Data Dashboards

Portugal
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data is only available for 2001. There is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Human Trafficking

The data visualization displays the number of identified victims of human trafficking per year in Portugal. Detailed information is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Human trafficking: Case data available
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.850 (2018)

Mean School Years: 9.2 years (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 12.3% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: No data available

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Ratified 2020
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2004
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 90.2% (2016)

Unemployed: 46.6% (2014)

Pension: 82.2% (2014)

Vulnerable: 59.3% (2016)

Children: 93.1% (2016)

Disabled: 89.2% (2016)

Poor: 100% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Portugal, the latest estimates show that 0.2 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided. 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Portugal, the latest estimates show that 3.3 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2001.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is not provided. 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Portugal is from 2001. By the 2001 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Manufacturing sector, the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors and the Other Services sector.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The chart below shows the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex.

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

Identified Victims of Human Trafficking (Source: GRETA)

According to the European Commission, Portugal is primarily a country of destination for human trafficking, and to a lesser extent a country of origin and transit. Trafficking for the purposes of labour exploitation is the most prevalent form of trafficking in Portugal, which affects both migrants and Portuguese citizens. The majority of identified victims is male.

The graph on the right shows the number of identified victims of human trafficking per year in Portugal, as reported by Portuguese authorities to the Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA).

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Portugal between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Portugal is 0.850. This score indicates that human development is very high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Portugal over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Portugal showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status. 

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Portugal.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Constitucion, 1976

“Artigo 59.o
(Direitos dos trabalhadores)
1. Todos os trabalhadores, sem distinção de idade, sexo, raça, cidadania, território de origem,
religião, convicções políticas ou ideológicas, têm direito:

a) À retribuição do trabalho, segundo a quantidade, natureza e qualidade, observando- se o princípio de que para trabalho igual salário igual, de forma a garantir uma existência condigna;
b) A organização do trabalho em condições socialmente dignificantes, de forma a facultar a realização pessoal e a permitir a conciliação da actividade profissional com a vida familiar;
c) A prestação do trabalho em condições de higiene, segurança e saúde;
d) Ao repouso e aos lazeres, a um limite máximo da jornada de trabalho, ao descanso
semanal e a férias periódicas pagas;
e) À assistência material, quando involuntariamente se encontrem em situação de desemprego;
f) A assistência e justa reparação, quando vítimas de acidente de trabalho ou de doença profissional.

2. Incumbe ao Estado assegurar as condições de trabalho, retribuição e repouso a que os trabalhadores têm direito, nomeadamente:

a) O estabelecimento e a actualização do salário mínimo nacional, tendo em conta, entre outros factores, as necessidades dos trabalhadores, o aumento do custo de vida, o nível de desenvolvimento das forças produtivas, as exigências da estabilidade económica e financeira e a acumulação para o desenvolvimento;
b) A fixação, a nível nacional, dos limites da duração do trabalho;
c) A especial protecção do trabalho das mulheres durante a gravidez e após o parto, bem como do trabalho dos menores, dos diminuídos e dos que desempenhem actividades particularmente violentas ou em condições insalubres, tóxicas ou perigosas;
d) O desenvolvimento sistemático de uma rede de centros de repouso e de férias, em cooperação com organizações sociais;
e) A protecção das condições de trabalho e a garantia dos benefícios sociais dos trabalhadores emigrantes;
f) A protecção das condições de trabalho dos trabalhadores estudantes. 3. Os salários gozam de garantias especiais, nos termos da lei.”

Child Labour

Lei n.o 7/2009 de 12 de Fevereiro Aprova a revisão do Código do Trabalho

“Artigo 3.º

Trabalho autónomo de menor

1 – O menor com idade inferior a 16 anos não pode ser contratado para realizar uma atividade remunerada prestada com autonomia, exceto caso tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória ou esteja matriculado e a frequentar o nível secundário de educação e se trate de trabalhos leves.
2 – À celebração do contrato previsto no número anterior aplicam-se as regras gerais previstas no Código Civil.
3 – Consideram-se trabalhos leves para efeitos do n.º 1 os que assim forem definidos para o contrato de trabalho celebrado com menor.
4 – Ao menor que realiza actividades com autonomia aplicam-se as limitações estabelecidas para o contrato de trabalho celebrado com menor.”

