Data Dashboards

San Marino
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Due to lack of nationally representative data, there is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

No data available

Data Availability
  • Child labour: No ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: No data available

Mean School Years: No data available

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: No data available

Working Poverty Rate: No data available

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2000
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2010
National Strategies

No national strategies

Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: No data

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

No nationally representative data is available on child labour prevalence in San Marino.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on ILO-SIMPOC methods and guidelines for defining, measuring and collecting data on child labour.

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in San Marino.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in San Marino.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

 

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Décret no 3 du 17 janvier 1995 portant ratification de la Convention no 29 de l’Organisation internationale du travail concernant le travail forcé ou obligatoire.

Décret no 4 du 17 janvier 1995 portant ratification de la Convention no 105 de l’Organisation internationale du travail concernant l’abolition du travail forcé.

Child Labour

Loi n° 91, loi cadre pour la promotion des politiques en faveur de la jeuneusse.

Décret no 5 du 17 janvier 1995 portant ratification de la Convention no 138 de l’Organisation internationale du travail concernant l’âge minimum d’admission à l’emploi.

Minimum age specified: 16 years

“”The minimum age for employment is 16 and the law excludes minors between the ages of 16 and 18 from the heaviest type of work. Minors are not allowed to work overtime and cannot work more than eight hours per day. The government effectively enforced child labor laws and devoted adequate resources and oversight to child labor policies. During the first 10 months of the year, the Office of the Labor Inspector did not report any cases of child labor.
The government effectively enforced laws and policies to protect children from exploitation in the workplace. Penalties were sufficient to deter violations.””

Human Trafficking

Prevention and Suppression of Violence Against Women and Gender, 2008

Art. 8 Human Trafficking, superceding Art. 168 of the Criminal Code

Codice Penale amend. Legge 97, 2008

“Art. 168
Tratta di persone
Chiunque commette tratta o fa altrimenti commercio di persona che si trova nelle condizioni di cui all’articolo 167, ovvero, al fine di ridurre o mantenere una persona in schiavitù o servitù, la induce mediante inganno o la costringe mediante violenza, minaccia, abuso d’autorità o approfittamento di una situazione di inferiorità fisica o psichica o di una situazione di necessità, o mediante promessa o dazione di somme di denaro o di altri vantaggi alla persona che su di essa ha autorità, a fare ingresso o a soggiornare o a uscire dal territorio dello Stato o a trasferirsi al suo interno, è punito con la prigionia di sesto grado e con l’interdizione di quarto grado.
La pena è aumentata di un grado se i fatti di cui al primo comma sono commessi in danno di minore degli anni diciotto o sono diretti allo sfruttamento della prostituzione o al fine di sottoporre la persona offesa al prelievo di organi.”

Slavery

Codice Penale amend. Legge 97, 2008

“Art. 167
Riduzione o mantenimento in schiavitù o servitù
Chiunque esercita su una persona poteri corrispondenti a quelli del diritto di proprietà ovvero chiunque riduce o mantiene una persona in uno stato di soggezione continuativa, costringendola a prestazioni lavorative o sessuali ovvero all’accattonaggio o comunque a prestazioni che ne comportano lo sfruttamento, è punito con la prigionia di quinto grado e con l’interdizione di quarto grado.
La riduzione o il mantenimento nello stato di schiavitù ha luogo quando la condotta è attuata mediante violenza, minaccia, inganno, abuso di autorità o approfittamento di una situazione di inferiorità fisica o psichica o di una situazione di necessità, o mediante la promessa o la dazione di somme di denaro o di altri vantaggi a chi ha autorità sulla persona.
La pena è aumentata di un grado se i fatti di cui al primo comma sono commessi in danno di minore degli anni diciotto o sono diretti allo sfruttamento della prostituzione o al fine di sottoporre la persona offesa al prelievo di organi.”

