Datos de los paneles

Spain
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Due to lack of nationally representative child labour data, there is no change to report.

%
Best Target 8.7 Data: Human Trafficking

The data visualization displays the number of identified victims of human trafficking per year in Spain. Detailed information is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: No ILO/UNICEF data
  • Human trafficking: Case data available
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.893 (2018)

Mean School Years: 9.8 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 11.3% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: No data available

Government Efforts
International Aid Commitments

Total Development Assistance to Anti-Slavery (2000-2013):

97,171,052 USD

Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Ratified 2017
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Ratified 2002
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 80.9% (2016)

Unemployed: 37.1% (2014)

Pension: 66.3% (2014)

Vulnerable: 45.0% (2016)

Children: 100% (2016)

Disabled: 83.5% (2016)

Poor: 100% (2016)

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Youth employment in Spain is permitted only to those ages 16 and up, and is regulated by the Labour Statute of 1980. There is no data available on child labour in Spain, most likely due to relatively low incidence.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on ILO-SIMPOC methods and guidelines for defining, measuring and collecting data on child labour.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

Identified Victims of Human Trafficking (Source: GRETA)

According to the European Commission, Spain is primarily a destination country for victims of human trafficking, but there have been cases where it’s a transit country to other countries, namely France and the United Kingdom. Migrants are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, and the process often begins in their countries of origin. Sex trafficking is the most prevalent form of trafficking in Spain.

The graph on the right shows the number of identified victims of human trafficking per year in Spain, as reported by Spanish authorities to the Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA).

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Spain between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Spain is 0.893. This score indicates that human development is very high. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Spain over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Spain showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Rates of Non-fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Occupational injury and fatality data can also be crucial in prevention and response efforts. 

As the ILO explains:

“Data on occupational injuries are essential for planning preventive measures. For instance, workers in occupations and activities of highest risk can be targeted more effectively for inspection visits, development of regulations and procedures, and also for safety campaigns.”

There are serious gaps in existing data coverage, particularly among groups that may be highly vulnerable to labour exploitation. For example, few countries provide information on injuries disaggregated between migrant and non-migrant workers.

 

Rates of Fatal Occupational Injuries (Source: ILO)

Data on occupational health and safety may reveal conditions of exploitation, even if exploitation may lead to under-reporting of workplace injuries and safety breaches. At present, the ILO collects data on occupational injuries, both fatal and non-fatal, disaggregating by sex and migrant status.

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Spain.

Underdevelopment influences and is influenced by Target 8.7 forms of exploitation. This suggests an important role for development assistance and programming in addressing these issues.

Yearly ODA Commitments to Anti-Slavery (Data Source: UNU-CPR)

A recent report released by UNU-CPR attempts to size ODA contributions that focus on tackling SDG 8.7 forms of exploitation. Spain committed 97,171,052 USD between 2000 and 2013 on anti-slavery programming. Annual commitments fluctuate, though it is important to note that commitments at any point in time may be dispersed over the course of several years. The chart also depicts the percentage of Spain’s GNI contributed to ODA. It should also be noted that this count does not include non-ODA assistance, domestic expenditure, or the growing flows of charitable giving directed at these concerns. The data source provides information up to 2013.

More current data may show a significant increase in spending on this programming, especially after the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in 2015 and the Call to Action in 2017.

ODA Commitments by Form of Exploitation (Data Source: UNU-CPR)

Disaggregating ODA commitments by forms of exploitation using terms listed in each project description can provide a sense of the way aid is being spent on the various issues.

