Papan Pemuka Data

Peru
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

The child labour rate in 2015 is equal to the rate in 1994.

0%

1994- 2015

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate


The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.740 (2015)

Mean School Years: 9 years (2015)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 46.3% (2012)

Working Poverty Rate: 2.8% (2016)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2002
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2002
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 19.3% (2016)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: 3.9% (2016)

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS) resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes: 

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Peru, the percentage of child labourers has not changed from 1994 to 2015. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Peru, the latest estimates show that 0.4 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The number is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 0.9 percent in 2012. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012-2015.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Peru, the latest estimates show that 4.3 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2015. The percentage is lower than in 2014, and has decreased from 6.3 percent in 2012. All measures provided do not cover the full definition of hazardous, but use a reduced definition.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012-2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2015 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Peru was 12.6 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 12.9 hours in 2014.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012-2015.

Weekly Work Hours, Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours.

In 2015, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 18.4 hours per week. This number has decreased since 2014, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 18.2.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012-2015.

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week for children aged 5-14.

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 10.2 hours per week according to the 2000 estimate. This estimate represents a decrease in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 1994, which found that children aged 5-14 in Peru worked an average of 36.1 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 1994 and 2000.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries.

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Peru is from 2007. By the 2007 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector and the Manufacturing sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region.

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: Area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Peru.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Peru.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Peru between 1990 and 2015. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex.

The most recent year of the HDI, 2015, shows that average human development score in Peru is 0.740. This score indicates that human development is high.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Peru over time.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1990 and 2012, Peru showed an increase in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty:

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by age groupings and sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2016. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation.

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children.”

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Peru.

 

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Trabajos y servicios forzados

Constitución Política del Perú de 1993
Artículo 23. El trabajo, en sus diversas modalidades, es objeto de atención prioritaria del Estado, el cual protege especialmente a la madre, al menor de edad y al impedido que trabajan.
El Estado promueve condiciones para el progreso social y económico, en especial mediante políticas de fomento del empleo productivo y de educación para el trabajo.
Ninguna relación laboral puede limitar el ejercicio de los derechos constitucionales, ni desconocer o rebajar la dignidad del trabajador.
Nadie está obligado a prestar trabajo sin retribución o sin su libre consentimiento.

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 3. Definiciones.

3.12. Trabajos o servicios forzados: Todo trabajo o servicio impuesto a un individuo víctima de trata de personas, bajo amenaza de un grave perjuicio a él o sus familiares directos dependientes.

Child Labour

Ley núm. 27337 que aprueba el Código de los Niños y Adolescentes
Artículo 4. A su integridad personal. El niño y el adolescente tienen derecho a que se respete su integridad moral, psíquica y física y a su libre desarrollo y bienestar. No podrán ser sometidos a tortura, ni a trato cruel o degradante.

Se consideran formas extremas que afectan su integridad personal, el trabajo forzado y la explotación económica, así como el reclutamiento forzado, la prostitución, la trata, la venta y el tráfico de niños y adolescentes y todas las demás formas de explotación.

Artículo 51. Edades requeridas para trabajar en determinadas actividades Las edades mínimas requeridas para autorizar el trabajo de los adolescentes son las siguientes:

1. Para el caso del trabajo por cuenta ajena o que se preste en relación de dependencia:

a) Quince años para labores agrícolas no industriales;
b) Dieciséis años para labores industriales, comerciales o mineras;
c) Diecisiete años para labores de pesca industrial.

2. Para el caso de las demás modalidades de trabajo, la edad mínima es catorce años. Por excepción se concederá la autorización a partir de los doce años, siempre que las labores a realizar no perjudiquen su salud o desarrollo, ni interfieran o limiten su asistencia a los centros educativos y permitan su participación en programas de orientación o formación profesional.
Se presume que los adolescentes están autorizados por sus padres o responsables para trabajar cuando habiten con ellos, salvo manifestación expresa en contrario de los mismos.

