cisailles et autres lames tranchantes mécaniques, ainsi qu’à celui des presses de toute nature non munies de dispositifs de sécurité ;
– aux scies circulaires ou aux scies à ruban ; toutefois, l’inspecteur du travail peut autoriser, par écrit et de manière révocable, un tel travail pour les enfants d’au moins seize (16) ans ;
– aux travaux consistant à tourner des roues verticales, des treuils ou des poulies ;
– aux travaux consistant à l’utilisation et à la manipulation d’explosifs ;
– à la conduite et à la surveillance des lignes, appareils et machines électriques de toute
nature dont la tension de régime par rapport à la terre dépasse six cents (600) volts pour les courants continus et cent cinquante (150) volts de tension efficace pour les courants alternatifs ;
– à la manipulation de produits chimiques dangereux ou susceptibles d’émanations nuisibles ; l’accès aux ateliers où sont manipulés ces produits leur est interdit ; la manipulation et l’emploi de la céruse, du sulfate de plomb et des peintures industrielles contenant ces produits leur sont interdits ;
– aux travaux souterrains dans les mines ;
– aux travaux dans l’orpaillage et autres exploitations minières artisanales ;
– à la confection, à la manutention et à la vente d’écrits, imprimés, affiches, dessins,
gravures, peintures, emblèmes, images et autres objets dont la vente, l’offre, l’exposition, l’affichage ou la distribution sont de nature à porter atteinte à leur moralité ; il est également interdit d’employer les enfants à quelque travail que ce soit dans les locaux où s’exécutent de tels travaux.

Il en est de même interdit d’employer des enfants de moins de dix-huit (18) ans :

– dans les locaux où se trouvent des machines actionnées à la main ou par un moteur dont les parties dangereuses ne comportent pas de dispositifs de protection appropriés ;
– dans les établissements où les travaux entraînent la production de poussières nuisibles ;
– dans les abattoirs et dans le transport des viandes et des déchets.

Sont interdites aux enfants, toutes les entreprises dans lesquelles s’effectuent les travaux cités ci-dessus, sauf lorsque des travaux conformes à leurs aptitudes et sans danger pour leur santé peuvent leur être confiés.
La liste des travaux et les catégories d’entreprises interdites aux enfants sont fixées par voie réglementaire.

Article 160 : Il est interdit d’employer des enfants âgés de moins de seize (16) ans sous peine de sanctions pénales :

– aux travaux exécutés à l’aide d’échafaudages volants ;
– à tourner des roues verticales, des treuils ou des poulies ;
– dans les représentations publiques données dans les théâtres, salles de cinéma,
– cafés, concerts, cabarets ou cirques, pour l’exécution de tours de force périlleux ou d’exercices de contorsion.

Article 161 : Il est interdit d’employer des enfants de sexe féminin de moins de seize (16) ans sous peine de sanctions pénales :

– à un travail continu sur des machines à coudre mues par pédales ;
– aux étalages extérieurs des magasins et boutiques.

Article 164 : Dans les mines, exploitations minières et carrières, les enfants ne peuvent être employés qu’à partir de seize (16) ans pour des travaux non souterrains et les plus légers, tels que le triage et le chargement du minerai, la manœuvre et le roulage des wagonnets, dans les limites de poids déterminées au présent décret, et à la garde ou à la manœuvre des postes d’aération. Il est toutefois interdit d’employer ces enfants, même pour le rangement d’atelier, les jours de fêtes légales.

Article 165 : Les enfants âgés de quatorze (14) à dix-huit (18) ans ne peuvent être employés à un travail effectif de plus de huit (8) heures par jour.
Le repos de ces enfants doit avoir une durée de douze (12) heures consécutives au minimum et se situer dans la période comprise entre huit (8) heures du soir et huit (8) heures du matin. II peut toutefois avoir une durée de dix (10) heures lorsqu’un repos compensatoire est accordé au milieu de la journée de travail.