The graph shows that ODA commitments to Target 8.7 issues by Spain between 2000 and 2013 were diverse. Spending was primarily directed towards combatting forced labour and child labour. Programming to combat human trafficking has also received significant attention.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Child Labour

Real Decreto Legislativo 2/2015, de 23 de octubre, por el que se aprueba el texto refundido de la Ley del Estatuto de los Trabajadores

“Artículo 6. Trabajo de los menores.
1. Se prohíbe la admisión al trabajo a los menores de dieciséis años”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

Real Decreto Legislativo 2/2015, de 23 de octubre, por el que se aprueba el texto refundido de la Ley del Estatuto de los Trabajadores

“Artículo 6. Trabajo de los menores.
2. Los trabajadores menores de dieciocho años no podrán realizar trabajos nocturnos ni
aquellas actividades o puestos de trabajo respecto a los que se establezcan limitaciones a
su contratación conforme a lo dispuesto en la Ley 31/1995, de 8 de noviembre, de
Prevención de Riesgos Laborales, y en las normas reglamentarias aplicables.
3. Se prohíbe realizar horas extraordinarias a los menores de dieciocho años.
4. La intervención de los menores de dieciséis años en espectáculos públicos solo se
autorizará en casos excepcionales por la autoridad laboral, siempre que no suponga peligro
para su salud ni para su formación profesional y humana. El permiso deberá constar por
escrito y para actos determinados.”

Decreto de 26 de julio de 1957 sobre Industrias y Trabajos prohibidos a mujeres y menores por peligrosos e insalubres

Trata de seres humanos

Ley Orgánica 10/1995, de 23 de noviembre, del Código Penal

“Artículo 177 bis.
1. Será castigado con la pena de cinco a ocho años de prisión como reo de trata de seres humanos el que, sea en territorio español, sea desde España, en tránsito o con destino a ella, empleando violencia, intimidación o engaño, o abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad o de vulnerabilidad de la víctima nacional o extranjera, o mediante la entrega o recepción de pagos o beneficios para lograr el consentimiento de la persona que poseyera el control sobre la víctima, la captare, transportare, trasladare, acogiere, o recibiere, incluido el intercambio o transferencia de control sobre esas personas, con cualquiera de las finalidades siguientes:

a) La imposición de trabajo o de servicios forzados, la esclavitud o prácticas similares a la esclavitud, a la servidumbre o a la mendicidad.
b) La explotación sexual, incluyendo la pornografía.
c) La explotación para realizar actividades delictivas.
d) La extracción de sus órganos corporales.
e) La celebración de matrimonios forzados.
Existe una situación de necesidad o vulnerabilidad cuando la persona en cuestión no tiene otra alternativa, real o aceptable, que someterse al abuso.

2. Aun cuando no se recurra a ninguno de los medios enunciados en el apartado anterior, se considerará trata de seres humanos cualquiera de las acciones indicadas en el apartado anterior cuando se llevare a cabo respecto de menores de edad con fines de explotación.
3. El consentimiento de una víctima de trata de seres humanos será irrelevante cuando se haya recurrido a alguno de los medios indicados en el apartado primero de este artículo.
4. Se impondrá la pena superior en grado a la prevista en el apartado primero de este artículo cuando:

a) se hubiera puesto en peligro la vida o la integridad física o psíquica de las personas objeto del delito;
b) la víctima sea especialmente vulnerable por razón de enfermedad, estado gestacional, discapacidad o situación personal, o sea menor de edad.

Si concurriere más de una circunstancia se impondrá la pena en su mitad superior.”

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Assistance, Human Trafficking

Ley Orgánica 10/1995, de 23 de noviembre, del Código Penal

“Artículo 177 bis.
11. Sin perjuicio de la aplicación de las reglas generales de este Código, la víctima de trata de seres humanos quedará exenta de pena por las infracciones penales que haya cometido en la situación de explotación sufrida, siempre que su participación en ellas haya sido consecuencia directa de la situación de violencia, intimidación, engaño o abuso a que haya sido sometida y que exista una adecuada proporcionalidad entre dicha situación y el hecho criminal realizado.”