Artículo 63. Trabajo doméstico o trabajo familiar no remunerado. Los adolescentes que trabajan en el servicio doméstico o que desempeñan trabajo familiar no remunerado tienen derecho a un descanso de doce horas diarias continuas. Los empleadores, patronos, padres o parientes están en la obligación de proporcionarles todas las facilidades para garantizar su asistencia regular a la escuela.
Compete al Juez especializado conocer el cumplimiento de las disposiciones referidas al trabajo de adolescentes que se realiza en domicilios.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Ley núm. 27337 que aprueba el Código de los Niños y Adolescentes
Artículo 58. Trabajos Prohibidos. Se prohíbe el trabajo de los adolescentes en subsuelo, en labores que conlleven la manipulación de pesos excesivos o de sustancias tóxicas y en actividades en las que su seguridad o la de otras personas esté bajo su responsabilidad.
El PROMUDEH, en coordinación con el Sector Trabajo y consulta con los gremios laborales y empresariales, establecerá periódicamente una relación de trabajos y actividades peligrosas o nocivas para la salud física o moral de los adolescentes en las que no deberá chupárselas.

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 3. Definiciones.

4. Explotación sexual comercial de niñas, niños y adolescente: Actividad ilícita y delictiva consistente en someter y obligar a niños, niñas o adolescentes a situaciones sexuales, eróticas u actos análogos, en beneficio propio o de terceros.

Trata de seres humanos

Constitución Política del Perú de 1993
Artículo 2.24. A la libertad y a la seguridad personales. En consecuencia:

a. Nadie está obligado a hacer lo que la ley no manda, ni impedido de hacer lo que ella no prohíbe.
b. No se permite forma alguna de restricción de la libertad personal, salvo en los casos previstos por la ley. Están prohibidas la esclavitud, la servidumbre y la trata de seres humanos en cualquiera de sus formas.
c. No hay prisión por deudas. Este principio no limita el mandato judicial por incumplimiento de deberes alimentarios.

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 3. Definiciones.

3. Explotación: Utilizar de modo abusivo, en provecho propio o de terceros a una persona, induciendo u obligándola a determinada conducta, aprovechando la ascendencia sobre ella.
6. Mendicidad: Práctica permanente o eventual que consiste en solicitar de alguien de modo persistente y humillante una dádiva o limosna. La mendicidad no genera transacción económica, prestación de servicios ni relación laboral alguna.

Decreto legislativo núm. 635 por el que se promulga el Código Penal, aprobado por la Comisión Revisora constituida por la ley núm. 25280, 1991 amend. Ley 28950, 2007
Artículo 153. Trata de personas. El que promueve, favorece, financia o facilita la captación, transporte, traslado, acogida, recepción o retención de otro, en el territorio de la República o para su salida o entrada del país, recurriendo a: la violencia, la amenaza u otras formas de coacción, la privación de libertad, el fraude, el engaño, el abuso del poder o de una situación de vulnerabilidad, o la concesión o recepción de pagos o beneficios, con fines de explotación, venta de niños, para que ejerza la prostitución, someterlo a esclavitud sexual u otras formas de explotación sexual, obligarlo a mendigar, a realizar trabajos o servicios forzados, a la servidumbre, la esclavitud o prácticas análogas a la esclavitud u otras formas de explotación laboral, o extracción o tráfico de órganos o tejidos humanos, será reprimido con pena privativa de libertad no menor de ocho ni mayor de quince años.
La captación, transporte, traslado, acogida, recepción o retención de niño, niña o adolescente con fines de explotación se considerará trata de personas incluso cuando no se recurra a ninguno de los medios señalados en el párrafo anterior.

Slavery

Constitución Política del Perú de 1993
Artículo 2.24. A la libertad y a la seguridad personales. En consecuencia:

a. Nadie está obligado a hacer lo que la ley no manda, ni impedido de hacer lo que ella no prohíbe.
b. No se permite forma alguna de restricción de la libertad personal, salvo en los casos previstos por la ley. Están prohibidas la esclavitud, la servidumbre y la trata de seres humanos en cualquiera de sus formas.
c. No hay prisión por deudas. Este principio no limita el mandato judicial por incumplimiento de deberes alimentarios.

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 3. Definiciones.

