Data Dashboards

Uganda
Measurement
Measuring the Change

using prevalence data providing the widest temporal coverage of the most complete and comparable measures available by ICLS standards.

Child labour between 2002 and 2012 increased by 77%

+77%

2002- 2012

Best Target 8.7 Data: Child Labour Rate

The data visualization displays yearly child labour statistics based on a variety of nationally-representative household surveys. All years of data hold up to standards set by interagency collaboration between ILO, UNICEF and World Bank, though, in some cases are not perfectly comparable between years. Detailed information on each data point is provided in the Measurement tab (above).

Data Availability
  • Child labour: ILO/UNICEF data
  • Forced labour: No nationally representative data
  • Human trafficking: No nationally representative data
Context
Human Development

Human Development Index Score: 0.528 (2018)

Mean School Years: 6.1 years (2018)

 

Labour Indicators

Vulnerable Employment: 75.2% (2018)

Working Poverty Rate: 35.4% (2020)

Government Efforts
Key Ratifications
  • ILO Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029: Not Ratified
  • ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182: Ratified 2001
  • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol): Signed 2000
Social Protection Coverage

General (at least one): 2.9% (2016)

Unemployed: 0.0% (2016)

Pension: 7.8% (2017)

Vulnerable: 0.6% (2016)

Children: No data

Disabled: No data

Poor: No data

Measurement of child labour prevalence has evolved considerably over the past two decades. Estimates of child labour incidence are more robust and exist for more countries than any other form of exploitation falling under SDG Target 8.7.

Child Labour Rate, Aged 5-17 (Source: ILO)

Based on the international conventions and the International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ICLS)  resolution, and consistent with the approach utilized in the ILO global child labour estimates exercise, the statistical definition of child labour used includes:

a) children aged 5-11 years in all forms of economic activity;
b) children aged 12-14 years in all forms of economic activity except permissible “light” work;
c) children and adolescents aged 15-17 years in hazardous work; and
d) children aged 5-14 years performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week.

In Uganda, the percentage of child labourers has increased overall from 2002 to 2012. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years.

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-17 in child labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2012. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Hazardous child labour is the largest category of the worst forms of child labour with an estimated 73 million children aged 5-17 working in dangerous conditions in a wide range of sectors. Worldwide, the ILO estimates that some 22,000 children are killed at work every year.

In Uganda, the latest estimates show that 1.8 percent of children aged 5-14 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012 The number is higher than in 2005, and has increased from 1.5 percent in 2002. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 5-14 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2012. 

 

Children in Hazardous Work, Aged 15-17 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 15-17 are permitted to engage in economic activities by international conventions in most cases, except when the work is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children (Article 3 (d) of ILO Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour, 1999 (No. 182)).

In Uganda, the latest estimates show that 9.6 percent of children aged 15-17 were engaged in hazardous work in 2012. The percentage is higher than in 2005, and has increased from 7.7 percent in 2002. The measure provided for 2001 does not cover the full definition of hazardous work and cannot be compared directly with data from other sample years. 

The chart displays differences in the percentage of children aged 15-17 in hazardous labour by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2012. 

Weekly Work Hours, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children aged 5-11 are considered to be subjected to child labour when engaging in any form of economic activity. Children aged 12-14 are permitted to engage in “light” work that is not considered hazardous and falls below 14 hours per week.

According to the latest 2012 estimates, the average number of hours worked per week by children aged 5-14 in Uganda was 12.4 hours. The average number of hours worked has increased from 11.2 hours in 2005.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours that children aged 5-14 work in economic activities by sex and region. The sample includes all children of this age group. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2012. 

Weekly Work Hours Children Only in Economic Activity, Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Children not attending school who are engaged in economic activity can be subjected to longer working hours. 

In 2012, the latest year with available data, children in economic activity only, meaning they are not in school, worked an average of 31.6 hours per week. This number has increased since 2005, when the average number of hours worked by this age group was 23.5. 

The chart displays differences in the number of hours worked by children aged 5-14 who are not in school, by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2012. 

Weekly Hours Household Chores, Children Aged 5-14 (Source: ILO)

Researchers recognize that children involved in economic activities are not the only children working. The ICLS recommended definition of child labour includes children aged 5-14 performing household chores for at least 21 hours per week. 

Children aged 5-14, on average, are found to work on household chores 12.2 hours per week according to the 2012 estimate. This estimate represents a increase in hours worked across all age groups since the last estimate in 2005, which found that children aged 5-14 in Uganda worked an average of 9.5 hours per week.

The chart displays differences in the number of hours children aged 5-14 work on household chores by sex and region. Complete disaggregated data to compare groups is provided for 2001, 2005 and 2012. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: total (Source: ILO)

Identifying the sectors in which the most child labour exists can help policy actors and practitioners target efforts toward those industries. 

The latest data available on child labour by sector for Uganda is from 2012. By the 2012 estimate, the Agriculture sector had the most child labourers, followed by the Commerce, Hotels and Restaurants sector, the Other Services sector, the Manufacturing sector and the Construction, Mining and Other Industrial Sectors.

The chart to the right displays child labour prevalence in each sector for all children. The charts below show the differences in child labour by sector with comparisons between groups by sex and region. 

 

Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: sex (Source: ILO)
Children in Economic Activity by Sector, Aged 5-14: area (Source: ILO)

Measuring the incidence of forced labour is a much more recent endeavour and presents unique methodological challenges compared to the measurement of child labour.

No nationally representative data is available on forced labour prevalence in Uganda.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page for information on new guidelines presented by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the International Conference of Labour Statisticians.

The challenges in estimating human trafficking are similar to those of estimating forced labour, though recent innovations in estimation have begun to produce prevalence estimates in developed countries.

No nationally representative data is available on human trafficking prevalence in Uganda.

Visit the How to Measure the Change page to learn about measuring human trafficking prevalence, including information on collecting data through national referral mechanisms and producing prevalence statistics using Multiple Systems Estimation (MSE).

Case Data: International and Non-Governmental Organizations

Civil society organizations (CSOs) focused on human trafficking victim assistance can serve as crucial sources of data given their ability to reach a population that is notoriously difficult to sample.

Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC): The International Organization for Migration (IOM), Polaris and Liberty Asia have launched a global data repository on human trafficking, with data contributed by counter-trafficking partner organizations around the world. Not only does the CTDC serve as a central repository for this critical information, it also publishes normed and harmonized data from various organizations using a unified schema. This global dataset facilitates an unparalleled level of cross-border, trans-agency analysis and provides the counter-trafficking movement with a deeper understanding of this complex issue. Equipped with this information, decision makers will be empowered to create more targeted and effective intervention strategies.

Prosecution Data

UNODC compiles a global dataset on detected and prosecuted traffickers, which serves as the basis in their Global Report for country profiles. This information is beginning to paint a picture of trends over time, and case-specific information can assist investigators and prosecutors.

Key aspects of human development, such as poverty and lack of education, are found to be associated with risk of exploitation. Policies that address these issues may indirectly contribute to getting us closer to achieving Target 8.7.

Human Development Index (Source: UNDP)

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: (1) a long and healthy life; (2) access to knowledge; and (3) a decent standard of living. Human development can factor into issues of severe labour exploitation in multiple ways.

The chart displays information on human development in Uganda between 1990 and 2018. Only certain sample years have data disaggregated by sex. 

The most recent year of the HDI, 2018, shows that the average human development score in Uganda is 0.528. This score indicates that human development is low. 

 

HDI Education Index (Source: UNDP)

Lack of education and illiteracy are key factors that make both children and adults more vulnerable to exploitive labour conditions.

As the seminal ILO report Profits and Poverty explains:

“Adults with low education levels and children whose parents are not educated are at higher risk of forced labour. Low education levels and illiteracy reduce employment options for workers and often force them to accept work under poor conditions. Furthermore, individuals who can read contracts may be in a better position to recognize situations that could lead to exploitation and coercion.”

The bars on the chart represent the Education Index score and the line traces the mean years of education in Uganda over time.

 

Decent work, a major component of SDG 8 overall, has clear implications on the forms of exploitation within Target 8.7. Identifying shortcomings in the availability of equitable, safe and stable employment can be a step in the right direction towards achieving Target 8.7.

HDI Vulnerable Employment (Source: UNDP)

There are reasons to believe that certain types of labour and labour arrangements are more likely to lead to labour exploitation. According to the ILO:

“Own-account workers and contributing family workers have a lower likelihood of having formal work arrangements, and are therefore more likely to lack elements associated with decent employment, such as adequate social security and a voice at work. The two statuses are summed to create a classification of ‘vulnerable employment’, while wage and salaried workers together with employers constitute ‘non-vulnerable employment’.”

Between 1991 and 2018, Uganda showed a decrease in the proportion of workers in vulnerable employment as compared to those in secure employment.

 

Working Poverty Rate (Source: ILO)

Labour income tells us about a household’s vulnerability. As the ILO explains in Profits and Poverty

“Poor households find it particularly difficult to deal with income shocks, especially when they push households below the food poverty line. In the presence of such shocks, men and women without social protection nets tend to borrow to smooth consumption, and to accept any job for themselves or their children, even under exploitative conditions.”

ILO indicators that measure poverty with respect to the labour force include working poverty rate, disaggregated by sex, with temporal coverage spanning from 2000 to 2020. The chart displays linear trends in working poverty rate over time for all individuals over 15 years of age.

Labour Productivity (Source: ILO)

Labour productivity is an important economic indicator that is closely linked to economic growth, competitiveness, and living standards within an economy.” However, when increased labour output does not produce rising wages, this can point to increasing inequality. As indicated by a recent ILO report (2015), there is a “growing disconnect between wages and productivity growth, in both developed and emerging economies”. The lack of decent work available increases vulnerability to situations of labour exploitation. 

Labour productivity represents the total volume of output (measured in terms of Gross Domestic Product, GDP) produced per unit of labour (measured in terms of the number of employed persons) during a given period.

 

Research to date suggests that a major factor in vulnerability to labour exploitation is broader social vulnerability, marginalization or exclusion.

Groups Highly Vulnerable to Exploitation (Source: UNHCR)

Creating effective policy to prevent and protect individuals from forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour means making sure that all parts of the population are covered, particularly the most vulnerable groups, including migrants.

According to the 2016 Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: “Almost one of every four victims of forced labour were exploited outside their country of residence, which points to the high degree of risk associated with migration in the modern world, particularly for migrant women and children. “

As IOM explains: “Although most migration is voluntary and has a largely positive impact on individuals and societies, migration, particularly irregular migration, can increase vulnerability to human trafficking and exploitation.” UNODC similarly notes that: “The vulnerability to being trafficked is greater among refugees and migrants in large movements, as recognized by Member States in the New York declaration for refugees and migrants of September 2016.”

The chart displays UNHCR’s estimates of persons of concern in Uganda.

Achieving SDG Target 8.7 will require national governments to take direct action against the forms of exploitation through policy implementation.

Official Definitions
Forced Labour

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. Interpretation.
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
e. “”forced labour”” means all work or service which is exacted from any person under the threat of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered him/herself voluntarily”

The Employment Act, 2006 (Act No. 6)

“2. Interpretation
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
“”forced and compulsory labour”” means all work or service which is extracted from any person under the threat of a penalty, including the threat of any loss of rights or privileges and for which that person has not offered himself or herself voluntarily;”

“3. Application of the Act
1. Except as otherwise provided in this Act, this Act applies to all employees employed by an employer under a contract of service.
2. This Act does not apply to—

a.employers and their dependent relatives when dependant relatives are the only employees in a family undertaking, as long as the total number of dependent relatives does not exceed five; and
b. the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces, other than their civilian employees.

3. The Minister may, after consultation with the Labour Advisory Board and after taking due account of all Conventions and other international instruments ratified by Uganda, by regulation exclude form the application of all or part of this Act, limited categories of employed persons in respect of whom special problems of a substantial nature arise.
4. The Minister may, after consultation with the Labour Advisory Board, by regulation exclude form the application of all or part of this Act, categories of employed persons whose terms and conditions of employment are governed by special arrangements afford protection that is equivalent to or better than the provisions of this Act from which those categories are being excluded.
5. Except where the contrary is proved, nothing in this Act applies to Employment outside Uganda”

“5. Forced Labour
1. No person shall use or assist any other person, in using forced or compulsory labour.
2. The term “”forced or compulsory labour”” does not include-

a. any work or service extracted by virtue of compulsory military service laws for work of a purely military character;
b. any work or service which forms part of the normal civic obligations of the citizens of uganda
c. any work or service extracted from any person as a consequence of a conviction by a court of law, provided that the work or service is carried out under the supervision and control of a public authority and that the person is not hired out to or placed at the disposal of a private individual. company or association
d. any work or service extracted in cases of an emergency, such as in the event of war or disaster or threat of calamity in any circumstance that would endanger the existence or the wellbeing of the whole or part of the population “

Constitution of Uganda, 1995

“Article 25 Protection from slavery, servitude and forced labour
(2) No person shall be required to perform forced labour.
(3) For the purposes of this article, “”forced labour”” does not include-

(a) any labour required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court;
(b) any labour required of any person while that person is lawfully detained which, though not required in consequence of the sentence or order of a court, is reasonably necessary in the interests of hygiene or for the maintenance of the place at which the person is detained;
(c) any labour required of a member of a disciplined force as part of that member’s duties as such or, in the case of a person who has conscientious objections to service as a member of a naval, military or air force. any labour which that person is required by law to perform in place of that service;
(d) any labour required during any period when Uganda is at war or in case of any emergency or calamity which threatens the life and well-being of the community, to the extent that the requiring of the labour is reasonably justifiable in the circumstances of any situation arising or existing during the period or as a result of the emergency or calamity, for the purpose of dealing with that situation; or
(e) any labour reasonably required as part of reasonable and normal communal or other civic obligations.”

Child Labour

The Employment Act, 2006 (Act No. 6)

“2. Interpretation
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
“”child”” means a person below the age of eighteen years;
“”light work”” means work that is not physically, mentally, and socially injurious to the child;”‘

“32. Employment of Children
1. A child under the age of twelve years shall not be employed in a business, undertaking or work place
2. A child under the age of fourteen years shall not be employed in any business, undertaking or workplace, except for light work carried out under supervision of an adult aged over eighteen years, and which does not affect the child’s education.
3. A person shall not continue to employ any child under the age of fourteen years after being notified in writing by a labour officer that the employment or work is not light work meeting the criteria in subsection 2
6. Any person, including a Labour Union or employers organisation may complain to a labour officer if he or she considers that a child is being employed in breach of this section
7. A person who is aggrieved by a decision of a labour officer under this section may appeal to the Industrial Court.”

Employment (Employment of Children) Regulations, 2012

“2. Interpretation.
In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—
“”child”” means a person below the age of eighteen years;
“”light work”” means work, which is—

a. not harmful to a child’s health;
b. not harmful to a child’s development;
c. not prejudicial to a child’s attendance at school;
d. not prejudicial to a child’s participation in vocational training; and
e. not in excess of fourteen hours per week.”

“3. Employment of child
A child under the age of fourteen years shall not be employed in any business undertaking or workplace, except—

a. for light work carried out under the supervision of an adult; and
b. where the work does not exceed fourteen hours per week”

“4. Activities that may be considered to be light.
10. Hours of Work
A child aged between fifteen and eighteen years who has completed his or her education or does not attend school, may work up to seven hours a day but shall not exceed thirty five hours per week”

Children’s (Amendment) Act, 2016

“2. Amendment of section 1 of the principal Act
The Children Act, in this Act referred to as the principal Act, is amended in section 1 by inserting in the appropriate alphabetical order the following definitions—
“”child labour”” means work that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to a child, and the circumstances under which it is performed jeopardizes the health, safety, morals and education of a child;”

Worst Forms of Child Labour

The Employment Act, 2006 (Act No. 6)

“32. Employment of Children
4. A child shall not be employed in an employment or work which is injurious to his or her health, dangerous or hazardous or otherwise unsuitable an an employer shall not continue to employ a child after being notified in writing by a labour officer that the employment or work is injurious to health dangers or otherwise unsuitable for the child.
5. A child shall not be employed between the hours of 7pm and 7am”

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. Interpretation.
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
a. “”child”” means a person below the age of 18 years”

Employment (Employment of Children) Regulations, 2012

“2. Interpretation.
In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—
“”hazardous work”” means work, which by its nature or circumstances in which it is performed, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of a child and includes circumstances where—

a. a child is exposed to dangerous machinery, equipment and tools;
b. a child carries heavy loads beyond their capacity;
c. a child works in unhealthy environments that expose them to hazardous substances, infectious diseases, excessive noise, temperature or vibrations;
d. a child is exposed to harassment or physical, psychological or sexual abuse;
e. a child works underground, in water, or at heights;
f. a child is unreasonably confined to the premises of the employers; or
g. a child works under strenuous conditions such as work for long hours;

“”the worst forms of child labour”” means—

a. all forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale and trafficking of a child, debt bondage, serfdom, forced or compulsory labour, including—

i. a child who works to pay off a loan or other obligation incurred by the family;
ii. a child trafficked by organised networks, bought and sold within and across national borders;
iii. a child trafficked for prostitution, beggin , soliciting and for work in places such as construction sites, shops, factories and domestic service; and
iv. a child being forced to participate in armed conflicts and hostilities;

b. the use, procurement or offering of a child for prostitution, production of pornography or pornographci performances and the use of the internet to spread child pornography;
c. the use, procurement or offering of a child for illicit activities, including the production and trafficking of drugs; and
d. work which by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of a child.”

“5. Unsuitable and hazardous work
A child shall not be employed to do work which is injurious, dangerous, hazardous or in the worst forms of child labour.
6. The national list of hazardous work
The list prescribed in the First Schedule shall be the designated list of hazardous work not permitted for employment of a child
12. A child shall not be employed at night between the hours of 7 pm and 7 am”

First Schedule—List of hazardous occupations and activities not permitted for employment of children

Children’s (Amendment) Act, 2016

“2. Amendment of section 1 of the principal Act
The Children Act, in this Act referred to as the principal Act, is amended in section 1 by inserting in the appropriate alphabetical order the following definitions—
“”child trafficking”” means recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child by means of threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, abduction or fraud, deception, abuse of power, or of a position of vulnerability, or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person for the purpose of exploitation;
“”child exploitation”” means the employment of a child in activities from which other people derive a benefit, whether financial, sexual or political and includes activities such as child trafficking , child prostitution, child pornography and involvement of children in armed conflict;”

“7. Replacement of Section 8 of the principal Act
For section 8 of the principal Act there is substituted the following—
“”8. Harmful Employment.
1. A person shall not employ or engage a child in any activity that may be harmful or hazardous to his or her health, or his or her physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development.
2. Subject to subsection 1, the minimum age of employment of a child shall be 16 years.
3. For the purpose of this section, “”harmful or hazardous employment”” includes work which exposes a child to physical or psychological torture, sexual abuse, work underground, work at dangerous heights or in confined spaces, work with dangerous machinery, equipment and tools, or manual handling or transportation of heavy loads, work with chemical sand dangerous substances, work under extreme temperatures, high level of noise, or working for longer hours or any other form of child labour which includes slavery, trafficking in persons, debt bondage and other forms of forced labour, forced recruitment for use in armed conflict, prostitution, pornography and illicit activities.”

“11. Insertion of new section 42A, 42 B and 42 C under Part V of the Principal Act
The Principal Act is amended by inserting immediately after section 42 the following new sections—
42A. Protection of children from all forms of violence
1. Every child has a right to be protected against all forms of violence including sexual abuse and exploitation, child sacrifice, child labour, child marriage, child trafficking, institutional abuse, female genital mutilation, and any other form of physical or emotional abuse.”

Human Trafficking

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. Interpretation.
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
r. “”trafficking in persons”” means the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion of, of abduction, fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation;”

Slavery

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. Interpretation.
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
p. “”slavery”” is the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised;
q. “”slave trade”” includes all acts involved in the capture, acquisition or disposal of a person with the view to selling or exchanging him or her and with the intention of reducing him or her to slavery;”

Constitution of Uganda, 1995

“Article 25 Protection from slavery, servitude and forced labour
(1) No person shall be held in slavery or servitude.”

International Commitments
International Ratifications

ILO Forced Labour Convention, C029, Ratified 1963

ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, C105, Ratified 1963

ILO Minimum Age Convention, C138, Ratified 2003 (minimum age specified 14 years)

ILO Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, C182, Ratified 2001

Slavery Convention 1926 and amended by the Protocol of 1953, Accession 1964

UN Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, Accession 1964

UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol), Signed 2000

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Ratified 1990

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Accession 2002

UN Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, Accession 2001

National Action Plans, National Strategies

National Action Plan for the Elimination of Child Labor 2017/2018–2021/2022

National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking (2013–2018)

Guides the government’s efforts to combat human trafficking.

National Social Protection Policy

Aims to reduce poverty and socioeconomic inequalities for inclusive development by targeting vulnerable people, including child laborers.

National Strategy for Girls’ Education in Uganda (2015–2019)

Promotes girls’ education and identifies child labor, particularly domestic work, as a key barrier to girls’ access to education.

United Nations Development Assistance Framework for Uganda, 2016-2020

Second National Development Plan (NDP II), 2016-2020

Governments can take action to assist victims and to prevent and end the perpetration of forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. These actions should be considered in wider societal efforts to reduce prevalence and move towards eradication of these forms of exploitation.

Programs and Agencies for Victim Support

Policies for Assistance
Policies for Assistance, Human Trafficking

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“2. Interpretation.
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—
s. “”victim of trafficking”” includes a person who is being or has been trafficked as per the definition of trafficking in Persons provided under this Act.”

11. Non Discrimination of Victims of trafficking in Persons
“12. Protection Assistance and Support for Victims of Trafficking
1. A victim of trafficking shall be legally recognized as such and shall not be penalized for any crime committed as a direct result of his or her trafficking”
13. Confidentiality
14. Repatriation of Victims of trafficking in Persons
15. Restitution
16. Compensation
17. Absence of Victims and Court Awards

Policies for Assistance, General

Employment Act, 2006

“39. Repatriation
1. An employee recruited for employment at a place which is more than one hundred kilometres from his or her home shall have the right to be repatriated at the expense of the employer to the place of engagement in the following cases—

a. on the expiry of the period of service stimulated in the contract;
b. on the termination of the contract by reason of the employee’s sickness or accident;
c. on the termination of the contract by agreement between the parties, unless the contract contains a written provision to the contrary; and
d. on the termination of the contract by order of the labour officer, the Industrial Court or any other court.”

“96. Penalties
4. Where a court imposes a fine it may under this Act, it may direct that the fine, when recovered, or such part of it as the court thinks fit, shall be applied to compensate any employer, employee or other person for any wrong done. ”

Children Act, 1997

102. Protection of privacy and restriction on publication. (1) The child’s right to privacy shall be respected throughout the court proceedings in order to avoid harm being caused to him or her by undue publicity; and no person shall, in respect of a child charged before a family and children court, publish any information that may lead to the identification of the child except with the permission of court. (2) Any person who contrary to subsection (1) publishes— (a) the name or address of the child; (b) the name or address of any school which the child has been attending; or (c) any photograph or other matter likely to lead to the identification of the child, commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding five hundred thousand shillings or to imprisonment not exceeding six months or to both.

Children’s (Amendment) Act, 2016

“11. Insertion of new section 42A, 42 B and 42 C under PArt V of the principal Act
the PRincipal Act is amended by inserting immediately after section 42 the following new sections—
42C. Rights to protective services”

Penalties
Penalties, Human Trafficking

Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, 2009

“3. Offence of trafficking in persons
4. Aggravated trafficking in persons
5. Trafficking in children
6. Engaging the Labour or Services of a Victim of Trafficking in Persons
7. Promoting Trafficking in Persons
8. Offences Related to Trafficking in Persons”

Penalties, Forced Labour

Employment Act, 2006

5.3. A person who contravenes this section commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding forty eight currency points or to two years imprisonment, or both and to a fine of four currency points for each day or part of the day on which the breach continues

Penal Code, 1950

“252. Unlawful compulsory labour.
Any person who unlawfully compels any person to labour against the will of that person commits a misdemeanour.”

Penalties, General

Employment Act, 2006

“37. Migrant Workers
1. No person shall organise the illicit or clandestine movement of migrant for Employment for purposes of departing from, passing through or arriving in Uganda, or give assistance to any organisation for that purpose.
2. A person shall not employ a person whom he or she knows to be unlawfully present in Uganda
3. A person who contravenes this section commits an offence”

Penal Code, 1950

“245. Kidnapping or abducting in order to subject person to grievous harm, slavery, etc.
Any person who kidnaps or abducts any person in order that such person may be subjected or may be so disposed of as to be put in danger of being subjected to grievous harm, or slavery, or to the unnatural lust of any person, or knowing it to be likely that such person will be so subjected or disposed of, commits a felony and is liable to imprisonment for fifteen years.”

“249. Buying, etc. of any person as a slave.
Any person who imports, exports, removes, buys, sells or disposes of any person as a slave, or accepts, receives or detains against his will any person
as a slave, commits a felony and is liable to imprisonment for ten years.”

“250. Habitual dealing in slaves.
Any person who habitually imports, exports, removes, buys, sells, traffics or deals in slaves commits a felony and is liable to imprisonment for fifteen years.
251. Inducing a person to give up himself or herself as a slave.

(1) Any person who induces another person to give up himself or herself as a slave commits a felony and is liable on conviction to imprisonment for ten years.
(2) Any person who attempts or conspires with another person to induce a person to give up himself or herself as a slave or is an accessory thereto commits a felony and is liable on conviction to imprisonment for five years.”

“158. Master not providing for servants or apprentices.
Any person who, being legally liable either as master or mistress to provide for any apprentice or servant necessary food, clothing or lodging, wilfully and without lawful excuse refuses or neglects to provide the same, or unlawfully and maliciously does or causes to be done any bodily harm to such apprentice or servant so that the life of such apprentice or servant is endangered or that his or her health has been or is likely to be permanently injured, commits a misdemeanour.”

Penalties, Child Labour

Employment Act, 2006

“96. Penalties
1. A person who contravenes a provision of this Act, for which no penalty is expressly provided is liable, on conviction to a fine not exceeding twenty four currency points and on a second or subsequent conviction for the same offence, is liable to fine not exceeding forty eight currency points or to imprisonment for term not exceeding two years, or to both
2. Where an employer acts in contravention of any provision of this Act not specifically designated as an offence, a labour officer may caution him or her in writing against repeating or continuing such behavior and if, having received a written caution, the employer repeats the infringement in respect of which a caution, has been given, he or she commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding twenty four currency points or to imprisonment not exceeding one year or to both
3. Where an employer already convicted under subsection 2 commits a subsequent offence against the same provision of the Act, the employer is liable to fine not exceeding forty eight currency points or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or to both.”

Employment (Employment of Children) Regulations, 2012

“16. Duties of a labour officer
1. A labour officer in exercising the powers prescribed for in sections 10 and 11 of the Act shall notify an employer who is found employing child in dangerous and unstable work to discontinue that employment.
2. A labour officer shall ensure that the list of hazardous work not permitted for Employment of child is displayed by all employers at their premises.
3. A labour officer shall prepare a quarterly report on Employment of children and young persons and submit it to the Commissioner for labour and shall give a copy to the Chief Administrative Officer of the district

19. Offence and Penalty
A person who obstructs a labour officer in the exercise of the power conferred by these REgulations commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding six currency points or imprisonment not exceeding three months or both”

Children Act, 1997

109. General penal provision for offences under the Act. A person who contravenes any of the provisions of this Act commits an offence and, with the exception of a person convicted under section 98, is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding one hundred thousand shillings or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both.

Children’s (Amendment) Act, 2016

“8. Insertion of Section 8A in the Principal Act
The Principal Act is amended by inserting a new section 8A immediately after section 8 to read as follows—
“”8A. Prohibition of sexual exploitation
1. A person shall not engage a child in any work or trade that exposes the child to activities of sexual nature whether paid for or not
2. For avoidance of doubt, it shall be unlawful for any person to use—

a. inducement or coercion in the encouragement of a child to engage in any sexual activity;
b. children in prostitution or other unlawful sexual practices; and
c. children in pornographic performances or materials.
A person who contravenes this section commits an offence and is liable, on conviction, to a fine not exceeding one hundred currency points or to a term of imprisonment not exceeding five years.”

Data Commitments

A Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking, Not signed

1.ii. Take steps to measure, monitor and share data on prevalence and response to all such forms of exploitation, as appropriate to national circumstances;

Programs and Agencies for Enforcement

Measures to address the drivers of vulnerability to exploitation can be key to effective prevention. A broad range of social protections are thought to reduce the likelihood that an individual will be at risk of exploitation, especially when coverage of those protections extends to the most vulnerable groups.

Social Protection Coverage: General (at Least One)
Social Protection (Source: ILO)

The seminal ILO paper on the economics of forced labour, Profits and Poverty, explains the hypothesis that social protection can mitigate the risks that arise when a household is vulnerable to sudden income shocks, helping to prevent labour exploitation. It also suggests that access to education and skills training can enhance the bargaining power of workers and prevent children in particular from becoming victims of forced labour. Measures to promote social inclusion and address discrimination against women and girls may also go a long way towards preventing forced labour.

If a country does not appear on a chart, this indicates that there is no recent data available for the particular social protection visualized.

Social Protection Coverage: Pension
Social Protection Coverage: Vulnerable Groups
Social Protection Coverage: Children
Social Protection Coverage: Disabled

Delta 8.7 has received no Official Response to this dashboard from Uganda. If you are a representative of Uganda and wish to submit an Official Response, please contact us here.