Ley Orgánica 4/2000 de 11 de enero sobre derechos y libertades de los extranjeros en España y su integración social

“Artículo 59 Colaboración contra redes organizadas.
1. El extranjero que se encuentre irregularmente en España y sea víctima, perjudicado o testigo de un acto de tráfico ilícito de seres humanos, inmigración ilegal, explotación laboral o de tráfico ilícito de mano de obra o de explotación en la prostitución abusando de su situación de necesidad, podrá quedar exento de responsabilidad administrativa y no será expulsado si denuncia a los autores o cooperadores de dicho tráfico, o coopera y colabora con las autoridades competentes, proporcionando datos esenciales o testificando, en su caso, en el proceso correspondiente contra aquellos autores.
2. Los órganos administrativos competentes encargados de la instrucción del expediente sancionador informarán a la persona interesada sobre las previsiones del presente artículo a fin de que decida si desea acogerse a esta vía, y harán la propuesta oportuna a la autoridad que deba resolver, que podrá conceder una autorización provisional de residencia y trabajo a favor del extranjero, según el procedimiento previsto reglamentariamente.
El instructor del expediente sancionador informará de las actuaciones en relación con este apartado a la autoridad encargada de la instrucción del procedimiento penal.
3. A los extranjeros que hayan quedado exentos de responsabilidad administrativa se les podrá facilitar, a su elección, el retorno asistido a su país de procedencia o la autorización de residencia y trabajo por circunstancias excepcionales, y facilidades para su integración social, de acuerdo con lo establecido en la presente Ley velando, en su caso, por su seguridad y protección.
4. Cuando el Ministerio Fiscal tenga conocimiento de que un extranjero, contra el que se ha dictado una resolución de expulsión, aparezca en un procedimiento penal como víctima, perjudicado o testigo y considere imprescindible su presencia para la práctica de diligencias judiciales, lo pondrá de manifiesto a la autoridad gubernativa competente para que valore la inejecución de su expulsión y, en el supuesto de que se hubiese ejecutado esta última, se procederá de igual forma a los efectos de que autorice su regreso a España durante el tiempo necesario para poder practicar las diligencias precisas, sin perjuicio de que se puedan adoptar algunas de las medidas previstas en la Ley Orgánica 19/1994, de 23 de diciembre, de protección a testigos y peritos en causas criminales.
5. Las previsiones del presente artículo serán igualmente de aplicación a extranjeros menores de edad, debiendo tenerse en cuenta en el procedimiento la edad y madurez de éstos y, en todo caso, la prevalencia del principio del interés superior del menor.
6. Reglamentariamente se desarrollarán las condiciones de colaboración de las organizaciones no gubernamentales sin ánimo de lucro que tengan por objeto la acogida y protección de las víctimas de los delitos señalados en el apartado primero.”