2. Esclavitud: Estado o condición por el cual una persona queda sometida al dominio y voluntad de otra quedando despojado de ejercer sus derechos inherentes y su libertad.
8. Prácticas análogas a la esclavitud o personas en condición de servidumbre: Toda práctica o condición por la cual un niño, niña o adolescente, es entregado por su padre o padres, tutor, u otra persona que tenga ascendencia sobre la víctima, a cambio de una contraprestación económica u otro beneficio, con el propósito de que se explote la persona o el trabajo del niño, de la niña o adolescente.
Asimismo, conforme a lo dispuesto por la “Convención suplementaria sobre la abolición de la esclavitud, la trata de esclavos y las instituciones y prácticas análogas a la esclavitud”, se entenderá por:

a. La servidumbre por deudas.- El estado o la condición de una persona que se
compromete a prestar sus servicios, o los de un tercero sobre quien ejerce autoridad o ascendencia, como pago o garantía de una deuda, de manera indefinida en tiempo, modo y naturaleza, siendo que los servicios prestados por la víctima no guardan relación con la deuda.
b. La servidumbre de la gleba.- El estado o la condición de la persona que está obligada por ley, por la costumbre o por un acuerdo a vivir y a trabajar sobre una tierra que pertenece a otra persona y a prestar a ésta mediante remuneración o gratuitamente determinados servicios sin libertad para cambiar su condición.

International Commitments
National Strategies

National Strategy for the Prevention and Eradication of Child Labour (2012-2021)

“Aims to eliminate the worst forms of child labor by improving livelihoods of low-income families,
educational opportunities, and working conditions for adolescents; raising awareness of child labor;
and increasing child labor law enforcement. Also seeks to improve the quality of child labor
data in Peru.”

National Action Plan for Children and Adolescents (2012-2021)

“Establishes a comprehensive set of government policies for children and adolescents to eradicate the worst forms of child labor.”

Second National Plan to Combat Forced Labour (2013-2017)

“Establishes policies and priorities for combating forced labor to reduce children’s vulnerability to
becoming engaged in forced labor.”

Intersectoral Protocol Against Forced Labour

“Outlines the Government’s role in combating forced labor and provides for the housing, legal defense, and educational reintegration of children and adolescent victims of forced labor. Monitored by the National Commission Against Forced Labor.”

International Commitments

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1960

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1960

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2002

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2002

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Signature 1956

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Ratified 2002

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: involvement of children in armed conflict, Ratified 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Ratified 2002

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Policies for Assistance

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 7. Ministerio de Educación. El Ministerio de Educación, a través de sus órganos competentes, desarrollará estrategias descentralizadas para la prevención contra los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Identificación de población Educativa Vulnerable.
b) Orientación y derivación de casos a las autoridades u organismos competentes.
c) Fortalecimiento de los mecanismos de protección institucionales.
d) Priorización de acciones de sensibilización a la comunidad educativa de zonas rurales de mayor vulnerabilidad a la problemática de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
e) Desarrollo de otras acciones propias del Sector destinadas a prevenir la trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.

Artículo 8. Ministerio de la Mujer y Desarrollo Social. El Ministerio de la Mujer y Desarrollo Social, a través de sus órganos competentes, desarrollará estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, para lo cual deberá:

a) Proponer los lineamientos de intervención para la protección de víctimas de trata de personas y el tráfico ilícito de migrantes en todos los proyectos, programas y servicios del Sector.
b) Capacitación a los operadores de sus servicios institucionales, así como a los grupos vulnerables.
c) Coordinar y supervisar, en los ámbitos de su competencia, los servicios de atención afines, para la prevención del delito de trata de niñas, niños y adolescentes.
d) Coordinar estrategias conjuntas con las instancias descentralizadas del Sector, Gobiernos Regionales y Locales para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
e) Generar mecanismos de información para las agencias internacionales y nacionales de adopción, centros de atención residencial, padres biológicos y preadoptantes, sobre las implicancias del delito de trata de niños, niñas y adolescentes.

Artículo 9. Ministerio de Salud. El Ministerio de Salud, a través de sus órganos competentes, coordinará en el Sector, el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
Artículo 10. Ministerio del Interior. El Ministerio del Interior, a través de la Secretaría Permanente de la Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos del Sector, la Dirección General de Migraciones y Naturalización, la Secretaría Técnica del Consejo Nacional de Seguridad Ciudadana y la Policía Nacional del Perú, promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes de manera descentralizada, en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Capacitación al personal del Sector.
b) Capacitación al personal que desarrolla los programas preventivos promocionales de la Policía Nacional del Perú.
c) Diseño de una estrategia comunicacional de difusión de la normatividad de la trata de personas.
d) Difusión de línea contra la trata de personas 0800-2-3232.
e) Promoción de propuestas que incluya la presentación del Documento Nacional
de Identidad del menor de edad para la expedición o revalidación de pasaportes de menores de edad, además de los requisitos establecidos en la normatividad vigente.
f) Vigilar que en el traslado de niñas, niños y adolescentes, éstos cuenten con el Documento Nacional de Identidad o partida de nacimiento, y de corresponder autorización de viaje de acuerdo a la legislación vigente.
g) Orientación sobre los riesgos de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes a los usuarios de los servicios de migraciones.
h) Promover investigaciones sobre la trata de personas en el ámbito académico policial que permita entre otros identificar las redes de trata de personas.
i) Otras que se derivan del presente reglamento y de las normas propias del sector.

