Data Dashboards

Sao Tome and Principe
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour data with a complete statistical definition is only provided for 2014. There is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.609 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.4 years (2018)

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 46.9% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: No data available

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2005
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Accession 2006
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): No data

Unemployed: No data

Pension: 52.5% (2016)

Vulnerable: No data

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Sao Tome and Principe, data on the percentage of child labourers is provided for 2014.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2014.

 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Sao Tome and Principe, the latest estimates show that 0.3 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014.

Only the measure provided for 2014 covers the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2014.  

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)). 

In Sao Tome and Principe, the latest estimates show that 2.9 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2014.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2014. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2014 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Sao Tome and Principe was 7.2 hours. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 10.1 hours in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2014. 

 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2014, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 5.9 hours per week. The average number of hours worked has decreased from 10.7 hours in 2000.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2014. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores  10.7 hours per week according to the 2014 estimate. This estimate represents an increase in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2000, which found that children aged 5-14 in Sao Tome and Principe worked an average of 7.0 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2000 and 2014. 

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Sao Tome and Principle.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Sao Tome and Principe.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Sao Tome and Principe between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Sao Tome and Principe is 0.609. This score indicates that human development is medium.

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Sao Tome and Principe over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Sao Tome and Principe showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Contitucion Politica, 1975

“Article 42: Rights of workers
1. All the workers have rights:

a) To recompense for work, according to quantity, nature and quality, observing the principal of equal salary for equal work, so as to guarantee a deserved living;
b) To labour-union freedom, as a means of promoting their unity, defending their legitimate rights and protecting their interests;
c) To the organisation of work in socially dignifying conditions, in order to facilitate personal accomplishment;
d) To be able to perform work in hygienic and safe conditions;
e) To a maximum limit to the work day, to weekly rest and to periodic paid holidays;
f) To strike, under terms to be regulated by law, taking into account the interests of the workers and of the national economy.”

Child Labour

Codigo Trabalho, 2019

“Artigo 268.º
Admissão ao trabalho
1. Só pode ser admitido a prestar trabalho, qualquer que seja a espécie e modalidade de pagamento, o menor que tenha completado a idade mínima de admissão, tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória e disponha de capacidades física e psíquicas adequadas ao posto de trabalho.
2. A idade mínima de admissão para prestar trabalho é de 15 anos.
3. O menor a partir de 14 anos que tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória pode prestar trabalhos leves que, pela natureza das tarefas ou pelas condições específicas em que são realizadas, não sejam susceptíveis de prejudicar a sua segurança e saúde, a sua assiduidade escolar, a sua participação em programas de orientação ou de formação e a sua capacidade para beneficiar da instrução ministrada, ou o seu desenvolvimento físico, psíquico, moral, intelectual e cultural em actividades e condições a determinar em legislação especial.
4. O empregador deve comunicar à Inspecção do Trabalho, nos oito dias subsequentes, a admissão de menor efectuada nos termos do número anterior.
5. Considera-se trabalho leve todo o trabalho cujo exercício não ponha em causa o desenvolvimento físico, psíquico ou mental do menor”

“Artigo 269.º
Admissão ao trabalho sem escolaridade obrigatória ou sem qualificação profissional
1. O menor com a idade inferior a 14 anos que tenha concluído a escolaridade obrigatória mas não possua uma qualificação profissional bem como o menor que tenha completado a idade mínima de admissão sem ter concluído a escolaridade obrigatória ou que não possua qualificação profissional só podem ser admitidos a prestar trabalho desde que se verifiquem cumulativamente as seguintes condições:

a) Frequente modalidade de educação ou formação que confira a escolaridade obrigatória e uma qualificação profissional, se não concluiu aquela, ou uma qualificação profissional, se concluiu a escolaridade;
b) Tratando-se de contrato de trabalho a termo, a sua duração não seja inferior à duração total da formação, se o empregador assumir a responsabilidade do processo formativo, ou permita realizar um período mínimo de formação, se esta responsabilidade estiver a cargo de outra entidade;
c) O período normal de trabalho inclua uma parte reserva à formação correspondente a pelo menos 40% do limite máximo constante da lei, da regulamentação colectiva aplicável ou do período praticado a tempo completa, na respectiva categoria;
d) O horário de trabalho possibilite a participação nos programas de educação ou formação profissional.

2. O disposto no número anterior não é aplicável ao menor que apenas preste trabalho durante as férias escolares.
3. O empregador deve comunicar à Inspecção Geral do Trabalho, nos oito dias subsequentes, a admissão de menores efectuada nos termos do número anterior.”