Article 166 : Dans les industries dans lesquelles le travail s’applique à des matières qui seraient susceptibles d’altération très rapide, il peut être dérogé temporairement aux dispositions de l’article précédent pour les enfants de sexe masculin âgés d’au moins seize (16) ans en vue de prévenir les accidents imminents ou de réparer les accidents survenus.
Le bénéfice de cette dérogation est subordonné à l’information préalable de l’inspecteur du travail du ressort.

Traite des personnes

Ordonnance n° 2010-86 du 16 décembre 2010 relative à la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2010

Article 2 : Définitions
Au sens de la présente ordonnance, on entend par :
Traite des personnes: Toute opération ou action qui vise à recruter, transporter, transférer, héberger ou accueillir des personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contraintes, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiement d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant une autorité sur une autre aux fins d’exploitation.
Mineur ou Enfant: toute personne âgée de moins de 18 ans ;

Esclavage

Code Penale, 1961

SECTION II bis. – De l’esclavage (Loi n° 2003-25 du 13 juin 2003). Paragraphe 1. – Du crime de l’esclavage
Art. 270. 1. : L’ « esclavage » est l’état ou la condition d’un individu sur lequel s’exercent les attributs du droit de propriété ou certains d’entre eux ;
« L’esclave » est cet individu qui a ce statut ou cette condition.
La « personne de condition servile » est celle qui est placée dans le statut ou la condition qui résulte d’une des institutions ou pratiques d’esclavage notamment :

1) la servitude ou toute autre forme de soumission ou de dépendance absolue à un maître ;
2) toute institution ou pratique en vertu de laquelle :

a) une femme est, sans qu’elle ait le droit de refuser, promise ou donnée en mariage moyennant une contrepartie en espèces ou en nature versée au maître ;
b) le maître d’une femme considérée comme esclave a le droit de la céder à un tiers, à titre onéreux ou autrement ;
c) le maître a le droit d’entretenir des rapports sexuels avec la femme esclave ;
toute institution ou pratique en vertu de laquelle un mineur de moins de dix-huit ans est remis, soit par ses parents, soit par son tuteur, soit par son maître ou le maître d’un ou de ses deux parents, à un tiers, contre paiement ou non, en vue de l’exploitation de la personne ou du travail dudit mineur.

Paragraphe 2. – Du délit d’esclavage Art. 270. 3 : Constitue le délit ’esclavage

1) toute atteinte à l’intégrité physique ou morale d’une personne en raison de sa condition servile, tout traitement dégradant, inhumain ou humiliant exercé contre cette personne ;
2) le fait pour un maître de percevoir les fruits et les revenus résultant de la prostitution de la femme de condition servile ou du travail de toute personne de « condition servile » ;
3) l’extorsion de fonds, le chantage exercé à l’encontre d’une personne de « condition servile » ;
4) le fait pour un maître de percevoir un tribut d’ une personne en raison du droit de propriété qu’il exerce sur cette personne ;
5) l’enlèvement des enfants prétendus esclaves pour les mettre en servitude.

Constitution de Vla Vllème République, 2010

Article 14.
Nul ne sera soumis à la torture, à l’esclavage ni à des sévices ou traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants.
Tout individu, tout agent de l’État, qui se rendrait coupable d’actes de torture, de sévices ou traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants dans l’exercice ou à l’occasion de l’exercice de ses fonctions, soit de sa propre initiative, soit sur instructions, sera puni conformément à la loi.