Artículo 11. Ministerio de Comercio Exterior y Turismo. El Ministerio de Comercio Exterior y Turismo, en cumplimiento del Código Ético Mundial para el Turismo, promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias orientadas a la prevención de la trata de personas con fines de explotación sexual comercial, de niños, niñas y adolescentes en el ámbito de turismo y viajes, impulsando, entre otras, las siguientes acciones:

a) Sensibilizar a los prestadores de servicios turísticos para que se conviertan en operadores activos en la prevención de la trata de personas.
b) Promover la suscripción de instrumentos orientados a la prevención del delito de trata de personas principalmente de niños, niñas y adolescentes en el ámbito del turismo.
c) Promover la inclusión de la temática del delito de trata de personas en la currícula de las escuelas, institutos y facultades de formación en turismo.

Artículo 12. Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores. El Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, a través de la Secretaría de Comunidades Peruanas en el Exterior y las Oficinas Consulares promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los Delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Difusión de los servicios de orientación en las Oficinas a los nacionales en el extranjero.
b) Capacitación a funcionarios consulares sobre los alcances y riesgos de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.

Artículo 13. Ministerio de Justicia. El Ministerio de Justicia, a través de sus Direcciones, promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Difusión de los servicios de orientación y asistencia legal a las víctimas del delito de trata de personas.
b) Sistematización de la normatividad nacional e internacional sobre los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
c) Elaboración de propuestas normativas y otras que se requiera para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, en coordinación con el Grupo de Trabajo Multisectorial Permanente contra la Trata de Personas.

Artículo 14. Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones. El Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones, a través de sus Direcciones y Programas, colaborará con las autoridades competentes, en el desarrollo de políticas y acciones para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, en el ámbito de su competencia y en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Capacitación a los funcionarios y servidores para la identificación de casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
b) Desarrollar Directivas a fin que los transportistas exijan la presentación del Documento Nacional de Identidad o Partida de Nacimiento y autorización de viaje de ser el caso, para la expedición de los boletos de viaje de menores de edad.
c) Desarrollar Directivas a fin que los transportistas estén obligados a prestar apoyo a las autoridades competentes para el control del cumplimiento de la identificación de los pasajeros en los medios de transportes terrestres, fluviales, aéreos y marítimos.

Artículo 15. Ministerio de Trabajo y Promoción del Empleo. El Ministerio de Trabajo y Promoción del Empleo a través de sus Direcciones y Programas, promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes, en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Capacitación a los funcionarios y servidores para la orientación e identificación de casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
b) Supervisión de centros de trabajo, domicilios, agencias de colocación empleos y otros que hagan sus veces conforme a lo dispuesto en la Ley No 28806, Ley General de Inspección del Trabajo.
c) Asesoramiento y charlas informativas a la población laboral.
d) Orientación a la población vulnerable que participa en los Programas de Capacitación e Inserción Laboral, sobre los riesgos de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.

Artículo 16. Ministerio Público. El Ministerio Público promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Capacitación a funcionarios y servidores para la identificación de casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes e implementación de medidas preventivas.
b) Promoción de la especialización del personal del Ministerio Público para el cumplimiento de la Ley N 28950 – Ley contra la Trata de Personas y el Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes.

Artículo 17. Poder Judicial. El Poder Judicial, promoverá el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de la trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes de migrantes, en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Capacitación del personal y funcionarios para la intervención de casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
b) Promoción de la especialización del personal jurisdiccional integrante de los Juzgados Especializados que se constituyan para el cumplimiento de la Ley N 28950 – Ley contra la Trata de Personas y el Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes.
c) Sistematización y difusión de la estadística de los casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.