“SUBSECÇÃO V
Trabalho de menores
Artigo 66.o
Princípios gerais relativos ao trabalho de menor
1 — O empregador deve proporcionar ao menor con- dições de trabalho adequadas à idade e ao desenvolvi- mento do mesmo e que protejam a segurança, a saúde, o desenvolvimento físico, psíquico e moral, a educação e a formação, prevenindo em especial qualquer risco resultante da sua falta de experiência ou da inconsciência dos riscos existentes ou potenciais.
2 — O empregador deve, em especial, avaliar os riscos relacionados com o trabalho, antes de o menor o iniciar ou antes de qualquer alteração importante das condições de trabalho, incidindo nomeadamente sobre:

a) Equipamento e organização do local e do posto de trabalho;
b) Natureza, grau e duração da exposição a agentes físicos, biológicos e químicos;
c) Escolha, adaptação e utilização de equipamento de trabalho, incluindo agentes, máquinas e aparelhos e a res- pectiva utilização;
d) Adaptação da organização do trabalho, dos processos de trabalho ou da sua execução;
e) Grau de conhecimento do menor no que se refere à execução do trabalho, aos riscos para a segurança e a saúde e às medidas de prevenção

3 — O empregador deve informar o menor e os seus representantes legais dos riscos identificados e das medidas tomadas para a sua prevenção.
4 — A emancipação não prejudica a aplicação das nor- mas relativas à protecção da saúde, educação e formação do trabalhador menor.
5 — Constitui contra-ordenação muito grave a violação do disposto nos n.os 1, 2 ou 3..”

“Artigo 68.o
Admissão de menor ao trabalho
1 — Só pode ser admitido a prestar trabalho o menor que tenha completado a idade mínima de admissão, tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória e disponha de capa- cidades físicas e psíquicas adequadas ao posto de trabalho.
2 — A idade mínima de admissão para prestar trabalho é de 16 anos.
3 — O menor com idade inferior a 16 anos que tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória pode prestar trabalhos leves que consistam em tarefas simples e definidas que, pela sua natureza, pelos esforços físicos ou mentais exigi- dos ou pelas condições específicas em que são realizadas, não sejam susceptíveis de o prejudicar no que respeita à integridade física, segurança e saúde, assiduidade escolar, participação em programas de orientação ou de forma- ção, capacidade para beneficiar da instrução ministrada, ou ainda ao seu desenvolvimento físico, psíquico, moral, intelectual e cultural.
4 — Em empresa familiar, o menor com idade inferior a 16 anos deve trabalhar sob a vigilância e direcção de um membro do seu agregado familiar, maior de idade.
5 — O empregador comunica ao serviço com competên- cia inspectiva do ministério responsável pela área laboral a admissão de menor efectuada ao abrigo do n.o 3, nos oito dias subsequentes.
6 — Constitui contra-ordenação grave a violação do disposto nos n.os 3 ou 4 e constitui contra-ordenação leve a violação do disposto no número anterior.”

“Artigo 69.o
Admissão de menor sem escolaridade obrigatória ou sem qualificação profissional
1 — O menor com idade inferior a 16 anos que tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória mas não possua qua- lificação profissional, ou o menor com pelo menos 16 anos idade mas que não tenha concluído a escolaridade obriga- tória ou não possua qualificação profissional só pode ser admitido a prestar trabalho desde que frequente modalidade de educação ou formação que confira, consoante o caso, a escolaridade obrigatória, qualificação profissional, ou ambas, nomeadamente em Centros Novas Oportunidades.
2 — O disposto no número anterior não é aplicável a menor que apenas preste trabalho durante as férias esco- lares.
3 — Na situação a que se refere o n.o 1, o menor benefi- cia do estatuto de trabalhador-estudante, tendo a dispensa de trabalho para frequência de aulas com duração em dobro da prevista no n.o 3 do artigo 90.o
4 — O empregador comunica ao serviço com competên- cia inspectiva do ministério responsável pela área laboral a admissão de menor efectuada nos termos dos n.os 1 e 2, nos oito dias subsequentes.
5 — Constitui contra-ordenação muito grave a violação do disposto no n.o 1, contra-ordenação grave a violação do disposto no n.o 3 e contra-ordenação leve a falta de comunicação prevista no número anterior.
6 — Em caso de admissão de menor com idade infe- rior a 16 anos e sem escolaridade obrigatória, é aplicada a sanção acessória de privação do direito a subsídio ou benefício outorgado por entidade ou serviço público, por período até dois anos.”