Ordonnance n° 2010-86 du 16 décembre 2010 relative à la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2010

Article 2 : Définitions
Au sens de la présente ordonnance, on entend par :
Esclavage: état ou condition d’un individu sur lequel s’exercent les attributs du droit de propriété ou certains d’entre eux ;
Pratiques assimilées à l’esclavage:

1. la servitude pour dettes, c’est-à-dire l’état ou la condition résultant du fait qu’un débiteur soit obligé de proposer en garantie d’une dette ses services personnels ou ceux de quelqu’un sur lequelil a autorité, si la valeur de ces services n’et pas proportionnelle à la liquidation de la dette ou si la durée de ces services n’est pas limitée ni leur caractère défini ;
2. le servage, c’est-à-dire la condition de quiconque est tenu par la loi, la coutume ou un accord, de vivre et de travailler sur une terre appartenant à une autre personne et de fournir à cette autre personne, contre rémunération ou gratuitement, certains services déterminés, sans pouvoir changer sa condition ;
3. toute institution ou pratique en vertu de laquelle, le mari d’une femme, sa famille ou le clan de celui-ci ont le droit de la céder à un tiers, à titre onéreux ou autrement ;

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1961

ILO Protocol to the Forced Labour Convention, P029, Ratification 2015

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1962

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratiication 1978 (minimum age specified: 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2000

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Definitive Signature 1964

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1963

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratification 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Accession 2012

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2004

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Persons (2014–2018)

Includes goals of enhancing the legal framework to prevent human trafficking, adequately implementing the laws, and providing effective protection and care for victims, including children. Led by the ANLTP/TIM. In 2017, implemented awareness-raising campaigns in Agadez as part of National Day for Mobilization Against Trafficking in Persons and organized training in Niamey for law enforcement agencies and civil society on human trafficking. In addition, the ANLTP/TIM released a survey on societal perceptions and attitudes toward human trafficking in Niger to inform enforcement and policy efforts.

Plan for Social and Economic Development (2017–2021)

Aims to promote sustainable development and social equality. Overseen by the Ministry of Planning. Includes activities to improve access to education for vulnerable populations, especially migrant children, and to combat street work and forced begging by children.

National Social Protection Strategy

Aims to improve the quality of, and access to, basic education and health services; includes strategies to combat child labor. Overseen by the Ministry for the Promotion of Women and Child Protection.

UNDAF (2014–2018)

Promotes improved access to education for vulnerable children and aims to build government capacity to address child labor. Falls under the direction of the Ministry of Planning and receives support from international donors.

Education and Training Sectorial Program (PSEF) (2014–2024)

Sets out a comprehensive map to improve the quality of, and access to, basic and higher education. Led by the Ministry of Education. In 2017, the government indicated that the PSEF has increased the primary completion rate in Niger from 49.1 percent in 2012 to 78.4 percent.

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ordonnance n° 2010-86 du 16 décembre 2010 relative à la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2010

Article 2 : Définitions
Au sens de la présente ordonnance, on entend par :
Victime: toute personne qui a directement ou indirectement souffert d’un préjudice, incluant des blessures physiques ou morales, des violations graves de ses droits fondamentaux ou des pertes économiques importantes, du fait d’une des infractions visées à la présente ordonnance.

Article 26 : Confidentialité des informations relatives aux victimes et témoins
II est interdit de communiquer sciemment, directement ou indirectement, des renseignements au sujet du lieu où se trouve une victime ou un témoin ou de son changement d’identité.
Cette interdiction ne vaut pas si la communication aux autorités compétentes de ces informations a pour but la meilleure protection de la victime.
Cette interdiction ne vaut pas si, dans le cadre de la protection d’un témoin, la communication aux autorités compétentes de ces informations a pour but la recherche d’infractions présumées avoir été commises par celui-ci.

Article 27 : Sanction en cas de divulgation d’informations relatives aux victimes
Quiconque divulgue des informations relatives à l’identité de la victime ou qui peuvent compromettre sa sécurité commet une infraction passible d’une peine d’emprisonnement de six (6) mois à deux (2) ans et d’une amende de 20 000 à 200 000 francs ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement.

Article 32 : Immunité pénale des victimes
Les victimes des infractions visées au présent chapitre ne peuvent faire l’objet de poursuites ni de condamnation au titre desdites infractions, notamment, au titre :

1- de l’entrée illégale au Niger ;
2- de la résidence en situation illégale au Niger ;
3- de la possession de documents illégaux de voyage ou d’identité obtenus ou reçus en vue de l’entrée illégale au Niger.

