Data Dashboards

Panama
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2000 and 2014 stayed the same.

0%

2000 – 2014

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.795 (2018)

Mean School Years: 10.2 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 32.2% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 0.6% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Ratified 2016
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 25.0% (2000)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: 37.3% (2016)

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Panama, the percentage of child labourers has stayed the same overall from 2000 to 2014. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2010 and 2014. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Panama, the latest estimates show that 1.0 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The number is lower than in 2013, but is the same percent as in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2010 and 2014. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Panama, the latest estimates show that 7.1 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014. The percentage is lower than in 2013, and has decreased from 7.9 percent in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2010 and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2014 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Panama was 10.3 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 11.5 hours in 2013.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2010 and 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2014, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 20.9 hours per week. This number has increased since 2013, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 18.8. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2010 and 2014. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 2.5 hours per week according to the 2014 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2012, which found that children aged 5-14 in Panama worked an average of 3.5 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided for 2014.

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Panama is from 2014. By the 2014 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Other Services sector, the Manufacturing sector, and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex.

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Panama.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

 

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Panama.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Panama between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Panama is 0.795. This score indicates that human development is high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Panama over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Panama showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Panama.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajo forzado

Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Para los efectos de esta Ley, los siguientes términos se entenderán así:
12. Trabajo o servicio forzado. Todo servicio realizado a una persona bajo la amenaza de un daño o el deber de pago de una deuda”

Constitución Política, 1972

“ARTÍCULO 21. Nadie puede ser privado de su libertad, sino en virtud de mandamiento escrito de autoridad competente, expedido de acuerdo con las formalidades legales y por motivo previamente definido en la Ley. Los ejecutores de dicho mandamiento están obligados a dar copia de él al interesado, si la pidiere.
El delincuente sorprendido in fraganti puede ser aprehendido por cualquier persona y debe ser entregado inmediatamente a la autoridad.
Nadie puede estar detenido más de veinticuatro horas sin ser puesto a órdenes de la autoridad competente. Los servidores públicos que violen este precepto tienen como sanción la pérdida del empleo, sin perjuicio de las penas que para el efecto establezca la Ley.
No hay prisión, detención o arresto por deuda u obligaciones puramente civiles.”

Trabajo Infantil

Constitución Política, 1972

“ARTÍCULO 70. La jornada máxima de trabajo diurno es de ocho horas y la semana laborable de hasta cuarenta y ocho; la jornada máxima nocturna no será mayor de siete horas y las horas extraordinarias serán remuneradas con recargo.
La jornada máxima podrá ser reducida hasta a seis horas diarias para los mayores de catorce años y menores de dieciocho. Se prohíbe el trabajo a los menores de catorce años y el nocturno a los menores de dieciséis, salvo las excepciones que establezca la Ley. Se prohíbe igualmente el empleo de menores hasta de catorce años en calidad de sirvientes domésticos y el trabajo de los menores y de las mujeres en ocupaciones insalubres.
Además del descanso semanal, todo trabajador tendrá derecho a vacaciones remuneradas.
La Ley podrá establecer el descanso semanal remunerado de acuerdo con las condiciones económicas y sociales del país y el beneficio de los trabajadores.”

Código de Trabajo, 1971

“ARTÍCULO 117. Es prohibido el trabajo:
1. De los menores que no hayan cumplido catorce años.
2. De menores hasta de quince años que no hayan completado la instrucción primaria.
ARTÍCULO 119. En las explotaciones agropecuarias, los menores de doce a quince años podrán ser empleados solamente en trabajos livianos y fuera de las horas señaladas para la enseñanza escolar. ”

“ARTÍCULO 123. Al menor con más de doce años le es permitido el trabajo en calidad de empleado doméstico, en trabajos livianos, previa autorización del Ministerio de Trabajo y Bienestar Social y siempre que se cumpla lo dispuesto en el ARTÍCULO 119 en lo que concierne a su instrucción.
Es obligatorio para el empleador que tenga a su servicio a un menor de edad escolar enviarlo a un establecimiento de enseñanza por los menos, hasta completar la escuela primaria. ”

Código de la familia, 1994

“DE LOS MENORES TRABAJADORES
Artículo 508. Se entiende por menor trabajador en condiciones no autorizadas por la ley, al menor de catorce (14) años de edad en cualquier caso de ocupación laboral; y a quien, siendo mayor de dicha edad, pero menor de dieciocho (18) años de edad, desempeña actividades laborales expresamente prohibidas por la ley.
Artículo 509. Es prohibido cualquier trabajo a menores de catorce (14), años de edad, salvo lo preceptuado en el Artículo 716 de este Código.”

“SECCIÓN II
DEL TRABAJO DE LA MUJER Y LOS MENORES EN LAS LABORES AGRÍCOLAS Y DOMÉSTICAS
Artículo 716. Las mujeres y los menores entre doce (12) y catorce (14) años pueden realizar labores agrícolas y domésticas, según las regulaciones de horario, salario, contrato y tipo de trabajo que establece el Código de Trabajo.”

Peores Formas del Trabajo Infantil

Código de Trabajo, 1971

“ARTÍCULO 118. Queda prohibido a los que tengan menos de dieciocho años los trabajos que, por su naturaleza o por las condiciones en que se efectúen, sean peligrosos para la vida, salud o moralidad de las personas que los desempeñan, especialmente los siguientes:….

ARTÍCULO 120. Igualmente se prohíbe el trabajo a los que tengan menos de dieciocho años:
1. En período nocturno, entre las seis de la noche y las ocho de la mañana.
2. Las jornadas extraordinarias o durante los días domingo o de fiesta nacional o duelo nacional. ”

Decreto Ejecutivo 1 Que modifica y adiciona artículos al Decreto Ejecutivo No 19 de 12 de junio de 2006, que aprueba la lista del Trabajo Infantil Peligroso, en el marco de las Peores Formas del Trabajo Infantil, 2016

“Artículo 2. Se considera trabajo peligroso:
1. Todo trabajo en el cual se exponga a labores en nivel subterráneos de la corteza terrestre o actividades submarinas.
2. Las labores que sobrepasen alturas superiores a 1.80 metros (con o sin equipos de protección contra caídas).
3. Trabajos en la cual se manejen, procesen, segregan, mezclen, comprimen, empaquen, comercialicen o detonan todo tipo de material explosivo o sus componentes de fabricación o activación.
4. Los trabajos en el cual el nivel acústico o las vibraciones sobrepase los límites establecidos por las legislaciones nacionales durante la jornada aun utilizando equipos de protección o mutagénicos.
5. Tareas en la cual se manipulen, procesen, envasen, mezclen, destilan, sublimen, licuen, gasifican, procesos similares, conexos o derivados de químicos tóxicos, inflamables, carcinógenos o mutagénicos.
6. Actividades en la que se exponga a frio o calor extremo, conforme a las referencias y límites establecidos por instituciones u organismos calificados y aceptados por la comunidad profesional de seguridad y salud ocupacional.
7. Cualquier trabajo que impliquen el uso de plaguicidas, herbicidas, rodenticidas o cualquier otro químico nocivo para la salud. También la operación maquinarias agrícolas o combustión, eléctricas u otras energías mecánicas.
8. Trabajos que impliquen la exposición o radiaciones ionizantes de actividades industriales radiaciones nucleares.
9. Trabajos de pesca artesanal o industrial, así como cualquier otra actividad realizada más allá de las 12 millas marinas; incluyendo los trabajos de captura, instalación de trampas, recolección, clasificación de pescados, e igualmente trabajos, tareas o pesca subacuáticas.
10. Trabajos que impliquen contactos con energía eléctrica de bajo, medio o alto voltaje; aun utilizando equipos de protección personal.
11. Trabajos de mantenimiento, limpieza o soporte de maquinarias o equipos en operación o movimiento.
12. Trabajos que al estar de pie y/o rodillas el tronco del cuerpo deba adoptar posturas de torsión o flexión importante; incluyendo las extremidades superiores; en postura sentado estar erguido sin respaldo o inclinado hace adelante; incluyendo la torsión del tronco y espacio reducido para las extremidades inferiores.
13. Cualquier actividad que implica la ejecución de tareas o permanecer en locales donde haya sufrimiento humano y/o animal.
14. Actividades con ritmo de trabajo impuesto por maquinarias o dispositivos de producción. Estas tareas se refieren aquellas que el operador / usuario debe realizar las operaciones a la velocidad, frecuencia o periodos dirigidos por la maquinaria.
15. Cualquier actividad en la cual no se tenga acceso a condiciones básicas de saneamiento (agua potable, servicio sanitario).
16. Actividades de servicio doméstico que implican: dormir o no en el hogar del empleador o la imposibilidad de salir del local; sin días de descanso o números limitados de ellos; laborar jornadas prolongadas; continuas o sin horarios fijos; cuidar bienes y/o personas.
17. Trabajos o actividades que expongan al menor a situaciones de abuso psicológico, psicolaboral o psicosocial; o los trabajos que retienen injustificadamente al niño en los locales del empleador.
18. Trabajos que incluyen cuidado de personas enfermas o contactos con ambientes no saludables y riesgos biológicos como los encontrados en los fluidos corporales humanos o de origen animal; vivos o muertos.
19. Trabajos de segregación, separación, clasificación, recolección, transporte o procesamientos de desperdicios.
20. Actividades laborales que incluyan manipulación de dinero, valores, custodia de materiales, equipos u otros
bienes; o protección de personas.
21. Trabajos que requieran el uso de fuerza excesiva, carga de bultos, cajas, sacos, fardos, objetos u otros mediante el transporte manual. El peso máximo de esta carga deberá ser considerablemente inferior al que se admita para trabajadores adultos de sexo masculino en la legislación nacional vigente, límite que se fija en 25 libras.
22. Trabajos que requieran la utilización, manejo o conducción de equipos pesados, de construcción o industria que requieran habilitación especial por las autoridades de tránsito.
23. Trabajos en los cuales se manipulen herramientas de corte por medio de discos, cadenas, hojas afiliadas o prensas cortantes.
24. Actividades de construcción, o sea, las que tienen por objeto la edificación en cualquiera de sus ramas, que incluye su reparación, alteración y ampliación; transformaciones estructurales, la demolición, movimiento de tierra, excavación y la ejecución de obras de ingeniería civil, mecánica y eléctrica con o sin equipos de protección personal.
25. Trabajos en los cuales se muestre contenido pornográfico, erótico sexual, o violencia de cualquier medio.
26. Trabajos en los cuales se requiera permanecer en locales dedicados al almacenamiento, procesamiento o expendio de bebidas alcohólicas.”

“Artículo 2-A. No se aplican estas restricciones a trabajos efectuados por los niños o los menores en las escuelas de enseñanza general, profesional o técnica o en otras instituciones de formación ni al trabajo efectuado por jóvenes desde catorce años de edad en las empresas, siempre que dicho trabajo se lleve a cabo según las condiciones prescritas por la autoridad competente, previa consulta con las organizaciones interesadas de empleadores y de trabajado- res, y sea parte integrante de:
1. Cursos de enseñanzas o formación del que sea primordialmente responsable una escuela o institución de formación;
2. Programas de formación que se desarrollen entera o fundamentalmente en una empresa y que haya sido aprobado por la autoridad competente; o
3. Programas de orientación, destinados a facilitar la elección de una ocupación o de un tipo de formación.”

Decreto Ejecutivo No 19 de 12 de junio de 2006

ARTÍCULO 4. Queda prohibido emplear o contratar a personas menores de dieciocho (18) años de edad, cualquiera sea la condición laboral (asalariada, independiente, o familiar no remunerado), para las actividades, ocupaciones o tareas mencionadas en los artículos anteriores.

Código Penal, 2005

“Artículo 203. Para los fines del artículo anterior, constituyen maltrato a persona menor de edad las siguientes conductas:
1. Causar, permitir o hacer que se le cause daño físico, mental o emocional, incluyendo lesiones físicas ocasionadas por castigos corporales.
2. Utilizar o inducir a que se le utilice en la mendicidad o en propaganda o publicidad no apropiada para su edad.
3. Emplear o permitir que se le emplee en trabajo prohibido o que ponga en peligro su vida o salud.
4. Darle trato negligente.”

Código de la familia, 1994

“DE LOS MENORES TRABAJADORES
Artículo 510. Queda prohibido a los que tengan menos de dieciocho (18) años de edad, los trabajos que por su naturaleza o por las condiciones en que se efectúen sean peligrosos para la vida, salud o moralidad de los menores, o que afectan su asistencia regular a un centro docente, en especial los siguientes:”

“CAPÍTULO II
DE LOS DERECHOS FUNDAMENTALES DEL MENOR
Artículo 489. Todo menor tiene derecho a:
2. Su vida postnatal, a su libertad y dignidad personal;
9. Ser protegido contra toda forma de abandono, violencia, descuido o trato negligente, abuso sexual, explotación y discriminación.
El menor de edad y en la calle, será sujeto prioritario de la atención estatal, a fin de brindarle protección adecuada;”

“15. Ser protegido contra la explotación económica y el desempeño de cualquier trabajo que pueda ser peligroso para su salud física y mental, o que impida su acceso a la educación;
16. Ser protegido contra el uso ilícito de drogas y estupefacientes o sustancias psicotrópicas, y a que se impida su uso en la producción y tráfico de estas sustancias.
Para ello, el Estado sancionará a quienes utilicen a los menores para tales fines y establecerá programas de prevención;
17. Ser protegido del secuestro, la venta o la trata de menores para cualquier fin y en cualquier forma, e igualmente contra las adopciones ilegales;”

Trata de personas

Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Para los efectos de esta Ley, los siguientes términos se entenderán así:
14. Trata de personas. Captación, transporte, traslado, acogida o recepción de personas, recurriendo a la amenaza o al uso de la fuerza y otras formas de coacción, al rapto, al fraude, al engaño, al abuso de poder o de una situación de vulnerabilidad o a la concesión o recepción de pagos. o beneficios para obtener el consentimiento de una persona que tenga autoridad sobre otra, con fines de explotación. Esa explotación incluirá, como mínimo, la explotación de la prostitución u otras formas de explotación sexual, los trabajos o servicios forzados, la esclavitud o las prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, la servidumbre o la extracción ilícita de órganos. ”

Esclavitud

Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Para los efectos de esta Ley, los siguientes términos se entenderán así:
3. Esclavitud. Estado o condición de una persona sobre la cual se ejercitan todos los poderes asociados al derecho de propiedad. ”

 

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratification 1966

ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029, Ratification 2106

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratification 1966

Minimum age specified: 14 years. Minimum age specified for maritime employment and maritime fishing, and for young persons that have not completed compulsory schooling: 15 years. Minimum age specified for underground work in mines: 18 years. The scope of the Convention is limited to those branches of economic activity or types of undertakings listed in Article 5 paragraph 3.

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratification 2000

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratification 2000

Slavery Convention 1926, **

“Signatures or accessions not yet perfected by ratification”

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Not signed

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratification 2004

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratification 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Ratification 2001

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratification 2001

National Action Plans, National Strategies

Roadmap Towards the Elimination of Child Labor (2016–2019)

Aims to eliminate all forms of child labor in Panama by 2020 by strengthening anti-poverty, health, and educational programs and policies.

National Action Plan for the Prevention and Elimination of Sexual Commercial Exploitation of Children and Adolescents

Aims to prevent and eliminate the sexual commercial exploitation of children and adolescents, including by providing services to victims, strengthening CONAPREDES, and raising awareness. Implemented by CONAPREDES, with support from the Public Ministry.

National Plan Against Trafficking in Persons (2012–2022)

Aims to combat human trafficking through prevention, victim assistance, and international cooperation. Includes provisions to protect child victims of human trafficking.

Districts Free of Child Labor

Aims to establish cooperation agreements between MITRADEL and municipal councils to design and implement child labor eradication strategies. MITRADEL adopted this new approach in October 2017 and announced it at the IV Global Conference on the Sustained Eradication of Child Labor, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in November. In December, the municipal councils of Chame and Colón were the first two councils to sign agreements with MITRADEL.

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for assistance, human trafficking

Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Capítulo V Víctima del Delito”

Policies for assistance, general

Código de la familia, 1994

 

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Código de Trabajo, 1971

ARTÍCULO 125. El empleador que infrinja las disposiciones contenidas en este capítulo será sancionado con multas, a favor del tesoro nacional, de 50 a 700 balboas, impuesta por la autoridad administrativa o jurisdiccional de trabajo.

Decreto Ejecutivo No 19 de 12 de junio de 2006

ARTÍCULO 5. Las autoridades competentes identificarán y sancionarán a las personas responsables del incumplimiento de las disposiciones sobre el trabajo infantil peligroso, conforme a las leyes vigentes.

Código Penal, 2005

“Capítulo II
Maltrato de Niño, Niña o Adolescente
Artículo 202. Quien maltrate a una persona menor de edad será sancionado con prisión de dos a cuatro años.
La sanción será de prisión de tres a seis años, siempre que la conducta no constituya delito sancionado con pena mayor, si la persona que maltrata es:

1. Ascendiente.
2. Pariente cercano.
3. La encargada de la guarda, crianza y educación o tutor.
4. La encargada de su cuidado y atención.
5. La que interviene en el proceso de su educación, formación y desarrollo integral.

La sanción será aumentada de una tercera parte a la mitad cuando la víctima sea una persona con discapacidad.
Si el autor está a cargo de la guarda y crianza, se aplicará la pena accesoria correspondiente.
Artículo 203. Para los fines del artículo anterior, constituyen maltrato a persona menor de edad las siguientes conductas:

1. Causar, permitir o hacer que se le cause daño físico, mental o emocional, incluyendo lesiones físicas ocasionadas por castigos corporales.
2. Utilizar o inducir a que se le utilice en la mendicidad o en propaganda o publicidad no apropiada para su edad.
3. Emplear o permitir que se le emplee en trabajo prohibido o que ponga en peligro su vida o salud.
4. Darle trato negligente.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Capítulo VI Disposiciones Penales y Procesales
Sección 1 Disposiciones Penales”

Código Penal, 2005

“Capítulo III
Delitos contra la Identidad y Tráfico de Personas Menores de Edad

Artículo 205. Quien suprima o altere la identidad de un menor de edad en los registros del estado civil será sancionado con prisión de tres a cinco años. La misma pena se aplicará a quien, a sabiendas, entregue un menor de edad a una persona que no sea su progenitor o a quien no esté autorizado para recibirlo.

Artículo 206. Quien entregue con fines o medios ilícitos a un niño, niña o adolescente a una persona que no sea su progenitor o a quien no esté autorizado para recibirlo, será sancionado con pena de tres a seis años de prisión.

Artículo 207. Quien venda, ofrezca, entregue, transfiera o acepte a un niño, niña o adolescente a cambio de remuneración, pago o recompensa será sancionado con pena de prisión de cinco a diez años.
Igual pena se aplicará a quien oferte, posea, consienta, adquiera o induzca la venta de una niña, niño o adolescente con fines de adopción ilegítima, en violación a los instrumentos jurídicos aplicables en materia de adopción. Cuando la venta, ofrecimiento, entrega, transferencia o aceptación de un niño, niña o adolescente tenga como fin la explotación sexual, la extracción de sus órganos, el trabajo forzado o la servidumbre, la pena se aumentará de un tercio a la mitad del máximo.

Artículo 208. Quien sustraiga, traslade, retenga o intente realizar estas conductas en una persona menor de edad con medios ilícitos, tales como secuestro, consentimiento fraudulento o forzado, la entrega o recepción de pagos o beneficios ilícitos, con el fin de lograr el consentimiento de los padres, las personas o la institución a cuyo cargo se haya el menor de edad, será sancionado con ocho a diez años de prisión.”

Código Penal, 2005 amend. Ley núm. 79 de 9 de noviembre de 2011 sobre trata de personas y actividades conexas.

“Capítulo IV
Delitos contra la Trata de Personas
Artículo 456 – A. Quien promueva, dirija, organice, financie, publicite, invite o gestione por cualquier medio de comunicación individual o de masas o de cualquiera otra forma facilite la entrada o salida del país o el desplazamiento dentro del territorio nacional de una persona de cualquier sexo, para realizar uno o varios actos de prostitución o someterlas a explotación, servidumbre sexual o laboral, esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud, trabajos o servicios forzados, matrimonio servil, mendicidad, extracción ilícita de órganos o adopción irregular, será sancionado con prisión de quince a veinte años.
La sanción será de veinte a treinta años de prisión, cuando:

1. La víctima sea una persona menor de edad o se encuentre en una situación de vulnerabilidad o discapacidad o incapaz de consentir.
2. La víctima sea utilizada en actos de exhibicionismo a través de medios fotográficos, filmadoras o grabaciones obscenas
3. El hecho sea ejecutado por medio de engaño, coacción, violencia, amenaza, fraude, sustracción o retención de pasaportes, documentos migratorios o de identificación personal.
4. El hecho sea cometido por pariente cercano, tutor o quien tenga a su cargo la guarda, crianza, educación o instrucción de la víctima.
5. El hecho sea cometido por un servidor público.

Artículo 456 – B. Quien, a sabiendas, destine un bien mueble o inmueble a la comisión del delito descrito en el artículo anterior, será sancionado con prisión de seis a ocho años.
Cuando el dueño, arrendador, poseedor o administrador de un establecimiento o local comercial destinado al público, lo use o permita que sea utilizado, para la comisión de dicho delito, se le impondrá la pena de ocho a doce años de prisión.”

“Artículo 456 – C. Quien posea, transporte, almacene, reciba, entregue, ofrezca, venda, compre o traspase de cualquier manera, en forma ilícita, órganos, tejidos o fluidos humanos será sancionado con prisión de diez a doce años.
Artículo 456 – D. Quien someta o mantenga a personas de cualquier sexto para realizar trabajos o servicios bajo fuerza, engaño, coacción o amenaza será sancionado con prisión de seis a diez años.
La pena de prisión de diez a quince años si la víctima es una persona menor de edad o se encuentra en una situación de vulnerabilidad o discapacidad.
Artículo 456 – E. El consentimiento dado por la víctima en los delitos establecidos en este Capítulo no exime de la responsabilidad penal.”

Penalties, General

Ley núm. 36 de 2013 sobre el tráfico ilícito de migrantes y actividades conexas.

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Panama. If you are a representative of Panama and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.