Global Dashboard

On any given day in 2016, an estimated 40.3 million people were in situations of modern slavery and 152 million children were in situations of child labour. Modern slavery is a term that refers to a range of situations of exploitation in which a person cannot leave because of threats, violence, coercion, deception and/or abuse of power. Presented in this tab are data visualizations that feature collected data on the prevalence of these modern-day human rights abuses from the International Labour Organization (ILO), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and Minderoo Foundation’s Walk Free Initiative.

Click here to interact with these visualizations.

Prevalence of modern slavery

According to the ILO, Walk Free and IOM, modern slavery is most prevalent in Africa, with 7.6 victims per 1,000 people, as depicted in blue. The Arab States and Europe and Central Asia are the same colour as they fall within the same modern slavery prevalence range.

Prevalence of forced labour

This visualization shows the prevalence of forced labour. The larger the bubble, the higher the prevalence. Forced labour was most prevalent in Asia and the Pacific, where 4 out of every 1,000 people were victims, and least prevalent in the Americas where 1.3 out of every 1,000 people were victims.

Prevalence of child labour

In 2016, the ILO estimated that there were 152 million child labourers around the world. Africa had the highest prevalence, with more than 19 per cent of African children in situations of child labour, and the Arab States had the lowest with 2.9 per cent.

Prevalence of children in hazardous work

Of the 152 million child labourers in 2016, 73 million were engaged in hazardous work — meaning their health, safety or moral development were endangered. The larger the bubble, the higher the prevalence. The highest prevalence was in Africa with 8.6 per cent of African child labourers in hazardous work.

Governments play a critical role in developing policies and programmes that are needed to address modern slavery. One important global initiative is the UK’s 2017 “Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking”, which has been endorsed by the countries highlighted below.

Learn more information about the UK Government’s efforts to end forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking here.

The Call to Action was launched by World Leaders on 19 September 2017 during the 72nd Meeting of the UN General Assembly. You can read the full Call to Action here.

It is also available in ArabicChineseFrenchRussian and Spanish.

The Call to Action outlines practical actions that countries can take to achieve Target 8.7 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, including to:

  • Ratify and ensure the effective implementation of relevant international conventions, protocols, and frameworks.
  • Strengthen law enforcement and criminal justice responses in order to rapidly enhance capacity to identify, investigate, and disrupt criminal activity.
  • Put victims first.
  • Eradicate forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking, and the worst forms of child labour from [their] economies […] by developing regulatory or policy frameworks, as appropriate, and working with business to eliminate such practices from global supply chains.

Learn more about what action has been taken since the launch of the Call to Action here.

Endorse the Call to Action

If you would like to know more about how to endorse the Call to Action, please contact us.

What is a pathfinder country?

Pathfinder countries go further and faster to achieve Target 8.7. They accelerate efforts, try new approaches and collaborate with others. All UN member states have committed to do more, so pathfinder status is open to any country, regardless of development level. Pathfinder countries commit to:

  • Develop, adopt and put into practice improved legislation, national action plans or policies on child labour, forced labour, modern slavery and/or human trafficking
  • Translate public commitments into concrete actions after having signed the Call to Action to End Forced Labour, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking and/or made a pledge to implement the Buenos Aires Declaration of the IV Global Conference on the Sustained Eradication of Child Labour (Buenos Aires, 14-16 November 2017) or similar initiatives
  • Ratify, or actively work towards the ratification or implementation of, applicable international human rights standards, including international labour standards.

The Alliance 8.7 Global Coordinating Group, which acts at the Alliance’s steering committee, reviews and decides on pathfinder countries’ requests on a periodical basis.

What are pathfinder countries expected to do?

Pathfinder countries turn their commitments into action. They can pick up the pace in their own country and/or support other countries to accelerate action. At a national level, they convene strategic planning workshops on Target 8.7 to explore opportunities for collaboration and define national priorities. The expected output of these workshops is a workplan that sets out priorities, key actions, responsibilities, timelines and budgets. The workshops should identify what a country needs to do to meet Target 8.7, which can include complying with international human rights and labour standards, legislative action, new and different policies, new partnerships, additional data and research, and identifying indicators to measure progress.

Why become a pathfinder country?

Alliance 8.7 pathfinder countries: Will, through ending child labour, forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking, bring about more inclusive and sustainable development Showcase progress and successful interventions in regional and international events, using the Alliance as a platform Gain access to good practice, knowledge and expertise Can themselves serve as an example to drive change by showing progress and successful interventions Receive technical support for the preparation of strategic planning workshops Receive guidance on the preparation of progress reports, e.g. under the Voluntary National Review Mechanism (VNR) of the Agenda 2030.

How to become a pathfinder country?

Countries need to submit a formal expression of interest to the Alliance 8.7 Secretariat. The letter should be signed by a government minister and set out: The country’s interest in participating as a pathfinder country Its commitment to significantly accelerate efforts towards achieving Target 8.7 Recent achievements and previous national initiatives to build upon The appointment of a senior government official as a focal point to lead and coordinate Alliance 8.7 efforts in the country. Organizing a strategic planning workshop is a first important step to bring partners together, establish a common agenda and prioritize country-level action. For further information on dates and locations of strategic workshops please visit the Alliance 8.7 calendar.