Article 36 : Action civile en réparation
Conformément aux dispositions du Code de Procédure Pénale, les juridictions ordonnent au bénéfice des victimes d’infractions visées à la présente ordonnance, réparation de leur préjudice quel qu’il soit.
Une fois ordonnée, la réparation doit être réalisée dans un délai raisonnable. Les autorités judiciaires peuvent ordonner en motivant leur décision que des biens confisqués ou leur valeur correspondante soient affectés à la réparation et la protection des victimes de la traite.
Le retour de la victime dans son pays d’origine ne préjudicie pas à son droit à réparation.
Une fois le droit à réparation des victimes de la traite assuré, une partie du montant des biens confisqués restant est affecté à travers les subventions de l’Etat mentionnées à l’article 10, aux frais de fonctionnement des institutions de lutte contre la traite, à savoir la Commission Nationale de Coordination de la lutte contre la Traite des Personnes (CNLDT et l’Agence Nationale de Lutte contre la Traite des Personnes (ANLTP).

Article 37 : Intérêt supérieur de l’enfant et besoins spécifiques
Lorsque la victime d’une des infractions visées à la présente loi est un mineur de moins de 18 ans, l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant et ses besoins spécifiques doivent être pris en considération tout au long de la procédure par tout agent public et particulièrement, par les personnes habilitées à constater les infractions.

Article 38 : Droit à une représentation légale
Les victimes d’infractions prévues à la présente ordonnance ont accès et ont droit à être assistées ou représentées en justice, aux stades des enquêtes, poursuites et jugement, que ce soit devant les juridictions pénales ou devant les juridictions civiles, par un conseil choisi ou commis d’office.
Toute association régulièrement déclarée depuis au moins un an à la date des faits et ayant, en vertu de ses statuts comme objectifs, le conseil, la prise en charge ou la réinsertion de victimes des infractions prévues par la présente ordonnance peut, d’office ou sur demande des victimes, les représenter en justice.
Pour les victimes, mineurs de moins de 18 ans, conformément à la loi n° 67-015 du 18 mars 1967 relative à la défense des intérêts civils des mineurs devant les juridictions répressives, le ministère public peut requérir la mise sous tutelle ou administration légale des victimes mineures n’ayant pas de représentant légal connu ou ne présentant pas de garantie de sauvegarde des droits et du bien-être de la victime mineure .
Le tuteur ou l’administrateur désigné du mineur de moins de 18 ans se charge de la défense des intérêts de la victime en bon père de famille.

CHAPITRE VII: MESURES DE PROTECTION, AIDE ET ASSISTANCE
Article 50-60

CHAPITRE VIII: MESURES EN MATIERE D’IMMIGRATION ET DE RAPATRIEMENT
Art 61-66

Policies for Assistance, General

Loi relative au Trafic Illicite de Migrants, 2015

Chapitre IV Des mesures de protection et d’assistance

Policies for Assistance, Slavery

Penal Code, 1961

Paragraphe 3. – Du régime commun
Art. 270. 5 : Toute association régulièrement déclarée depuis au moins un an à la date des faits et ayant en vertu des statuts, comme objectif de combattre l’esclavage ou les pratiques analogues est habilitée à exercer l’action civile en réparation des dommages causés par les infractions à la loi pénale sur l’esclavage.

Penalties
Penalties, Forced Labour

Code du Travail, 2012

Article 337 : Sont punis d’une amende de cinq cent mille (500.000) à deux millions (2.000.000) de francs et d’un emprisonnement de deux (2) à cinq (5) ans ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement, les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions de l’article 4 relatives à l’interdiction du travail forcé ou obligatoire.
En cas de récidive, l’amende est portée au double et la peine d’emprisonnement est de dix (10) à quinze (15) ans.