Lei No. 6/2019, of November 16, 2018

CHAPTER VIII: Child labor

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Codigo Trabalho, 2019

“Artigo 273.º
Garantias de protecção da saúde e educação
1. Sem prejuízo das obrigações estabelecidas em disposições especiais, o empregador deve submeter o trabalhador menor a exames médicos para garantia da sua segurança e saúde, nomeadamente:

a) Exame de saúde que certifique a sua capacidade física e psíquica adequada ao exercício das funções, a realizar antes do início da prestação do trabalho, ou até 15 dias depois da admissão
se esta for urgente e com o consentimento dos representantes legais do menor;
b) Exame médico semestral, para prevenir que do exercício da actividade profissional não resulte prejuízo para a sua saúde e para o seu desenvolvimento físico e mental.

2. A prestação de trabalho que, pela sua natureza ou pelas condições em que são prestados, sejam prejudiciais ao desenvolvimento físico, psíquico e moral dos menores é proibida.”

“Artigo 276.º
Dispensa de horários de trabalho com adaptabilidade
O trabalhador menor tem direito a dispensa de horários de trabalho organizados de acordo com o regime de adaptabilidade do tempo de trabalho se for apresentado atestado médico do qual conste que tal prática pode prejudicar a sua saúde ou segurança no trabalho.

Artigo 277.º
Proibição do trabalho suplementar
O trabalhador menor não pode prestar trabalho suplementar.

Artigo 278.º
Trabalho no período nocturno
1. É proibido o trabalho de menor com idade inferior a 16 anos entre as 18 horas de um dia as seis horas do dia seguinte.
2. O menor com idade igual ou superior a 16 anos não pode prestar trabalho entre as 22 horas de um dia e as sete horas do dia seguinte, sem prejuízo do disposto no n.º 3.
3. Por instrumento de regulamentação colectiva de trabalho o menor com idade igual ou superior a 16 anos pode prestar trabalho nocturno em sectores de actividade específicos, excepto no período compreendido entre as zero horas e as cinco horas.
4. O menor com idade igual ou superior a 16 anos pode prestar trabalho nocturno, incluindo o período compreendido entre as zero horas e as cinco horas, sempre que tal se justifique por motivos objectivos, em actividades de natureza cultural, artística, desportiva ou publicitária, desde que lhe seja concedido um descanso compensatório com igual número de horas, a gozar no dia seguinte exceptuando-se nos dias feriados e domingos, que transitará para o dia útil seguinte.
5. Nos casos dos n.ºs 3 e 4, o menor deve ser vigiado por um adulto durante a prestação do trabalho nocturno, se essa vigilância for necessária para protecção da sua segurança ou saúde.
6. O disposto nos n.os 2, 3 e 4 não é aplicável se a prestação de trabalho nocturno por parte de menor com idade igual ou superior a 16 anos for indispensável, devido a factos anormais e imprevisíveis ou a circunstâncias excepcionais ainda que previsíveis, cujas consequências não podiam ser evitadas, desde que não haja outros trabalhadores disponíveis e por um período não superior a cinco dias úteis.
7. Nas situações referidas no número anterior, o menor tem direito a descanso compensatório com igual número de horas, a gozar durante as três semanas seguintes.”

Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 2012

“Artigo 160. [Tráfico de pessoas para exploração do trabalho]
1. Quem oferecer, entregar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoas para fins de exploração de trabalho:

a) Por meio de violência, rapto ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se de incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da ví- tima, ou mediante a obtenção do consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima é punido com pena de prisão de 2 a 8 anos.

2. na mesma pena incorre quem, por qualquer meio, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamen- to ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins de exploração de tra- balho.
3. no caso previsto no no anterior se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do n.o1, ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa, ou se a vítima for menor de 16 anos, é punido com pena de prisão de 3 a 10 anos.
4. se os factos supra referidos forem praticados pelos representantes ou órgãos de pessoa co- lectiva ou equiparada, em nome destas e no interesse colectivo, são as mesmas responsáveis criminalmente, sendo puníveis em pena de multa a fixar entre 10 milhões e 500 milhões de dobras, podendo ainda ser decretada a sua dissolução.”

Slavery

Codigo Penal, 2012

“Artigo 159. [Escravidão]
1. Quem reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo é punido com prisão de 8 a 15 anos.
2. na mesma pena incorre quem alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa humana ou dela apossar com intenção de a manter na situação prevista no número anterior.”

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the  perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, General

Lei 12/2008

Penalties
Penalties, Child Labour

Codigo Trabalho, 2019

“Artigo 536.º
Utilização indevida de trabalho de menor
1. A utilização indevida de trabalho de menor em violação do disposto no nº 1 do artigo 268.º e do nº 2 do artigo 273.º é punida com pena de prisão até dois anos ou com pena de multa até 240 dias, se pena mais grave não couber por força de outra disposição legal.
2. No caso de o menor não ter ainda completado a idade mínima de admissão nem ter concluído a escolaridade obrigatória, os limites das penas são elevados para o dobro.
3. No caso de reincidência, os limites mínimos das penas previstas nos números anteriores são elevados para o triplo.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Codigo Penal, 2012

“Artigo 160. [Tráfico de pessoas para exploração do trabalho]
1. Quem oferecer, entregar, aliciar, aceitar, transportar, alojar ou acolher pessoas para fins de exploração de trabalho:

a) Por meio de violência, rapto ou ameaça grave;
b) Através de ardil ou manobra fraudulenta;
c) com abuso de autoridade resultante de uma relação de dependência hierárquica, económica, de trabalho ou familiar;
d) Aproveitando-se de incapacidade psíquica ou de situação de especial vulnerabilidade da ví- tima, ou mediante a obtenção do consentimento da pessoa que tem o controlo sobre a vítima é punido com pena de prisão de 2 a 8 anos.

2. na mesma pena incorre quem, por qualquer meio, aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamen- to ou acolhimento de menor, ou o entregar, oferecer ou aceitar, para fins de exploração de tra- balho.
3. no caso previsto no no anterior se o agente utilizar qualquer dos meios previstos nas alíneas do n.o1, ou actuar profissionalmente ou com intenção lucrativa, ou se a vítima for menor de 16 anos, é punido com pena de prisão de 3 a 10 anos.
4. se os factos supra referidos forem praticados pelos representantes ou órgãos de pessoa co- lectiva ou equiparada, em nome destas e no interesse colectivo, são as mesmas responsáveis criminalmente, sendo puníveis em pena de multa a fixar entre 10 milhões e 500 milhões de dobras, podendo ainda ser decretada a sua dissolução.”

“Artigo 172. [Tráfico de pessoas para a prática de prostituição]
Quem, por meio de violência, ameaça grave, ardil ou manobra fraudulenta, levar outra pessoa à prática, em país estrangeiro da prostituição ou de actos sexuais de relevo, é punido com pena de prisão de 2 a 8 anos.”

“ARTIGO 181.o [Lenocínio e tráfico de menores]
1. Quem fomentar, favorecer ou facilitar o exercício da prostituição de menor de 18 anos ou a prática por este de actos sexuais de relevo, é punido com pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos.
2. Quem aliciar, transportar, proceder ao alojamento ou acolhimento de menor de 18 anos, ou propiciar as condições para a prática por este, em país estrangeiro, da prostituição ou de actos sexuais de relevo, é punido com prisão de 2 a 8 anos.
3. se o agente usar de violência, ameaça grave, ardil, manobra fraudulenta, abuso de autoridade resultante de relação de dependência hierárquica, económica ou de trabalho, actuar profissio- nalmente ou com intenção lucrativa, ou se aproveitar de incapacidade psíquica da vítima, ou de qualquer outra situação que configure especial vulnerabilidade, ou ainda se esta for menor de 16 anos, é punido com pena de prisão de 3 a 10 anos.”

Penalties, General

Codigo Penal, 2012

“Artigo 161. [Comercialização de pessoa]
1. Quem alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa, por qualquer meio e a qualquer título, nomeadamen- te para fins de exploração sexual ou extracção de órgãos, é punido com pena de prisão de 5 a 15 anos.
2. Quem alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa dominado por compaixão, desespero ou motivo de relevante valor social ou moral, que diminuam sensivelmente a sua culpa, é punido com pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos.
3. Quem obtiver ou der consentimento na adopção de menor mediante pagamento ou compen- sação de qualquer espécie, ou quem, a título de intermediário, induza a prestação do consenti- mento necessário à adopção de menor em violação grave das normas legais aplicáveis, é punido com uma pena de prisão de 1 a 5 anos.
4. se os factos supra referidos em 1, 2 e 3 forem praticados pelos representantes ou órgãos de pessoa colectiva ou equiparada, em nome destas e no interesse colectivo, são as mesmas res- ponsáveis criminalmente, sendo puníveis em pena de multa a fixar entre 10 milhões e 500 mi- lhões de dobras, podendo ainda ser decretada a sua dissolução.”

Penalties, Slavery

Codigo Penal, 2012

“1. Quem reduzir outra pessoa ao estado ou à condição de escravo é punido com prisão de 8 a 15 anos.
2. na mesma pena incorre quem alienar, ceder ou adquirir pessoa humana ou dela apossar com intenção de a manter na situação prevista no número anterior.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Not signed

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Sao Tome and Principe. If you are a representative of Sao Tome and Principe and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.