 

 

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, General

Legge 97 PREVENZIONE E REPRESSIONE DELLA VIOLENZA CONTRO LE DONNE E DI GENERE, 2008

“Art. 4
(Assistenza alle vittime di violenza)
Alle vittime della violenza familiare e sessuale lo Stato assicura:

a) l’informazione sulle misure previste dalla legge in ordine alla protezione, la sicurezza ed i diritti di assistenza e di soccorso delle vittime della violenza;
b) l’esistenza di servizi ai quali siano attribuite le relative competenze socio-assistenziali, dotati di personale specializzato, facilmente individuabili e raggiungibili dalle vittime;
c) che i servizi siano in grado di svolgere funzioni di pronto intervento anche psicologico e di successiva presa in carico delle situazioni a medio termine, anche ai fini della ricomposizione familiare;
d) la previsione di azioni di sostegno sociale, di protezione, di supporto all’istruzione, alla formazione e all’inserimento professionale;
e) nei casi più gravi, nei quali sia nociva la permanenza in famiglia, l’inserimento delle vittime in comunità di tipo familiare per un periodo sufficiente a realizzare un progetto di reinserimento sociale;
f) la predisposizione di programmi di protezione e di reinserimento sociale della vittima della violenza, qualora siano necessari, ivi compreso il soddisfacimento delle esigenze di alloggio ed il mantenimento del permesso di soggiorno, qualora nelle more del giudizio venisse a scadere, almeno per la durata del processo penale, il reinserimento professionale e le esigenze di cura e di sostegno dei figli a carico.
g) la formazione specifica dei giudici ai quali sono affidati i procedimenti giudiziari di cui alla presente legge e delle Forze dell’Ordine.
L’individuazione e l’organizzazione dei servizi e la determinazione in concreto delle misure sarà effettuata con apposito decreto delegato da emanarsi entro sei mesi dall’entrata in vigore della presente legge. “

“CAPO III
MISURE GIUDIZIARIE DI PROTEZIONE E SICUREZZA DELLE VITTIME
TITOLO I DISPOSIZIONI GENERALI
TITOLO II MISURE DI TUTELA NEL PROCESSO PENALE
TITOLO III MISURE DI TUTELA CIVILE
TITOLO IV INTERVENTI PREVENTIVI DA PARTE DELLE FORZE DELL’ORDINE ”

Legge 57 – Norme di adeguamento dell’Ordinamento Sammarinese alle disposizioni della Convenzione del Consiglio d’Europa sulla prevenzione e la lotta alla violenza contro le donne e la violenza domestica (Convenzione di Istanbul), 2016

Art.3 (Estensione delle misure di protezione e assistenza alle vittime) Le misure di protezione e assistenza di cui alla Legge 20 giugno 2008 n.97 devono intendersi estese a tutte le vittime di ogni forma di violenza rientranti nel campo di applicazione della Convenzione.

“Art.4 (Assistenza e recupero delle vittime) Ai sensi dell’articolo 4 della Legge n.97/2008, per far fronte alle specifiche esigenze di assistenza e recupero delle vittime sono assicurate, ove necessario, consulenze legali, sostegno psicologico, assistenza finanziaria, alloggio, istruzione, formazione e assistenza nella ricerca di un lavoro. Ad integrazione dei compiti previsti all’articolo 1 del Decreto Delegato 31 maggio 2012 n.60, all’Authority per le Pari Opportunità compete l’organizzazione e il coordinamento delle misure di assistenza garantite, mediante la stipulazione di appositi protocolli con: – l’Ordine degli Avvocati e Notai per la prestazione dei servizi di assistenza e consulenza anche nel campo stragiudiziale e per l’assistenza informativa sull’accesso ai canali utilizzabili per le denunce individuali e collettive; – le competenti strutture dell’ISS per l’erogazione di servizi di sostegno psicologico; – gli uffici deputati a fornire servizi e assistenza per l’accesso ai percorsi di istruzione, formazione e avviamento al lavoro; – adeguate strutture di accoglienza, per la sistemazione in idonei alloggi in situazione di emergenza. I servizi di assistenza e consulenza legale verranno prestati dagli esperti iscritti nell’elenco predisposto dall’Ordine degli Avvocati e Notai ai sensi del secondo comma dell’articolo 17 della Legge 20 giugno 2008 n.97.
Art.5 (Fondo per l’assistenza finanziaria alle vittime di violenza) Nel bilancio dello Stato, tra i capitoli di spesa di pertinenza del Dipartimento Affari Istituzionali e Giustizia, è istituito un Fondo per l’assistenza finanziaria alle vittime in dotazione all’Authority per le Pari Opportunità. L’Authority per le Pari Opportunità è l’ente deputato all’individuazione della necessità di erogare una congrua assistenza finanziaria alle vittime sulla base della disponibilità del Fondo ed in relazione alle specificità del caso. Possono accedere al Fondo le vittime di atti di violenza di cui alla Convenzione, consumati o tentati sul territorio della Repubblica, che siano cittadini sammarinesi, residenti o soggiornanti nel territorio della Repubblica e che versino in stato di difficoltà economica anche temporanea. L’Authority per le Pari Opportunità, accertata la necessità di cui al secondo comma del presente articolo, provvede alla tempestiva erogazione da parte del Dipartimento Affari Istituzionali e Giustizia.”

“Art.6 (Misure di protezione e supporto ai minori vittime di violenza assistita) Le misure di cui all’articolo 4, lettere b), c), d), e) ed f) della Legge 20 giugno 2008 n.97 nonché le misure di protezione e sostegno di cui alla presente legge, devono intendersi estese ai minori, testimoni di ogni forma di violenza rientrante nel campo di applicazione della Convenzione.
Art.7 (Riservatezza sull’identità dei soggetti denuncianti o segnalanti) Le Autorità giudiziarie e di polizia adottano attraverso Regolamento del Congresso di Stato misure adeguate a garantire la riservatezza sull’identità della persona fisica che ha segnalato o denunciato qualsiasi atto di violenza rientrante nel campo di applicazione della Convenzione.”

Art.8 (Risarcimento per mancata adozione di idonee misure di prevenzione e protezione) È riconosciuta alle vittime degli atti di violenza contemplati dalla Convenzione la facoltà di adire le competenti autorità giudiziarie per ottenere il risarcimento degli eventuali danni derivanti dalla mancata adozione, per dolo o colpa grave, da parte delle autorità statali delle misure di prevenzione o protezione, nell’ambito delle rispettive competenze, in relazione ai reati di cui alla Convenzione.

Codice Penale amend. Legge 97, 2008

“Art. 33
(Costringimento fisico)
Non è punibile chi ha commesso il fatto per esservi stato costretto da altri, mediante violenza fisica alla quale non poteva resistere o comunque sottrarsi.
In tal caso, del fatto commesso dalla persona costretta, risponde l’autore della violenza.

Art. 35
(Errore determinato dall’altrui inganno)
Se l’errore è stato determinato dall’altrui inganno si applicano le disposizioni precedenti, ma del fatto commesso dalla persona ingannata risponde chi l’ha determinata a commetterlo”

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Loi no 128 du 21 décembre 1989 portant sanctions administratives dans le cas de recrutement abusif des travailleurs

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Codice Penale amend. Legge 97, 2008

“Art. 168
Tratta di persone
Chiunque commette tratta o fa altrimenti commercio di persona che si trova nelle condizioni di cui all’articolo 167, ovvero, al fine di ridurre o mantenere una persona in schiavitù o servitù, la induce mediante inganno o la costringe mediante violenza, minaccia, abuso d’autorità o approfittamento di una situazione di inferiorità fisica o psichica o di una situazione di necessità, o mediante promessa o dazione di somme di denaro o di altri vantaggi alla persona che su di essa ha autorità, a fare ingresso o a soggiornare o a uscire dal territorio dello Stato o a trasferirsi al suo interno, è punito con la prigionia di sesto grado e con l’interdizione di quarto grado.
La pena è aumentata di un grado se i fatti di cui al primo comma sono commessi in danno di minore degli anni diciotto o sono diretti allo sfruttamento della prostituzione o al fine di sottoporre la persona offesa al prelievo di organi.”

Penalties, Slavery

Codice Penale amend. Legge 97, 2008

“Art. 167
Riduzione o mantenimento in schiavitù o servitù
Chiunque esercita su una persona poteri corrispondenti a quelli del diritto di proprietà ovvero chiunque riduce o mantiene una persona in uno stato di soggezione continuativa, costringendola a prestazioni lavorative o sessuali ovvero all’accattonaggio o comunque a prestazioni che ne comportano lo sfruttamento, è punito con la prigionia di quinto grado e con l’interdizione di quarto grado.
La riduzione o il mantenimento nello stato di schiavitù ha luogo quando la condotta è attuata mediante violenza, minaccia, inganno, abuso di autorità o approfittamento di una situazione di inferiorità fisica o psichica o di una situazione di necessità, o mediante la promessa o la dazione di somme di denaro o di altri vantaggi a chi ha autorità sulla persona.
La pena è aumentata di un grado se i fatti di cui al primo comma sono commessi in danno di minore degli anni diciotto o sono diretti allo sfruttamento della prostituzione o al fine di sottoporre la persona offesa al prelievo di organi.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Not signed

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from San Marino. If you are a representative of San Marino and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.