Penalties, Child Labour

Code du Travail, 2012

Article 345 : Sont punis d’une amende de deux cent mille (200 000) à trois cent mille (300 000) francs et, en cas de récidive, d’une amende portée au double :

a) les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions des articles 28, 29 et 106 ;
b) les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions réglementaires prévues par les articles 34 et 37 ;
c) les auteurs d’infractions aux dispositions de l’article 151.

Article 343 : Est puni d’une amende de cinq millions (5.000.000) à dix millions (10.000.000) de francs et d’un emprisonnement de deux (2) à cinq (5) ans ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement, tout employeur ou toute personne reconnue coupable ou complice de violation de l’interdiction des pires formes de travail des enfants prévue à l’article 107 du présent Code.
En cas de récidive, l’amende est portée au double et l’emprisonnement de cinq (5) à dix (10) ans.
Dans le cas d’infraction à l’article 107, les pénalités ne sont pas encourues si l’infraction a été l’effet d’une erreur portant sur l’âge des enfants commise lors de l’établissement de la carte de travailleur.
En cas de falsification l’auteur sera puni conformément aux textes en vigueur.

Code penal, 1961

Art. 181 : (Loi n ° 63-3 du 1er février 1963). Les parents de mineurs de moins de dix-huit ans se livrant habituellement à la mendicité, tous ceux qui les auront invités à mendier ou qui en tirent sciemment profit, seront punis d’un emprisonnement de six mois à un an.

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ordonnance n° 2010-86 du 16 décembre 2010 relative à la lutte contre la traite des personnes, 2010

CHAPITRE IV : DISPOSITIONS PENALES
Article 10 : Traite des personnes
Constitue l’infraction de traite des personnes le fait de recruter, transporter, transférer, héberger ou accueillir des personnes, par la menace de recours ou le recours à la force ou à d’autres formes de contrainte, par enlèvement, fraude, tromperie, abus d’autorité ou d’une situation de vulnérabilité ou par l’offre ou l’acceptation de paiements ou d’avantages pour obtenir le consentement d’une personne ayant autorité sur une autre aux fins d’exploitation.
L’exploitation comprend, au minimum, l’esclave ou les pratiques analogues à l’esclavage, la servitude ou le prélèvement d’organes, l’exploitation de la prostitution d’autrui ou d’autres formes d’exploitation sexuelle, l’exploitation de la mendicité d’autrui, l’exploitation du travail ou des services forcés.
Le recrutement, le transport, le transfert, l’hébergement ou l’accueil d’un mineur de moins de 18 ans aux fins d’exploitation sont considérés comme une traite des personnes même s’ils ne font appel à aucun des moyens énoncés au premier alinéa.
Quiconque commet intentionnellement l’infraction de traite des personnes est puni d’un emprisonnement de cinq (5) à dix (10) ans et d’une amende de 500 000 à 5 000 000 de francs.

Article 11 : Absence d’effet du consentement
Lorsque les éléments constitutifs des infractions visées au présent chapitre sont réunis, l’auteur des faits ne peut en aucun cas invoquer le consentement de la victime pour se soustraire aux poursuites.
De même, l’auteur des faits ne peut également invoquer le consentement des parents ou de toute autre personne ayant autorité légale sur un mineur de moins de 18 ans pour se soustraire aux poursuites.

Article 12 : Preuve de l’âge de la victime
Dans le cas ou aucun document officiel fiable ne peut déterminer l’âge de la victime, la preuve de l’âge de la victime doit être rapportée par expertise médicale ou tout autre moyen légal.

Article 13 : Indifférence du comportement sexuel antérieur
Dans le cadre des poursuites des auteurs d’infractions de traite des personnes ou toute autre infraction visée au présent chapitre, le comportement sexuel antérieur de la victime est indifférent en matière de rassemblement des preuves et dans la recherche de la manifestation de la vérité.

Article 14 : Tentative
Les dispositions de l’article 2 du Code Pénal s’appliquent aux crimes visés à l’article 24 du présent chapitre. Les dispositions de l’article 3 du Code Pénal s’appliquent à la tentative de délit visée au présent chapitre.