“Artigo 70.o
Capacidade do menor para celebrar contrato de trabalho e receber a retribuição
1 — É válido o contrato de trabalho celebrado por me- nor que tenha completado 16 anos de idade e tenha con- cluído a escolaridade obrigatória, salvo oposição escrita dos seus representantes legais.
2 — O contrato celebrado por menor que não tenha completado 16 anos de idade ou não tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória só é válido mediante autorização escrita dos seus representantes legais.
3 — O menor tem capacidade para receber a retribui- ção, salvo oposição escrita dos seus representantes legais.
4 — Os representantes legais podem a todo o tempo declarar a oposição ou revogar a autorização referida no n.o 2, sendo o acto eficaz decorridos 30 dias sobre a sua comunicação ao empregador. os
5 — No caso previsto nos n. 1 ou 2, os representantes legais podem reduzir até metade o prazo previsto no nú- mero anterior, com fundamento em que tal é necessário para a frequência de estabelecimento de ensino ou de acção de formação profissional.
6 — Constitui contra-ordenação grave o pagamento de retribuição ao menor caso haja oposição escrita dos seus representantes legais.”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Lei n.o 7/2009 de 12 de Fevereiro Aprova a revisão do Código do Trabalho

“Artigo 72.o
Protecção da segurança e saúde de menor
1 — Sem prejuízo das obrigações estabelecidas em dis- posições especiais, o empregador deve submeter o menor a exames de saúde, nomeadamente:

a) Exame de saúde que certifique a adequação da sua capacidade física e psíquica ao exercício das funções, a realizar antes do início da prestação do trabalho, ou nos 15 dias subsequentes à admissão se esta for urgente e com o consentimento dos representantes legais do menor;
b) Exame de saúde anual, para que do exercício da ac- tividade profissional não resulte prejuízo para a sua saúde e para o seu desenvolvimento físico e psíquico.

2 — Os trabalhos que, pela sua natureza ou pelas condi- ções em que são prestados, sejam prejudiciais ao desenvol- vimento físico, psíquico e moral dos menores são proibidos ou condicionados por legislação específica.
3 — Constitui contra-ordenação grave a violação do disposto no n.o 1.”

“Artigo 73.o
Limites máximos do período normal de trabalho de menor
Artigo 76.o
Trabalho de menor no período nocturno”

Trafico de pessoas

Codigo Penal, 1982

“Artigo 160.º

Tráfico de pessoas

1 – Quem oferecer, entregar, recrutar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoa para fins de exploração, incluindo a exploração sexual, a exploração do trabalho, a mendicidade, a escravidão, a extração de órgãos ou a exploração de outras atividades criminosas:

a) Por meio de violência, rapto ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) Com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se de incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da vítima ou
e) Mediante a obtenção do consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima;
é punido com pena de prisão de três a dez anos.

2 – A mesma pena é aplicada a quem, por qualquer meio, recrutar, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamento ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins de exploração, incluindo a exploração sexual, a exploração do trabalho, a mendicidade, a escravidão, a extração de órgãos, a adoção ou a exploração de outras atividades criminosas.
3 – No caso previsto no número anterior, se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do n.º 1 ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa, é punido com pena de prisão de três a doze anos.
4 – As penas previstas nos números anteriores são agravadas de um terço, nos seus limites mínimo e máximo, se a conduta neles referida:

a) Tiver colocado em perigo a vida da vítima;
b) Tiver sido cometida com especial violência ou tenha causado à vítima danos particularmente graves;
c) Tiver sido cometida por um funcionário no exercício das suas funções;
d) Tiver sido cometida no quadro de uma associação criminosa; ou
e) Tiver como resultado o suicídio da vítima.

5 – Quem, mediante pagamento ou outra contrapartida, oferecer, entregar, solicitar ou aceitar menor, ou obtiver ou prestar consentimento na sua adopção, é punido com pena de prisão de um a cinco anos.
6 – Quem, tendo conhecimento da prática de crime previsto nos n.os 1 e 2, utilizar os serviços ou órgãos da vítima é punido com pena de prisão de um a cinco anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
7 – Quem retiver, ocultar, danificar ou destruir documentos de identificação ou de viagem de pessoa vítima de crime previsto nos n.os 1 e 2 é punido com pena de prisão até três anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
8 – O consentimento da vítima dos crimes previstos nos números anteriores não exclui em caso algum a ilicitude do facto.”

Escravidão

Codigo Penal, 1982

“Artigo 159.º
Escravidão
Quem:

a) Reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo; ou
b) Alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa ou dela se apossar com a intenção de a manter na situação prevista na alínea anterior;
é punido com pena de prisão de 5 a 15 anos.”

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Lei n.o 7/2009 de 12 de Fevereiro Aprova a revisão do Código do Trabalho

“Artigo 556.o
Critérios especiais de medida da coima
1 — Os valores máximos das coimas aplicáveis a contra- -ordenações muito graves previstas no n.o 4 do artigo 554.o são elevados para o dobro em situação de violação de normas sobre trabalho de menores, segurança e saúde no trabalho, direitos de estruturas de representação colectiva dos trabalhadores e direito à greve.
2 — Em caso de pluralidade de agentes responsáveis pela mesma contra-ordenação é aplicável a coima corres- pondente à empresa com maior volume de negócios.”

“Artigo 82.o
Crime por utilização indevida de trabalho de menor
1 — A utilização de trabalho de menor em violação do disposto no n.o 1 do artigo 68.o ou no n.o 2 do artigo 72.o é punida com pena de prisão até 2 anos ou com pena de multa até 240 dias, se pena mais grave não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
2 — No caso de o menor não ter completado a idade mínima de admissão ou não ter concluído a escolaridade obrigatória, os limites das penas são elevados para o dobro.
3 — Em caso de reincidência, os limites mínimos das penas previstas nos números anteriores são elevados para o triplo.

Artigo 83.o
Crime de desobediência por não cessação da actividade de menor
Quando o serviço com competência inspectiva do mi- nistério responsável pela área laboral verificar a violação do disposto no n.o 1 do artigo 68.o ou das normas relativas a trabalhos proibidos a que se refere o n.o 2 do artigo 72.o, notifica por escrito o infractor para que faça cessar de imediato a actividade do menor, com a cominação de que, se o não fizer, incorre em crime de desobediência quali- ficada.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 1982

“Artigo 160.º

Tráfico de pessoas

1 – Quem oferecer, entregar, recrutar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoa para fins de exploração, incluindo a exploração sexual, a exploração do trabalho, a mendicidade, a escravidão, a extração de órgãos ou a exploração de outras atividades criminosas:

a) Por meio de violência, rapto ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) Com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se de incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da vítima ou
e) Mediante a obtenção do consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima;
é punido com pena de prisão de três a dez anos.

2 – A mesma pena é aplicada a quem, por qualquer meio, recrutar, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamento ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins de exploração, incluindo a exploração sexual, a exploração do trabalho, a mendicidade, a escravidão, a extração de órgãos, a adoção ou a exploração de outras atividades criminosas.
3 – No caso previsto no número anterior, se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do n.º 1 ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa, é punido com pena de prisão de três a doze anos.
4 – As penas previstas nos números anteriores são agravadas de um terço, nos seus limites mínimo e máximo, se a conduta neles referida:

a) Tiver colocado em perigo a vida da vítima;
b) Tiver sido cometida com especial violência ou tenha causado à vítima danos particularmente graves;
c) Tiver sido cometida por um funcionário no exercício das suas funções;
d) Tiver sido cometida no quadro de uma associação criminosa; ou
e) Tiver como resultado o suicídio da vítima.

5 – Quem, mediante pagamento ou outra contrapartida, oferecer, entregar, solicitar ou aceitar menor, ou obtiver ou prestar consentimento na sua adopção, é punido com pena de prisão de um a cinco anos.
6 – Quem, tendo conhecimento da prática de crime previsto nos n.os 1 e 2, utilizar os serviços ou órgãos da vítima é punido com pena de prisão de um a cinco anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
7 – Quem retiver, ocultar, danificar ou destruir documentos de identificação ou de viagem de pessoa vítima de crime previsto nos n.os 1 e 2 é punido com pena de prisão até três anos, se pena mais grave lhe não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
8 – O consentimento da vítima dos crimes previstos nos números anteriores não exclui em caso algum a ilicitude do facto.”

Penalties, Slavery

Codigo Penal, 1982

“Artigo 159.º
Escravidão
Quem:

a) Reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo; ou
b) Alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa ou dela se apossar com a intenção de a manter na situação prevista na alínea anterior;
é punido com pena de prisão de 5 a 15 anos.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Not signed

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Portugal. If you are a representative of Portugal and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.