“Artículo 59 bis Víctimas de la trata de seres humanos.
1. Las autoridades competentes adoptarán las medidas necesarias para la identificación de las víctimas de la trata de personas conforme a lo previsto en el artículo 10 del Convenio del Consejo de Europa sobre la lucha contra la trata de seres humanos, de 16 de mayo de 2005.
2. Los órganos administrativos competentes, cuando estimen que existen motivos razonables para creer que una persona extranjera en situación irregular ha sido víctima de trata de seres humanos, informarán a la persona interesada sobre las previsiones del presente artículo y elevarán a la autoridad competente para su resolución la oportuna propuesta sobre la concesión de un período de restablecimiento y reflexión, de acuerdo con el procedimiento previsto reglamentariamente.
Dicho período de restablecimiento y reflexión tendrá una duración de, al menos, noventa días, y deberá ser suficiente para que la víctima pueda decidir si desea cooperar con las autoridades en la investigación del delito y, en su caso, en el procedimiento penal. Tanto durante la fase de identificación de las víctimas, como durante el período de restablecimiento y reflexión, no se incoará un expediente sancionador por infracción del artículo 53.1.a) y se suspenderá el expediente administrativo sancionador que se le hubiere incoado o, en su caso, la ejecución de la expulsión o devolución eventualmente acordadas. Asimismo, durante el período de restablecimiento y reflexión, se le autorizará la estancia temporal y las administraciones competentes velarán por la subsistencia y, de resultar necesario, la seguridad y protección de la víctima y de sus hijos menores de edad o con discapacidad, que se encuentren en España en el momento de la identificación, a quienes se harán extensivas las previsiones del apartado 4 del presente artículo en relación con el retorno asistido o la autorización de residencia, y en su caso trabajo, si fueren mayores de 16 años, por circunstancias excepcionales. Finalizado el período de reflexión las administraciones públicas competentes realizarán una evaluación de la situación personal de la víctima a efectos de determinar una posible ampliación del citado período.
Con carácter extraordinario la Administración Pública competente velará por la seguridad y protección de aquellas otras personas, que se encuentren en España, con las que la víctima tenga vínculos familiares o de cualquier otra naturaleza, cuando se acredite que la situación de desprotección en que quedarían frente a los presuntos traficantes constituye un obstáculo insuperable para que la víctima acceda a cooperar.
3. El periodo de restablecimiento y reflexión podrá denegarse o ser revocado por motivos de orden público o cuando se tenga conocimiento de que la condición de víctima se ha invocado de forma indebida. La denegación o revocación deberán estar motivadas y podrán ser recurridas según lo establecido en la Ley 30/1992, de 26 de noviembre, de Régimen Jurídico de las Administraciones Públicas y del Procedimiento Administrativo Común.
4. La autoridad competente podrá declarar a la víctima exenta de responsabilidad administrativa y podrá facilitarle, a su elección, el retorno asistido a su país de procedencia o la autorización de residencia y trabajo por circunstancias excepcionales cuando lo considere necesario a causa de su cooperación para los fines de investigación o de las acciones penales, o en atención a su situación personal, y facilidades para su integración social, de acuerdo con lo establecido en la presente Ley. Asimismo, en tanto se resuelva el procedimiento de autorización de residencia y trabajo por circunstancias excepcionales, se le podrá facilitar una autorización provisional de residencia y trabajo en los términos que se determinen reglamentariamente.
En la tramitación de las autorizaciones referidas en el párrafo anterior se podrá eximir de la aportación de aquellos documentos cuya obtención suponga un riesgo para la víctima.
5. Las previsiones del presente artículo serán igualmente de aplicación a personas extranjeras menores de edad, debiendo tenerse en cuenta la edad y madurez de éstas y, en todo caso, la prevalencia del interés superior del menor.
6. Reglamentariamente se desarrollarán las condiciones de colaboración de las organizaciones no gubernamentales sin ánimo de lucro que tengan por objeto la acogida y protección de las víctimas de la trata de seres humanos. ”

“Artículo 59 Colaboración contra redes organizadas.
1. El extranjero que se encuentre irregularmente en España y sea víctima, perjudicado o testigo de un acto de tráfico ilícito de seres humanos, inmigración ilegal, explotación laboral o de tráfico ilícito de mano de obra o de explotación en la prostitución abusando de su situación de necesidad, podrá quedar exento de responsabilidad administrativa y no será expulsado si denuncia a los autores o cooperadores de dicho tráfico, o coopera y colabora con las autoridades competentes, proporcionando datos esenciales o testificando, en su caso, en el proceso correspondiente contra aquellos autores.
2. Los órganos administrativos competentes encargados de la instrucción del expediente sancionador informarán a la persona interesada sobre las previsiones del presente artículo a fin de que decida si desea acogerse a esta vía, y harán la propuesta oportuna a la autoridad que deba resolver, que podrá conceder una autorización provisional de residencia y trabajo a favor del extranjero, según el procedimiento previsto reglamentariamente.
El instructor del expediente sancionador informará de las actuaciones en relación con este apartado a la autoridad encargada de la instrucción del procedimiento penal.
3. A los extranjeros que hayan quedado exentos de responsabilidad administrativa se les podrá facilitar, a su elección, el retorno asistido a su país de procedencia o la autorización de residencia y trabajo por circunstancias excepcionales, y facilidades para su integración social, de acuerdo con lo establecido en la presente Ley velando, en su caso, por su seguridad y protección.
4. Cuando el Ministerio Fiscal tenga conocimiento de que un extranjero, contra el que se ha dictado una resolución de expulsión, aparezca en un procedimiento penal como víctima, perjudicado o testigo y considere imprescindible su presencia para la práctica de diligencias judiciales, lo pondrá de manifiesto a la autoridad gubernativa competente para que valore la inejecución de su expulsión y, en el supuesto de que se hubiese ejecutado esta última, se procederá de igual forma a los efectos de que autorice su regreso a España durante el tiempo necesario para poder practicar las diligencias precisas, sin perjuicio de que se puedan adoptar algunas de las medidas previstas en la Ley Orgánica 19/1994, de 23 de diciembre, de protección a testigos y peritos en causas criminales
5. Las previsiones del presente artículo serán igualmente de aplicación a extranjeros menores de edad, debiendo tenerse en cuenta en el procedimiento la edad y madurez de éstos y, en todo caso, la prevalencia del principio del interés superior del menor.
6. Reglamentariamente se desarrollarán las condiciones de colaboración de las organizaciones no gubernamentales sin ánimo de lucro que tengan por objeto la acogida y protección de las víctimas de los delitos señalados en el apartado primero.”

Ley 4/2015, de 17 de abril, del Estatuto de la Víctima del Delito

Real Decreto Ley 3/2013, de 22 de febrero, por el que se modifica la Ley 1/1996, de 10 de enero, de asistencia jurídica gratuita

Ley 19/1994, de 23 de diciembre, de protección a testigos y peritos en causas criminales

Ley 35/1995, de 11 de diciembre, de Ayuda y Asistencia a Víctimas de Delitos Violentos y Contra la Libertad Sexual

Penalties
Penalties, General

Ley Orgánica 10/1995, de 23 de noviembre, del Código Penal

“Artículo 311. De los delitos contra los derechos de los trabajadores
Serán castigados con las penas de prisión de seis meses a seis años y multa de seis a doce meses:
1.o Los que, mediante engaño o abuso de situación de necesidad, impongan a los trabajadores a su servicio condiciones laborales o de Seguridad Social que perjudiquen, supriman o restrinjan los derechos que tengan reconocidos por disposiciones legales, convenios colectivos o contrato individual.”

“Artículo 312.
1. Serán castigados con las penas de prisión de dos a cinco años y multa de seis a doce meses, los que trafiquen de manera ilegal con mano de obra.
2. En la misma pena incurrirán quienes recluten personas o las determinen a abandonar su puesto de trabajo ofreciendo empleo o condiciones de trabajo engañosas o falsas, y quienes empleen a súbditos extranjeros sin permiso de trabajo en condiciones que perjudiquen, supriman o restrinjan los derechos que tuviesen reconocidos por disposiciones legales, convenios colectivos o contrato individual.”

Penalties, Child Labour

Ley Orgánica 10/1995, de 23 de noviembre, del Código Penal

“Artículo 311 bis.
Será castigado con la pena de prisión de tres a dieciocho meses o multa de doce a treinta meses, salvo que los hechos estén castigados con una pena más grave en otro precepto de este Código, quien:

a) De forma reiterada, emplee o dé ocupación a ciudadanos extranjeros que carezcan de permiso de trabajo, o
b) emplee o dé ocupación a un menor de edad que carezca de permiso de trabajo.”

Penalties, Human Trafficking

Ley Orgánica 10/1995, de 23 de noviembre, del Código Penal

“Artículo 177 bis. De la trata de seres humanos
1. Será castigado con la pena de cinco a ocho años de prisión como reo de trata de seres humanos el que, sea en territorio español, sea desde España, en tránsito o con destino a ella, empleando violencia, intimidación o engaño, o abusando de una situación de superioridad o de necesidad o de vulnerabilidad de la víctima nacional o extranjera, o mediante la entrega o recepción de pagos o beneficios para lograr el consentimiento de la persona que poseyera el control sobre la víctima, la captare, transportare, trasladare, acogiere, o recibiere, incluido el intercambio o transferencia de control sobre esas personas, con cualquiera de las finalidades siguientes:

a) La imposición de trabajo o de servicios forzados, la esclavitud o prácticas similares a la esclavitud, a la servidumbre o a la mendicidad.
b) La explotación sexual, incluyendo la pornografía.
c) La explotación para realizar actividades delictivas.
d) La extracción de sus órganos corporales.
e) La celebración de matrimonios forzados.
Existe una situación de necesidad o vulnerabilidad cuando la persona en cuestión no tiene otra alternativa, real o aceptable, que someterse al abuso.

2. Aun cuando no se recurra a ninguno de los medios enunciados en el apartado anterior, se considerará trata de seres humanos cualquiera de las acciones indicadas en el apartado anterior cuando se llevare a cabo respecto de menores de edad con fines de explotación.
3. El consentimiento de una víctima de trata de seres humanos será irrelevante cuando se haya recurrido a alguno de los medios indicados en el apartado primero de este artículo.
4. Se impondrá la pena superior en grado a la prevista en el apartado primero de este artículo cuando:

a) se hubiera puesto en peligro la vida o la integridad física o psíquica de las personas objeto del delito;
b) la víctima sea especialmente vulnerable por razón de enfermedad, estado gestacional, discapacidad o situación personal, o sea menor de edad.
Si concurriere más de una circunstancia se impondrá la pena en su mitad superior.

5. Se impondrá la pena superior en grado a la prevista en el apartado 1 de este artículo e inhabilitación absoluta de seis a doce años a los que realicen los hechos prevaliéndose de su condición de autoridad, agente de ésta o funcionario público. Si concurriere además alguna de las circunstancias previstas en el apartado 4 de este artículo se impondrán las penas en su mitad superior.
6. Se impondrá la pena superior en grado a la prevista en el apartado 1 de este artículo e inhabilitación especial para profesión, oficio, industria o comercio por el tiempo de la condena, cuando el culpable perteneciera a una organización o asociación de más de dos personas, incluso de carácter transitorio, que se dedicase a la realización de tales actividades. Si concurriere alguna de las circunstancias previstas en el apartado 4 de este artículo se impondrán las penas en la mitad superior. Si concurriere la circunstancia prevista en el apartado 5 de este artículo se impondrán las penas señaladas en este en su mitad superior.
Cuando se trate de los jefes, administradores o encargados de dichas organizaciones o asociaciones, se les aplicará la pena en su mitad superior, que podrá elevarse a la inmediatamente superior en grado. En todo caso se elevará la pena a la inmediatamente superior en grado si concurriera alguna de las circunstancias previstas en el apartado 4 o la circunstancia prevista en el apartado 5 de este artículo.
7. Cuando de acuerdo con lo establecido en el artículo 31 bis una persona jurídica sea responsable de los delitos comprendidos en este artículo, se le impondrá la pena de multa del triple al quíntuple del beneficio obtenido. Atendidas las reglas establecidas en el artículo 66 bis, los jueces y tribunales podrán asimismo imponer las penas recogidas en las letras b) a g) del apartado 7 del artículo 33.
8. La provocación, la conspiración y la proposición para cometer el delito de trata de seres humanos serán castigadas con la pena inferior en uno o dos grados a la del delito correspondiente.
9. En todo caso, las penas previstas en este artículo se impondrán sin perjuicio de las que correspondan, en su caso, por el delito del artículo 318 bis de este Código y demás delitos efectivamente cometidos, incluidos los constitutivos de la correspondiente explotación.
10. Las condenas de jueces o tribunales extranjeros por delitos de la misma naturaleza que los previstos en este artículo producirán los efectos de reincidencia, salvo que el antecedente penal haya sido cancelado o pueda serlo con arreglo al Derecho español.”

National Statistical Office

Instituto Nacional de Estadistica

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Signed 2017

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Unemployed
Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Poor
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Spain. If you are a representative of Spain and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.