Article 15 : Complicité
Les dispositions des articles 48 et 49 du Code Pénal, s’appliquent aux infractions prévues au présent chapitre.

Article 16 : Organisation et direction d’une infraction
Le fait d’organiser la commission des infractions visées à l’article 24 du présent chapitre ou de donner des instructions à d’autres personnes pour qu’elles les commettent, est puni de la même peine que l’auteur principal.

Article 17 : Adoption aux fins d’exploitation
Tout intermédiaire qui, en violation des lois nationales et internationales en matière d’adoption, aura vicié le consentement des parents ou de toute autre personne ayant autorité légale sur un enfant, de le faire adopter en vue de la commission des infractions visées au présent chapitre, est puni des mêmes peines que celles prévues à l’article 24 ci-dessous.

Article 18 : Infractions relatives aux documents de voyage ou d’identité.
Quiconque, intentionnellement, fabrique, obtient, procure, cache, retient, enlève, falsifie ou détruit tout document de voyage d’une personne ou tout document pouvant établir ou censé établir l’identité ou le statut d’immigrant d’une personne, ou tout autre document officiel d’identification qu’il soit authentique ou non, national ou étranger, sera puni d’un emprisonnement deux (2) à huit (8) ans et d’une amende de 50 000 à 500 000 francs.

Article 19 : Obligations et sanctions des transporteurs en cas de manquement à leurs obligations.
Sans préjudice des conventions internationales ou occasionnelles en la matière dont le Niger est Partie, les compagnies de transport et tout propriétaire ou exploitant d’un moyen de transport sont tenus de s’assurer que les passagers possèdent les documents, quels qu’ils soient, requis pour entrer au Niger ou y transiter.
Cette obligation s’applique aux compagnies et à leurs employés qui vendent, éditent, collectent, vérifient les billets de voyage, les cartes d’embarquement ou tout autre document autorisant le transport.
Pour l’application de l’alinéa précédent, le transporteur n’est pas tenu de s’assurer de l’authenticité ou de la validité des documents de voyage et de la validité de leur délivrance.
Le transporteur qui, intentionnellement, n’obéit pas à l’obligation mise à sa charge commet un délit puni d’une peine d’amende de 200 000 à 500 000 francs.
En cas de récidive, l’auteur sera puni d’un emprisonnement de un à trois mois et d’une peine d’amende de 400 000 à 2 000 000 francs ou de l’une de ces deux peins seulement; en outre, la licence du transporteur peut être suspendue ou retirée.
En outre, les frais afférents à la rétention de la personne au Niger et à sa reconduite ou à son rapatriement hors du territoire national sont à la charge du transporteur.

Article 20 : Exemption de responsabilité pénale des transporteurs Le transporteur n’est pas pénalement responsable au cas où :

1- la personne était en possession des documents légaux requis lors de son embarquement pour entrer au Niger ;
2- l’entrée au Niger n’est intervenue qu’en cas de circonstances indépendantes de la volonté et du contrôle du transporteur ou en cas de force majeure.

Article 21 : Association de malfaiteurs
Toute personne qui s’affilie ou participe à une association en vue de commettre les infractions visées au présent chapitre est punie conformément aux dispositions du Code pénal.

Article 22 : Blanchiment d’argent
Le blanchiment des produits des infractions visées au présent chapitre est puni conformément aux dispositions de la loi 2004-41 du 8 juin 2004 portant sur la lutte contre le blanchiment de capitaux.

Article 29 : Circonstances aggravantesLorsque l’une des infractions visées aux articles 10, 14, 15, 16, 17 à été commise avec l’une des circonstances ci -dessous énumérées, les peines encourues seront de :

1. dix (10) à moins de quinze (15) ans en cas de coups et blessures volontaires;
2. Le double de la peine maximale encourue:

a) si l’auteur s’est soustrait à la justice ;
b) si l’auteur est en été de récidive légale ;
c) si l’auteur a participé à d’autres infractions définitivement jugées ayant facilité l’infraction de la traite ;
d) s’il y a concours d’infractions visées à la présente ordonnance;
e) si l’auteur exerçait des fondions publiques d’autorité et que l’infraction a été commise dans l’exercice de ses fonctions ;
Pour l’application des dispositions précédentes, il est fait référence à l’article 6 paragraphe 1 du Code Pénal.

3. La peine encourue est de dix (10) à trente (30) ans :

a) si l’infraction est commise sur un mineur de moins de 18 ans ;
b) en cas de relation de confiance entre la victime et son auteur, notamment lorsque l’auteur a abusé de sa position hiérarchique lors de sa relation de travail ;
c) si l’auteur est conjoint de la victime;
d) sil’auteur est investi d’une autorité morale envers la victime, notamment son représentant légal, un travailleur social responsable d’une victime.

4. Lorsque les infractions prévues aux articles 10, 14, 15, 16, 17 de la présente ordonnance ont été commises avec deux circonstances aggravantes ou plus, l’emprisonnement sera de quinze (15) à trente (30) ans.
5. La peine encourue est de quinze (15) à trente (30) ans :

a) en cas d’abus sexuel ou de viol;
b) en cas de coups et blessures volontaires ayant entrainé une amputation, mutilation ou privation de l’usage d’un membre, cécité, perte d’un œil ou d’autres infirmités permanentes;
c) si la victime est particulièrement vulnérable notamment si elle a moins de 13 ans ou est physiquement ou mentalement déficiente ;
d) si l’infraction a été commise en groupe organisé dans le cadre d’une activité criminelle systématique, ou sur une longue période de temps ou à large échelle, impliquant notamment, plusieurs victimes;
e) s’il y a eu usage d’armes ou des drogues prohibées.

6. La peine encourue est l’emprisonnement à vie en cas de décès de la victime.
Dans tous les cas, il ne pourra être fait application des dispositions relatives aux circonstances atténuantes et au sursis.

Article 31 : Responsabilité pénale des personnes moralesLa responsabilité pénale des personnes morales est engagée pour les infractions prévues par la présente ordonnance conformément aux dispositions du Code Pénal.
Lorsqu’une des infractions visées à la présente ordonnance a été commise par une personne morale, pour son compte, par ses organes ou représentants, à l’exclusion de l’Etat, celle- ci sera punie d’une peine d’amende de 1 000 000 à 10 000 000 de francs.
La responsabilité pénale des personnes morales n’exclut pas celle des personnes physiques auteurs ou complices des mêmes faits.
La juridiction compétente pourra saisir les biens et toute propriété d’une personne morale et prononcer leur confiscation au profit du Trésor Public ou du fonds d’indemnisation pour les victimes de la traite visées au chapitre 12 de la présente ordonnance.

Penalites, General

Loi relative au Trafic Illicite de Migrants, 2015

Article 16
Article 17

Penalties, Slavery

Code Penale, 1961

Art. 270. 2. : Le fait de réduire autrui en esclavage ou d’inciter autrui à aliéner sa liberté ou sa dignité ou celle d’une personne à sa charge, pour être réduit en esclavage, est puni d’une peine d’emprisonnement de 10 à 30 ans et d’une amende de 1.000.000 à 5.000.000 de francs.
Est puni de la même peine prévue à l’alinéa précédent, le fait pour un maître ou son complice :

1) d’entretenir des rapports sexuels avec une femme considérée esclave ou l’épouse d’un homme considéré comme esclave ;
2) de mettre à la disposition d’une autre personne une femme considérée comme esclave en vue d’entretenir des rapports sexuels.
La complicité et la tentative des infractions prévues aux articles précédents sont passibles de la peine prévue au présent article.

Art. 270. 4 : Toute personne reconnue coupable du délit d’esclavage sera punie d’un emprisonnement de cinq à moins de dix ans et d’une amende de 500. 000 à 1.000. 000 de francs.
La tentative est punissable de la peine prévue à l’alinéa précédent.

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

 

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Niger. If you are a representative of Niger and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.