Artículo 18. Gobiernos Regionales y Locales. Los Gobiernos Regionales y Locales, promoverán el desarrollo de estrategias para la prevención de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes; así como la atención a las víctimas y sus familiares directo dependientes en los siguientes aspectos:

a) Promoción y constitución de redes regionales y locales de lucha contra la trata de personas, conforme al artículo 10o, numeral 2, de la Ley No 27867 – Ley Orgánica de Gobiernos Regionales, referida a las competencias compartidas.
b) Coordinación y fortalecimiento de las redes regionales y locales de lucha contra la trata de personas.
c) Incorporación de las víctimas de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes en los programas y servicios sociales regionales y locales como: seguridad ciudadana, Defensorías Municipales del Niño y el Adolescente, Oficina Municipal para la atención a las personas con Discapacidad, Programa de Apoyo Alimentario, Comités Municipales por los Derechos del Niño y otros.
d) Identificación de población vulnerable a los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes.
e) Orientación y derivación de casos. La derivación se efectuará a la dependencia policial de la jurisdicción o al Ministerio Público.
f) Fortalecimiento De Factores De Protección.

Artículo 25. Protección y asistencia. El Estado Peruano, con la colaboración de la sociedad civil, organismos internacionales y otras organizaciones sociales, brindará a las víctimas, colaboradores, testigos, peritos y sus familiares directos dependientes, según corresponda, las siguientes medidas:

1. Repatriación segura. Retorno del nacional víctima del delito de trata de personas y sus familiares directos dependientes al país de origen garantizando su integridad, seguridad personal y el respeto a sus derechos humanos.
2. Alojamiento transitorio. Lugar donde permanecerán de manera temporal las víctimas, peritos, colaboradores, testigos y sus familiares directos dependientes.
3. Asistencia integral de salud, social y legal. Adopción de medidas por parte del Estado o en coordinación con otros Estados, organismos internacionales, organizaciones sociales y sociedad civil, para brindar servicios de atención integral de salud, atención psicológica, social y legal a la víctima del delito, colaboradores, testigos, peritos y sus familiares directos dependientes.
4. Mecanismos de inserción social. Programas de apoyo que brinda el Estado directamente o en coordinación con otros Estados, organismos internacionales, organizaciones sociales y sociedad civil a las víctimas y sus familiares directos dependientes del delito de trata de personas.
5. Protección. Las medidas de protección son las que están previstas en la Ley N° 27378 y su Reglamento, aprobado por Decreto Supremo N° 020-2001- JUS, que establecen beneficios por colaboración eficaz en el ámbito de la criminalidad organizada.

La Unidad Especial de Investigación, comprobación y protección de la Policía Nacional del Perú, comunicará a la Secretaría Técnica de Grupo de Trabajo Multisectorial Permanente contra la Trata de Personas las información estadística sobre víctimas, testigos colaboradores y peritos a los cuales se les haya otorgado medidas de protección.

Penalties
Penalties, General

Decreto legislativo núm. 635 por el que se promulga el Código Penal, aprobado por la Comisión Revisora constituida por la ley núm. 25280, 1991 amend. Ley 28190, 2004
Artículo 128. El que expone a peligro la vida o la salud de una persona colocada bajo su autoridad, dependencia, tutela, curatela o vigilancia, sea privándola de alimentos o cuidados indispensables, sea sometiéndose a trabajos excesivos, inadecuados, sea abusando de los medios de corrección o disciplina, sea obligándola o induciendo a mendigar en lugares públicos, será reprimido con pena privativa de libertad no menor de uno ni mayor de cuatro años.
En los casos en que el agente tenga vínculo de parentesco consanguíneo o la víctima fuere menor de doce años de edad, la pena será privativa de libertad no menor de dos ni mayor de cuatro años.
En los casos en que el agente obligue o induzca a mendigar a dos o más personas colocadas bajo su autoridad, dependencia, tutela, curatela o vigilancia, la pena privativa de libertad será no menor de dos ni mayor de cinco años.

Decreto legislativo núm. 635 por el que se promulga el Código Penal, aprobado por la Comisión Revisora constituida por la ley núm. 25280, 1991 amend. Ley 26926, 1998
Artículo 129. En los casos de los Artículos 125 y 128, si resulta lesión grave o muerte y éstas pudieron ser previstas, la pena será privativa de libertad no menor de tres ni mayor de seis años en caso de lesión grave y no menor de cuatro ni mayor de ocho en caso de muerte.

Artículo 168. Será reprimido con pena privativa de libertad no mayor de dos años el que obliga a otro, mediante violencia o amenaza, a realizar cualquiera de los actos siguientes:

1. Integrar o no un sindicato.
2. Prestar trabajo personal sin la correspondiente retribución.
3. Trabajar sin las condiciones de seguridad e higiene industriales determinadas por la autoridad. La misma pena se aplicará al que incumple las resoluciones consentidas o ejecutoriadas dictadas por la autoridad competente; y al que disminuye o distorsiona la producción, simula causales para el cierre del centro de trabajo o abandona éste para extinguir las relaciones laborales.

Penalties, Worst Forms of Child Labour

Decreto legislativo núm. 635 por el que se promulga el Código Penal, aprobado por la Comisión Revisora constituida por la ley núm. 25280, 1991 amend. Ley 28950, 2007
Artículo 182A. Publicación en los medios de comunicación sobre delitos de libertad sexual a menores
Los gerentes o responsables de las publicaciones o ediciones a transmitirse a través de los medios de comunicación masivos que publiciten la prostitución infantil, el turismo sexual infantil o la trata de menores de dieciocho años de edad serán reprimidos con pena privativa de la libertad no menor de dos ni mayor de seis años.
El agente también será sancionado con inhabilitación conforme al inciso 4 del artículo 36 y con trescientos sesenta días multa.

Ley núm. 27337 que aprueba el Código de los Niños y Adolescentes
Artículo 70. Competencia y responsabilidad administrativa. Es competencia y responsabilidad del PROMUDEH, de la Defensoría del Niño y Adolescente y de los Gobiernos Locales, vigilar el cumplimiento y aplicar las sanciones administrativas de su competencia cuando se encuentren amenazados o vulnerados los derechos de los niños y adolescentes.
Los funcionarios responsables serán pasibles de multas y quedarán obligados al pago de daños y perjuicios por incumplimiento de estas disposiciones, sin perjuicio de las sanciones penales a que haya lugar.

Penalties, Human trafficking

Ley N° 28950 contra Trata de Personas y Tráfico Ilícito de Migrantes
Artículo 20. Registro sobre casos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes. El Sistema de Registro y Estadística del delito de Trata de Personas y afines (RETA) es administrada por la Dirección de Investigación Criminal y Apoyo a la Justicia de la Policía Nacional del Perú y monitoreado por la Secretaría Técnica del Grupo de Trabajo Multisectorial Permanente contra la Trata de Personas.
El Ministerio Público y el Poder Judicial implementarán registros institucionales de los procesos por la comisión de los delitos de trata de personas y tráfico ilícito de migrantes los cuales deberán contener, como mínimo, el estado del proceso, la identidad de las víctimas y procesados, su situación jurídica, así como el distrito judicial de procedencia.

Decreto legislativo núm. 635 por el que se promulga el Código Penal, aprobado por la Comisión Revisora constituida por la ley núm. 25280, 1991 amend. Ley 28950, 2007
Artículo 153A.- Formas agravadas de la Trata de Personas
La pena será no menor de doce ni mayor de veinte años de pena privativa de libertad e inhabilitación conforme al artículo 36 incisos 1, 2, 3, 4 y 5 del Código Penal, cuando:

1. El agente comete el hecho abusando del ejercicio de la función pública;
2. El agente es promotor, integrante o representante de una organización social, tutelar o empresarial, que aprovecha de esta condición y actividades para perpetrar este delito;
3. Exista pluralidad de víctimas;
4. La víctima tiene entre catorce y menos de dieciocho años de edad o es incapaz;
5. El agente es cónyuge, conviviente, adoptante, tutor, curador, pariente hasta el cuarto grado de consanguinidad o segundo de afinidad, o tiene a la víctima a su cuidado por cualquier motivo o habitan en el mismo hogar.
6. El hecho es cometido por dos o más personas. La pena será privativa de libertad no menor de 25 años, cuando:

1. Se produzca la muerte, lesión grave o se ponga en inminente peligro la vida y la seguridad de la víctima.
2. La víctima es menor de catorce años de edad o padece, temporal o permanentemente, de alguna discapacidad física o mental.
3. El agente es parte de una organización criminal.

Artículo 182. Trata de personas. El que promueve o facilita la entrada o salida del país o el traslado dentro del territorio de la República de una persona para que ejerza la prostitución, será reprimido con pena privativa de libertad no menor de cinco ni mayor de diez años.
La pena será no menor de ocho ni mayor de doce años, si media alguna de las circunstancias agravantes enumeradas en el artículo anterior.

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement (Source: U.S. Department of Labor)

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

 

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Peru. If you are a representative of Peru and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.