For further information on becoming a pathfinder country or upcoming workshops, please contact info@alliance87.org

Official Development Assistance (ODA) is government aid that promotes and specifically targets the economic development and welfare of developing countries. Presented below are data visualizations depicting ODA funding flows from 2000-2013 that addressed forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour.

Click here to interact with these dynamic visualizations.

 

How much and who committed?

Between 2000-2013 more than USD 4 billion in ODA was spent by 30 OECD countries to address modern slavery, forced labour, human trafficking and child labour. The bubble grows and the colour changes depending on the cumulative commitment over time. In terms of these ODA commitments, the United States is the top donor country, spending almost 10 times as much as the next donor, Canada, followed by Norway, Australia, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Who received ODA?

Over 100 countries received this ODA from 30 OECD countries. Notice how the bubble grows and colour changes depending on the cumulative amount received over time, ranging from under USD 1 million to more than USD 275 million.

OECD-country ODA funding flows

This data visualization shows the total ODA flows from OECD countries. The US committed more than USD 2 billion on ODA between 2000-2013. A handful of countries received the bulk of these commitments, receiving an average of at least USD 10 million per year. The remaining countries received less than USD 1 million per year on average. One dot in the flow is equivalent to USD 1,000.

Targeted spending by exploitation type

In 2000, ODA commitments aimed at eradicating child labour vastly outpaced commitments dealing with other forms of exploitation. Starting around 2008, funds committed to address child labour (purple bubble) decrease, and funds to address human trafficking (blue bubble) increase, outpacing the other forms of exploitation.

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of persons effectively covered by a social protection system, including social protection floors. It also reflects the main components of social protection: child and maternity benefits, support for persons without a job, persons with disabilities, victims of work injuries and older persons. Effective coverage of social protection is measured by the number of people who are either actively contributing to a social insurance scheme or receiving benefits (contributory or non-contributory). This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

General social protections by region

Africa
Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of children covered by social protection benefits measured as a ratio of households receiving benefits for children to the total number of households with children. This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of children covered by social protection benefits by region

Africa
Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of persons with disabilities receiving benefits. Disability Status as explained by the ILO:

“For measurement purposes, a person with a disability is defined as a person who is limited in the kind or amount of activities that he or she can do because of ongoing difficulties due to a long-term physical condition, mental condition or health problem.”

This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of persons with disabilities receiving benefits by region

Africa
Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of older persons receiving a pension measured as a ratio of persons above statutory retirement age receiving an old-age pension to the persons above statutory retirement age. This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of older persons receiving a pension by region

Africa
Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of poor persons covered by social protection systems. This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of poor persons covered by social protection systems by region

Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of unemployed receiving benefits measured as a ratio of recipients of unemployment benefits to the number of unemployed persons. This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of unemployed receiving benefits by region

Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

The following data visualizations reflect the proportion of vulnerable persons receiving benefits measured as a ratio of social assistance recipients to the total number of vulnerable persons. The latter are calculated by subtracting from the total population all people of working age contributing to a social insurance scheme or receiving contributory benefits and all persons above retirement age receiving contributory benefits. This data is publicly available published on behalf of the International Labour Organization. All countries and regions presented are the ones for which there is publicly available data.

The ILO Social Security Inquiry (SSI) is the main source of global data on social protection, used daily by policymakers, officials of international organizations and researchers. Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaire has become the main comprehensive tool used to compile data on social protection coverage for children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims, and the poor and the vulnerable.

The Social Security Inquiry (SSI) questionnaires can be completed independently of each other. However, the questionnaire for the Ministry of Labour should be filled first as it includes an inventory of existing social security schemes. This list is important to ensure that all schemes are accounted for in SSI.

The institutional unit responsible for a scheme (administering a scheme) is the main source of information and statistics necessary to complete the Questionnaire for Social Security Schemes. In cases where the scheme is supported by more than one institutional unit (for example, where different units are responsible for specific regions, groups of enterprises or category of workers), the requested information should be provided for the entire scheme, not broken down by institutional unit. If possible, the main institutional unit responsible for the scheme should provide the information. Learn more about the ILO Social Security Inquiry Questionnaire.

Proportion of vulnerable persons receiving benefits by region

Africa
Americas
Asia and the Pacific
Europe and Central Asia

In addition to bridging the knowledge gap between research and policy, one of Delta 8.7’s key mandates is expanding the evidence base on “what works” to achieve Target 8.7 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. For this reason, the interactive global dashboard, much like all 193 Member State country data dashboards, serves to highlight the multi-dimensional global measures, efforts and policies as well as publicly available data on forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour. In an effort to fulfil this mandate, presented below are inclusive resources that can be used as reference for the publicly available data showcased on all Delta 8.7 data dashboards.

The dashboards contain a mix of the below resources featuring publicly available data and information. All of these resources are cited in Delta 8.7’s respective “Measuring the change” pages, grouped by SDG Target 8.7 form of exploitation:

Using the above forms of exploitation, below are listed the sources from which all dashboards were created:

Links to relevant conventions: